Rheumatology International (RHEUMATOL INT )

Publisher: Springer Verlag

Description

Rheumatology International is an independent journal reflecting world-wide progress in the research diagnosis and treatment of the various rheumatic diseases. It is designed to serve the international and interdisciplinary group of workers involved in problems of rheumatic diseases. Rheumatology International will cover all modern trends in clinical and experimental research as well as in the management of rheumatic diseases. Special emphasis will be given to immuno-pathogenetic mechanisms inflammatory reactions collagen metabolism genetics epidemiology therapeutic modulation of immunological and inflammatory mechanisms and development and evaluation of diagnostic procedures connected with rheumatic diseases. Contributions to these topics will appear in the form of original publications informative case reports short communications editorials and reviews. "Letters to the editor" will be welcome as an enhancement to discussion. Every effort will be made to ensure speed of publication while maintaining a high standard of contents and production.

  • Impact factor
    2.21
    Show impact factor history
     
    Impact factor
  • 5-year impact
    1.87
  • Cited half-life
    4.30
  • Immediacy index
    0.32
  • Eigenfactor
    0.01
  • Article influence
    0.48
  • Website
    Rheumatology International website
  • Other titles
    Rheumatology international (Online)
  • ISSN
    0172-8172
  • OCLC
    60637814
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Springer Verlag

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Author's pre-print on pre-print servers such as arXiv.org
    • Author's post-print on author's personal website immediately
    • Author's post-print on any open access repository after 12 months after publication
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set phrase to accompany link to published version (see policy)
    • Articles in some journals can be made Open Access on payment of additional charge
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • M. G. Rabbani, S. A. Haq, N. Bellamy, M. N. Islam, M. R. Choudhury, A. Naheed, S. Ahmed, A. Shahin
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to develop and to validate a Bengali version of the Western Ontario and McMaster Osteoarthritis (WOMAC®) index in Bangladesh. The WOMAC® was translated into the local language of Bangladesh (Bengali) and adapted in the local sociocultural context, following the standard guidelines by Beaton et al. Content validity of the preliminary Bengali version was assessed by using the index of content validity (ICV) and floor and ceiling effects. Patients were assessed at the Department of Rheumatology of Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University and were diagnosed to have knee OA by American College of Rheumatology criteria and recruited according to the requirements of the validation study. Convergent and divergent validity were measured by comparing with Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) and the Short Form-36 (SF-36), and internal consistency was assessed using Cronbach’s alpha coefficient. The questionnaire was readministered to 40 patients within a week for assessing reliability by using intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) and Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient. In addition, factor analysis of Bengali WOMAC® questionnaire was performed to examine the number of factors influencing a common set of items. A Bengali version was developed with changes in three items to suit local practices. The ICV of the content validity was 1 for all items. The Bengali WOMAC® had similar construct validity when compared to the HAQ (ρ 0.74, n = 70) and SF-36 bodily pain and physical functioning. It had dissimilar construct validity to SF-36 mental health domain except WOMAC® pain. Factor analysis revealed five factors with eigenvalues of more than 1.0. Cronbach’s alpha and ICC exceeded 0.7 in all domains. In the test–retest reliability testing, Spearman’s ρ for all items exceeded 0.4 (n = 40). This study has demonstrated that the Bengali version of WOMAC® is a valid tool for assessing quality of life of patients with knee osteoarthritis in Bangladesh and is reliable.
    Rheumatology International 12/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to investigate musculoskeletal ultrasound (MSUS) as a diagnostic modality in DISH and to explore whether it might help in elucidating its pathogenesis and events that precede the calcification/ossification process. Fifty patients with DISH and 34 patients with osteoarthritis of the lower limbs without DISH were investigated. Data regarding demographics and traditional cardiovascular risk factors were collected from all patients. An ultrasonography was performed according to the Glasgow Ultrasound Enthesitis Scoring System (GUESS) by observers who were blinded to the diagnosis or the clinical findings in the patients. The total mean GUESS score for patients with DISH was 14.12 ± 5.2 and for patients without DISH 5.32 ± 4.99 (P DISH (P DISH was 88.53 % with sensitivity and specificity of 92 and 70.6 %, respectively, at a cutoff value of 6.36. A stepwise logistic regression analysis of the statistically significant items in the GUESS isolated four items, and the presence of either all of them or the first three items yielded the likelihood of having DISH to be 98.8 and 90.6 %, respectively. The GUESS and the stepwise logistic regression analysis of the GUESS items demonstrated a high likelihood of having DISH. MSUS might help to identify entheseal changes in DISH. Further studies are needed to confirm these results.
    Rheumatology International 12/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The Leeds Behçet's disease quality-of-life (BD-QoL) questionnaire is a specific and valid measure which is applied in English-speaking patients. We conducted Persian adaptation of BD-QoL questionnaire. Between June and December 2012, 220 Iranian patients fulfilling International Study Group criteria for the diagnosis of BD attending the rheumatology clinics at Tehran University of Medical Sciences were enrolled. Bilingual translators undertook the forward translation and cross-cultural adaptation of the BD-QoL questionnaire. Back-translation was conducted, and this version was sent to the designer of the questionnaire and revised accordingly. SF-36 health survey, Iranian Behçet's disease dynamic activity measure (IBDDAM), and Behçet's Disease Current Activity Form (BDCAF) were other administered measures. The Varimax rotation method with Kaiser normalization defined 5 factors with eigenvalues greater than 1.0. Studied cases were comprised of 118 males (53.6 %) and 102 females (46.4 %). Mean age of the patients was 38.3 ± 11.3 years (range 16-73). The mean BD-QoL score was 10.3 ± 8.8. Test-retest reliability was high, and two time points were significantly correlated (Spearman's correlation coefficient of 0.75-0.84). Cronbach's α coefficient of 0.949 demonstrated the excellent internal consistency. These factors cumulatively explained 58.74 % of total variance. The ratio of first to second eigenvalue was 7.08, which underlined the undimensionality. The results revealed adapted BD-QoL scores had significant correlation with IBDDAM (correlation coefficient = 0.19, P value = 0.005) and BDCAF (correlation coefficient = 0.21, P value = 0.002). Conversely, no significant correlation between BD-QoL and SF-36 results was detected (P value = 0.078). The Persian version of BD-QoL was shown to be unidimensional, highly reliable, and adequate construct validity.
    Rheumatology International 09/2014;
  • Rheumatology International 09/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Etanercept is approved for the treatment of patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) above the age of 2 years. Experience with younger children is limited. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of treatment with etanercept in children with JIA younger than 2 years. The prospective long-term observational BIKER registry documents baseline demographics, clinical characteristics, disease activity parameters and safety issues. Efficacy was determined using the PedACR response criteria, the JADAS-10 and the proposed criteria for inactive disease and remission after 3, 6, 12, 18 and 24 months. Safety assessments were based on adverse events (AE) and serious adverse events (SAEs) reports. Between January 2001 and June 2013, a total of 13 patients including four patients with systemic JIA (sJIA), four patients with extended oligoarthritis, one patient with persistent oligoarthritis and four patients with RF negative polyarthritis were treated with etanercept. Eleven patients with follow-up assessments were analysed in our study. Prior to etanercept, all patients have been exposed to methotrexate. At last observation, 6/11 patients reached a PedACR 70 response. Two patients with sJIA and 1 with nonsystemic JIA achieved inactive disease. Tolerability was good in most of the patients. Eight AE and one SAE occurred. One patient with sJIA was affected by Hodgkin's disease 18 months after discontinuation of etanercept. New onset uveitis occurred in two patients. Reasons for discontinuation were inefficacy in three (2 sJIA), intolerance in two, remission in three (2 sJIA) and the parents' request in one patient. Etanercept seems to improve JIA patients younger than 2 years including some of the patients with sJIA. Attention should be paid to the development of malignancies and autoimmune disorders.
    Rheumatology International 09/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to determine whether peptidyl arginine deiminase (PADI) genes could affect susceptibility to tuberculosis (TB), which can be a presumptive base to explain the increased incidence of TB in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in Korean. The study population consisted of 47 patients with active TB, 35 patients with nontuberculous mycobacterial disease, 50 RA patients, and 83 healthy controls who had received comprehensive medical testing. Genomic DNA was isolated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells using a standard protocol. All of the patients and healthy controls were genotyped for two nonsynonymous SNPs in PADI4, namely PADI4_89, PADI4_90, and one synonymous SNP in PADI4_104. There was the complete linkage between PADI4_89 and PADI4_90 SNPs. In the allele and haplotype analyses of PADI4_89 and PADI4_104, no significant associations are observed between disease groups and control groups. The frequencies of heterozygote (A/G) for PADI4_89 were significantly lower in patients with active TB than in controls [adjusted odd ratios (OR) = 0.35, p values = 0.020]. When the analysis was conducted by overdominant model, more significant associations are observed (adjusted OR = 0.34, p values = 0.005). We found that heterozygote genotypes for PADI4_89 were protectively associated with susceptibility to TB.
    Rheumatology International 09/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to validate a novel technique that predicts stopping of disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) and biologic agents (BA) from the Veterans Affairs (VA) database and compare infection risks of rheumatoid arthritis patients who stopped versus continued DMARDs/BA perioperatively. We identified 6,024 patients on 1 DMARD or BA in the perioperative period between 1999 and 2009. Time gap between medication stop date and the next start date predicted drug stoppage (X). Time gap between surgery date and stop date predicted whether stoppage was before surgery (Y). Chart review from Houston VA was used for validation. ROC analyses were performed on chart review data to obtain X and Y cutoffs. The primary endpoints were wound infections and other infections within 30 days. ROC analyses found X ≥ 33 (AUC = 0.954) and Y ≥ -11 (AUC = 0.846). Risk of postoperative infections was not different when stopping and continuing DMARDs/BA preoperatively. Stopping BA after surgery was associated with higher odds of postoperative wound (OR 14.15, 95 % CI 1.76-113.76) and general infection (OR 9.2, 95 % CI 1.99-42.60) compared to not stopping. Stopping DMARDs after surgery was associated with increased risk of postoperative general infection (OR 1.84, 95 % CI 1.07-3.16) compared with not stopping. There was positive association between stopping DMARDs after surgery and postoperative wound infection but failed to achieve statistical significance (OR 1.67, 95 % CI 0.96-2.91). There was no significant difference in postoperative infection risk when stopping or continuing DMARD/BA. Our new validated method can be utilized in the VA and other databases to predict drug stoppage.
    Rheumatology International 09/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to estimate the contributions of ethnic group and socioeconomic status as social determinants related to disability and disease activity in Chilean Mapuche and non-Mapuche patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Descriptive cross-sectional study with a stratified hospital-based sample of 189 patients in treatment with disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs. We assessed disability as categorical variable with the Health Assessment Questionnaire, disease activity with the Disease Activity Score instrument, and socioeconomic status with a standard questionnaire used by the Chilean government. Measures of association, stratified analyses and a multiple logistic regression model were used to analyze the data using the Stata 12.1 software package. Low socioeconomic status (annual income below US$ 7,200) is associated with disability (OR 3.87 CI 1.68-9.20) and Mapuche ethnic identity also contributes to disability (OR 2.48, CI 1.09-5.89). Relevant but not statistically significant in multivariable models were variables such as age, gender and place of residence. RA patients with a low socioeconomic status have almost three times the odds of having a moderate to high disability, independent of their ethnic group, gender or place of residence. Therefore, healthcare efforts should be aimed at promoting early diagnosis and prompt treatment among populations with high levels of poverty, which in the region of the Araucanía means primarily indigenous rural areas.
    Rheumatology International 09/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by joint swelling, joint tenderness, and destruction of synovial joints, leading to severe disability and premature mortality. RA is a multifactorial disease with genetic, environmental, and stochastic components related to its susceptibility. It has been demonstrated that the expression of osteopontin (OPN) is upregulated in the RA patients. Numerous studies have indicated that the full-length OPN or even OPN fragments, such as thrombin-cleaved OPN and its receptors, play the key roles in RA pathogenesis. Therapeutic application of siRNA to target OPN or neutralizing antibodies related to OPN epitopes in RA animal models are in progress, and some results are encouraging. However, there is a long way to go along with the clinical trials. This review focuses on the recent development in research associated with the OPN role in the pathogenesis of RA and provides insights concerning the OPN targeting as therapeutic approaches for patients with RA.
    Rheumatology International 08/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Spondyloarthritis (SpA) is a musculoskeletal inflammatory disease linked with immune responses to intestinal microbiota, and subclinical intestinal ulcerations that are closely related to inflammatory bowel diseases. Helicobacter pylori is a common cause of gastroduodenal ulceration, and anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae antibodies (ASCA) are associated with intestinal inflammation in both Crohn disease (CD) and SpA. We investigated the relationship between H. pylori and ASCA. Ninety-one patients with axial SpA and forty with CD were included. ASCA IgG/IgA and anti-H. pylori IgG titers were assessed by ELISA. The proportion of ASCA+ patients in the positive and negative anti-H. pylori IgG groups with SpA and CD were compared using Chi-square tests, and correlations were evaluated using the Spearman's coefficient. Anti-H. pylori IgG titers were significantly negatively correlated with the ASCA IgG (r = -0.563, p < 0.001) and IgA (r = -0.342, p = 0.019) titers in the axial SpA patients. The same pattern of negative correlation was also observed in the CD patients. Anti-H. pylori+ serology was significantly more frequent in axial SpA patients than in those with CD (52.4 vs. 18.4 %, p < 0.001), while ASCA+ serology was significantly more frequent in CD patients than in SpA patients. A negative correlation between the anti-H. pylori titers and ASCA was found for axial SpA and CD. Anti-H. pylori+ serology was more frequent in SpA than in CD, while ASCA positivity was more frequent in CD patients than in those with SpA. A possible influence of H. pylori on the development of ASCA needs further investigation.
    Rheumatology International 08/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Fibromyalgia syndrome is characterized by chronic generalized pain accompanied by a broad symptomatologic spectrum. Besides chronic fatigue, sleep disturbances, headaches and cognitive dysfunction that are extensively described in the literature, a considerable proportion of patients with fibromyalgia experience gastrointestinal symptoms that are commonly overlooked in the studies that are not specifically dedicated to evaluate these manifestations. Nevertheless, various attempts were undertaken to explore the gastrointestinal dimension of fibromyalgia. Several studies have demonstrated an elevated comorbidity of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) among patients with fibromyalgia. Other studies have investigated the frequency of presentation of gastrointestinal symptoms in fibromyalgia in a nonspecific approach describing several gastrointestinal complaints frequently reported by these patients such as abdominal pain, dyspepsia and bowel changes, among others. Several underlying mechanisms that require further investigation could serve as potential explanatory hypotheses for the appearance of such manifestations. These include sensitivity to dietary constituents such as gluten, lactose or FODMAPs or alterations in the brain-gut axis as a result of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth or subclinical enteric infections such as giardiasis. The gastrointestinal component of fibromyalgia constitutes a relevant element of the multidisciplinary pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying fibromyalgia that need to be unveiled, as this would contribute to the adequate designation of relevant treatment alternatives corresponding to these manifestations.
    Rheumatology International 08/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To assess the sequence and type of active joints in a cohort of newly diagnosed juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients with full access to current treatment at first visit and during a follow-up period of 5-years, in order to identify an index joint/group of joints for magnetic resonance imaging in JIA. Patient charts of all consecutive newly diagnosed JIA patients with a follow-up duration of at least 5 years were analyzed. Patients were derived from two tertiary pediatric rheumatology centers. Patient characteristics and data concerning the presence of joints with arthritis and the use of medication were recorded. Findings from 95 JIA patients [39 (41 %) oligoarticular and 56 (59 %) polyarticular] were analyzed. At first visit, distribution of active joints among patients was as follows: knee (n = 70, 74 %), ankle (n = 55, 58 %), elbow (n = 23, 24 %), wrist (n = 23, 24 %), metacarpophalangeal (MCP) (n = 20, 21 %), proximal interphalangeal (PIP) (n = 13, 14 %), hip (n = 6, 6 %), shoulder (n = 5, 5 %), and distal interphalangeal (DIP) (n = 4, 4 %) joints. After a follow-up period of 5 years, the cumulative percentage of patients with specific joint involvement changed into: knee (n = 88, 93 %), ankle (n = 79, 83 %), elbow (n = 43, 45 %), wrist (n = 38, 40 %), MCP (n = 36, 38 %), PIP (n = 29, 31 %), shoulder (n = 20, 21 %), hip (n = 17, 19 %), and DIP (n = 9, 10 %) joints. Despite changes in treatment strategies over the years, the knee remains the most commonly involved joint at onset and during follow-up in JIA, followed by the ankle, elbow, and wrist. For the evaluation of outcome with MRI, the knee appears the most appropriate joint in JIA.
    Rheumatology International 08/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of hypovitaminosis D on pain, quality of life (QoL) and nerve conduction studies (NCSs) in patients with chronic widespread pain (CWP). We randomly selected 83 female patients with CWP according to their vitamin D levels in this cross-sectional study. Patients were divided into two groups as sufficient vitamin D level (above 20 ng/ml) and deficient vitamin D level (below 20 ng/ml, hypovitaminosis D). Various pain scales and Nottingham Health Profile (NHP) were used. NCSs were also done. In patients with hypovitaminosis D, there were significantly higher pain scores for all scales (p value range 0.002-0.027). The subscale and total NHP scores were significantly higher in hypovitaminosis D group (p = 0.048-0.001) except social isolation subscale (p = 0.553). Vitamin D levels were in negative correlation with right and left median and/or ulnar motor nerve amplitudes, left tibial motor amplitude. This study confirm that hypovitaminosis D is related with higher pain intensity and lower QoL scores in patients with CWP when compared with control group. Additionally, we identified for the first time that there were negative correlations between vitamin D levels and some findings of NCSs.
    Rheumatology International 08/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Primary Sjögren syndrome (pSS) is a systemic autoimmune disease characterized by lymphocytic infiltration of the salivary and tear glands, and autoantibody secretion, in the absence of other systemic autoimmune disorder. Among autoimmune diseases, it is a relatively common disease, but the burden of central nervous system (CNS) involvement is controversial. This retrospective study evaluates the prevalence, clinical patterns and outcomes of CNS involvement in a cohort of patients with primary Sjögren syndrome. We evaluated 93 patients with pSS diagnosed according to American-European Consensus Group criteria. Fourteen patients (15.1 %) had CNS involvement. All were women with an average age of onset of the disease of 42.1 ± 14.7 years (average ± SD) and an average age of onset of neurological involvement of 47.29 ± 16 years. Three had parkinsonian syndrome, two epilepsy, two motor and sensory deficits, two headache with brain magnetic resonance abnormalities, two neuromyelitis optica, two chronic progressive myelitis and one aseptic meningitis. Neurological involvement preceded Sjögren syndrome diagnosis in nine of the patients (64 %), and neurological outcome was good in 11 patients (78.6 %). Central nervous involvement was not as rare as expected, and the frequency was similar to the frequency of peripheral nervous system involvement. In half of the patients, this was the first symptom of the disease, emphasizing the importance of considering this diagnosis, especially in young female with neurological symptoms without other evident cause.
    Rheumatology International 07/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Studies have found an increase in bone loss and fracture in individuals with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) compared with general population. The aim of this study was to describe the prevalence of osteopenia, osteoporosis, and fragility fractures and to find potential predictors of bone loss in our cohort of SLE patients. We performed a cross-sectional study and collected 67 bone density measurements (BMD) of our SLE patients. We also collected sociodemographic data, 25-OH-vitamin D levels, serological markers, activity index, SLE cumulative damage index, and pharmacologic treatment. Sixty-seven consecutive BMD from SLE patients were assessed. Osteopenia was found in 28-46 % of SLE patients. Osteoporosis ranged from 3 to 9 %. The only statistically significant correlation we found was between weight and height with total hip and femoral neck BMD (p < 0.05). The most frequent BMD-affected site was at the femoral neck, showing osteopenia in 46.2 % of SLE patients. Osteoporosis was found in up to 8.9 % of SLE patients. We found no predictors of bone loss in relation to the disease activity or its treatment. Fragility fractures were seen in 4.4 % of SLE patients. All patients with fragility fractures showed osteopenia at BMD. There is a high prevalence of bone loss in SLE patients, since up to 46 % of SLE patients showed low BMD. Total hip and femoral neck osteopenia were the most frequent findings correlated with low BMI. We found a lower prevalence of fragility fractures compared with other series.
    Rheumatology International 07/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: There is a paucity of published population-based estimates of the prevalence of chronic inflammatory arthritis in the pediatric population. We used administrative health data to estimate the prevalence of chronic inflammatory arthritis in individuals ≤18 years in three Canadian provinces: Quebec, Manitoba, and Saskatchewan. Cases aged ≤18 years were identified by meeting any one of the following criteria: (a) ≥1 hospital discharge abstract with an ICD-9 code of 714 or ICD-10-CA codes of M05, M06 or M08, or (b) ≥2 ICD-9 714 billing codes ≥8 weeks apart, but within 2 years, or (c) ≥1 ICD-9 714 billing code by a rheumatologist. Crude prevalence estimates per 10,000 population were estimated with 95 % confidence intervals (CIs). Prevalence estimates were 11.7 per 10,000 individuals ≤18 years of age in Manitoba, 9.8 per 10,000 in Saskatchewan, and 8.0 per 10,000 in Quebec. In pairwise comparisons of rate differences, Manitoba and Saskatchewan had higher estimates than Quebec. Prevalence estimates were higher for females than males, with a difference of 5.9 cases per 10,000 residents (95 % CI 5.1, 6.7). Saskatchewan was the only province with a higher estimate in urban compared to rural residents (5.2, 95 % CI 2.5, 8.0). Variations in provincial estimates may be due to differences in underlying population characteristics. Although these estimates have face validity and are in keeping with the range of previously published pediatric prevalence estimates, studies to establish the empiric validity of case-finding algorithms are needed to advance research in pediatric chronic disease epidemiology.
    Rheumatology International 07/2014;