International Journal for the Advancement of Counselling (Int J Adv Counsell )

Publisher: International Association for Counselling, Springer Verlag

Description

The International Journal for the Advancement of Counselling is published under the auspices of the International Round Table for the Advancement of Counselling and the International Association for Educational and Vocational guidance. The journal promotes the exchange of information about counselling activities throughout the world. Papers published in the journal are conceptual practical or research contributions providing an international perspective on the following areas: Theories and models of guidance and counselling Counsellor education and supervision State of the art reports on guidance and counselling in specific settings Special populations Special applications Counselling services in developing countries. The International Journal for the Advancement of Counselling publishes original articles major addresses and papers presented at the International Round Table for the Advancement of Counselling and other major international meetings and thematic reviews and discussions related to guidance and counselling.

  • Impact factor
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  • 5-year impact
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  • Cited half-life
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  • Immediacy index
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  • Eigenfactor
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  • Article influence
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  • Website
    International Journal for the Advancement of Counselling website
  • Other titles
    International journal for the advancement of counselling (Online)
  • ISSN
    0165-0653
  • OCLC
    41568899
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Springer Verlag

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Authors own final version only can be archived
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • On author's website or institutional repository
    • On funders designated website/repository after 12 months at the funders request or as a result of legal obligation
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set phrase to accompany link to published version (The original publication is available at www.springerlink.com)
    • Articles in some journals can be made Open Access on payment of additional charge
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This multiple qualitative case study with eight immigrant women examined women’s stories of migration and post-relocation adjustment to the U.S. The results showed that women described their lived experiences in distinctly gendered terms. The four superordinate themes that were present in their stories were Gendered Adaptation, Gendered Resilience, Gendered Violence, and Gendered Discrimination. Implications of these results for counseling practice, research, and advocacy are discussed.
    International Journal for the Advancement of Counselling 03/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: This synthesis of the literature on cross-cultural immersion experiences gives emphasis to the need for effective pedagogy for enhancing multicultural counseling competency, with cultural immersion being a potentially valuable training tool. The authors examine the empirical literature towards identifying both helpful and hindering structural and process factors in immersion experiences. Consideration is given to enhancing training experiences and suggestions for future research are provided.
    International Journal for the Advancement of Counselling 12/2013;
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    ABSTRACT: This study investigated Turkish college students’ subjective wellbeing in regard to psychological strength and demographic variables. A sample of Turkish college students (N = 1,052) aged 17–32 (mean age = 21, SD = 1.79) was administered various psychological strength instruments—the Gratitude Scale, the Rosenberg Self Esteem Inventory, the Generalized Self Efficacy Scale, the Life Orientation Test, the Positive/Negative Affect Scale and the Satisfaction with Life Scale. Participants also responded to a demographic data sheet. Non-parametric Kruskal-Wallis and Mann–Whitney U tests, Pearson correlation coefficients and Spearman row coefficients were used in data analysis. Results revealed that there was a strong association between psychological strengths and subjective wellbeing, with gratitude, satisfaction with life, self-esteem and positive affectivity having the most significant correlations, respectively. Demographic variables of gender, academic achievement, social involvement, type of residence, academic major, and financial and health status were also found to be associated with college students’ subjective wellbeing. Implications for college counseling are discussed.
    International Journal for the Advancement of Counselling 12/2013;
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    ABSTRACT: This qualitative study addressed how experienced Canadian masters-level counsellors perceived the collective identity of their profession in terms of roles, abilities, reputation, and sense of unity. The study employed a variation of grounded theory methodology guided by two research questions: (a) how do experienced counsellors view the professional identity of counselling?, and (b) how do counsellors describe their professional roles and practices? Nine categories of counsellor perceived identity and nine categories related to roles and practices emerged. Findings are discussed in light of the emerging trend toward the statutory regulation of counselling and psychotherapy in Canada.
    International Journal for the Advancement of Counselling 12/2013;
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    ABSTRACT: Career indecision particularly among college and undergraduate students is a concern of counselors and psychologists. This concern has led to numerous research studies related to career indecision and factors that influence it, such as family relationships. In this regard, several studies have reported a significant relationship between career indecision and parental attachment. However, little research has been undertaken on the influence of this factor in regard to career indecision for Iranian students. For this purpose, 158 Iranian freshmen and sophomores who had completed the ‘Career Decision Scale’ (Osipow et al., Journal of Vocational Behavior 9:233–243, 1976) and had been identified as career-undecided, completed the ‘Inventory of Parents and Peer Attachment-Revised’ (Armsden & Greenberg, Journal of Youth and Adolescence 16:427–453, 1987). The results revealed that a significant negative relationship was found between career indecision and attachment to mother, whilst the relationship between career indecision and attachment to father was not significant. However, regression analysis showed parental attachment did not significantly predict career indecision of students. Implications and recommendations for further research are discussed.
    International Journal for the Advancement of Counselling 12/2013;
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    ABSTRACT: Multiculturalism has been a topic of scholarly discourse and inquiry for the last three decades. As the philosophical commitment to multiculturalism continues to be endorsed by the counseling field, it is becoming increasingly imperative that we integrate theory, research, and practice in an applied and compelling manner. This article provides the results from a quantitative study exploring the dispositional and programmatic variables that influence the level of self-perceived multicultural competence among a sample of counselor trainees in the United States of America. The research contributes to a foundation for discussing the current status of multicultural counseling competence as well as generating creative strategies for enhancing future competence in counselors.
    International Journal for the Advancement of Counselling 12/2013;
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    ABSTRACT: Leuty and Hansen (Journal of Vocational Behavior 79:379-390, 2011) identified six domains of work values in undergraduate students in the West. The review undertaken in this paper suggests that the factor structure of work values of university students in Mainland China, Taiwan and Hong Kong essentially matches these six domains, except for the omission of 'Family Maintenance' and Wang's (Indigenous Psychological Research in Chinese Societies 2:206-250, 1993) 'Instrumental Values.' This suggests some commonality in the work values construct between the East and West, but there are a few subtle differences. It is argued that such differences heighten the need for measurement scales with context-specific and society-specific items when examining work values in different settings.
    International Journal for the Advancement of Counselling 12/2012; 34(4):269-285.
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    ABSTRACT: In recent years, various forms of career guidance and career counseling have become more prominent and better serviced in most universities throughout the world. Such services are obviously to the benefit of the students themselves and for society. After an initially slow start, researchers and practitioners in China have now begun to focus on the localization of guidance and counselling theory and strategies in order to match more exactly actual employment situations in different regions of the country. This should result in a service that meets students' needs more effectively. Using mainly core literature examining the context of career guidance and counseling in China from 2001 to the present, this paper elaborates on the current situation and summarizes the progress that has been made. The authors detail the content, implementation, problems that exist, and ways of improving projects of this kind in Chinese universities. Conclusions and suggestions for further research on career guidance and counseling are provided.
    International Journal for the Advancement of Counselling 09/2012; 34(3):202-210.
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    ABSTRACT: The overall goal of the paper is to illuminate some of the substantial challenges, joys, issues and lessons involved with international counseling and to lend impetus to advancing its progress by embracing globally-relevant cultural principles. Five U.S. counseling professionals with extensive international experience recount aspects of their scholarship, teaching, research and service in that domain. The meaning of such experiences was analyzed from an ecological perspective. The analysis was then critiqued for its primary assertions and implications for the internationalization of counseling by two independent professional counseling commentators, both of whom have logged considerable life and work experience around the world.
    International Journal for the Advancement of Counselling 02/2012; 34(3).
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    ABSTRACT: Acculturative stress is a common experience for international students and is associated with psychological and physical problems. In a previous study, the authors reported that two stress reduction interventions-expressive writing (EW) and assertiveness training (AT)-had limited overall benefits among international students at an American University. The current analyses of data from that study investigated whether individual differences moderated the effects of EW and AT. Results indicate that greater acculturative stress at baseline predicted greater improvement from both interventions, compared with control. Women benefited more from AT than EW, except that EW improved women's physical symptoms. Men benefited more from EW than AT. Students with limited emotional awareness and expression tended to benefit from both interventions, relative to control. Finally, nation of origin cultural differences generally did not predict outcomes. It is concluded that the benefits of EW and AT and can be enhanced by targeting these interventions to specific subgroups of international students.
    International Journal for the Advancement of Counselling 06/2011; 33(2):101-112.
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    ABSTRACT: The doctorate in Counselor Education and Supervision is the terminal degree in the field of counselor education within the U.S. The authors surveyed CACREP-accredited doctoral programs to assess department characteristics, clinical experience and credentials, research experience, and the admission, retention, and evaluation of students. Results indicated that the PhD was a preferable degree to other degree offerings. Programs were found to be diverse in their policies and procedures relating to admissions and retention, time to complete the program, and student expectations. International students and faculty representation was found to be sparse in CACREP-doctoral programs. Implications for future research and practice are offered. KeywordsCACREP–Counselor education–Doctoral education–Training–United States
    International Journal for the Advancement of Counselling 01/2011; 33(3):184-195.
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    ABSTRACT: Outpatient counseling is a relatively new concept and form of clinical practice in India. This article provides an overview of the need for and current status of counseling and family therapy in India. Examples of training programs are presented, and future prospects for the counseling and family therapy professions are highlighted. The authors discuss therapeutic issues that clinicians may need to consider when working with Indian clients, as well as some of the potential barriers to counseling individuals, couples, and families in or from the Indian subcontinent. The future of these professions looks bright and parallels India’s rapid development as a nation.
    International Journal for the Advancement of Counselling 02/2009; 31(1):45-56.
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    ABSTRACT: International counseling trainees (ICTs) can play a critical role in multicultural training and enrich the lives of domestic trainers and trainees. However, they face unique barriers. This inquiry examined 14 areas related to their training and stay in the US. Findings largely correspond with those already in the literature (e.g., Ng, International Journal for the Advancement of Counseling, 28:1–19 2006a). Results indicate significantly higher mean scores for ICTs (n = 56) in 10 areas (e.g., English proficiency problems, experiencing discrimination in their learning environment) compared to domestic trainees (DTs) (n = 82). ICTs further reported a high level of confidence in their contribution to their programs and a strong belief in their performance, although these levels did not differ significantly from DTs. Findings also revealed there were no program-level differences among the ICTs in all the study areas. Compared to the master’s trainees as a whole, however, the doctoral trainees combined reported higher degrees of experiencing cultural adjustment problems and conflicts with Western understanding and approaches to treating mental health. Implications and recommendations are outlined.
    International Journal for the Advancement of Counselling 02/2009; 31(1):57-70.
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    ABSTRACT: The author takes the position that the foundational value of the counseling profession is an ethic of appreciation for human differences. The professional tool that is used to actualize this value is language. In this regard, the philosophical distinction between copying and coping conceptualizations of language is overviewed. The author argues that the value of the counseling profession is optimally actualized when a coping conceptualization of language is adopted. Implications for current ideological movements and the future of the profession are discussed.
    International Journal for the Advancement of Counselling 11/2008; 30(4):249-261.
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    ABSTRACT: Ancient Chinese philosophers were interested in ways to promote psychological development and they made significant contributions, particularly in the area of mental testing. In the twentieth century the Chinese focused on behavioral psychology, and the field suffered a great setback during Mao’s Cultural Revolution. However, more recently, psychology has received governmental support, and psychologists in China today are rapidly developing the field of counseling psychology. This paper puts Chinese psychology in historical context and describes many current practices and needs regarding counseling psychology.
    International Journal for the Advancement of Counselling 11/2008; 30(4):213-219.
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    ABSTRACT: In the present study, the current status of international students and counselling services provided at Turkish universities is addressed. Firstly, a brief history of counselling and counselling services in Turkish universities is examined, leading to a consideration of the current status of international students and counselling services. Finally, key elements for working effectively with international students are presented and a long-term orientation model that might be applicable for Turkish university counselling centers is proposed.
    International Journal for the Advancement of Counselling 11/2008; 30(4):268-278.
  • [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This exploratory study addresses differences in self-image as a client characteristic in career counselling by using the Structural Analysis of Social Behaviour (Benjamin, L., Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 64(6), 1203–1212, 1996; Benjamin, L., Journal of Personality Assessment, 66(2), 248–266, 1996) and an adaptation (Andersson, W.P, and Niles, S.P., The Career Development Quarterly, 48(3), 251–263, 2000) of the Therapist Intention List (Hill C. E and O’Grady K. E., Journal of Counseling Psychology, 32(1), 3–22, 1985; Hill et al., Journal of Counseling Psychology, 35(3), 222–233, 1988). Expected and experienced behaviour of self and other, recalled helpful and non-helpful events during sessions, and evaluation of sessions were compared between two clients with identified positive self-image and two clients with identified negative self-image. The results indicated that the clients with a positive self-image compared to clients with a negative self-image expected more positive behaviours and experienced more positive in-session behaviours from both themselves and from the counsellor; they recalled more positive and fewer negative events in-session and they evaluated their session more positively. Implications for career counselling are discussed.
    International Journal for the Advancement of Counselling 08/2008; 30(3):189-201.

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