General Hospital Psychiatry (GEN HOSP PSYCHIAT )

Publisher: Elsevier

Description

General Hospital Psychiatry explores the linkages and interfaces among psychiatry, medicine and primary care. The Journal emphasizes a biopsychosocial approach to illness and health, and provides a forum for communication among professionals with clinical, academic, and research interests in psychiatry's essential function in "the mainstream of medicine." Building upon those liaison consultation and psychiatric services which have burgeoned in the general hospital setting, the Journal expands beyond this base to encourage new contributions to the understanding and treatment of illness - in inpatient, ambulatory, and community settings. Studies of multisystem relationships of life stresses, physical experience, psychosocial factors, interpersonal and intrapsychic reactions, family structure, ecological change, and institutional forces are especially relevant to the Journal's objectives. General Hospital Psychiatry publishes original articles on biopsychosocial approaches to medicine; liaison-consultation psychiatry; the relationship of psychiatric services to general medical systems; and new directions in medical education which stress psychiatry's role in primary care, family practice, and continuing education. It also features Brief Communications, News and Notes, Book Reviews, and Medical Psychiatric Rounds, of interest to physicians and other professionals and students in this field.

  • Impact factor
    2.98
    Show impact factor history
     
    Impact factor
  • 5-year impact
    3.31
  • Cited half-life
    6.60
  • Immediacy index
    0.42
  • Eigenfactor
    0.01
  • Article influence
    1.11
  • Website
    General Hospital Psychiatry website
  • Other titles
    General hospital psychiatry (Online)
  • ISSN
    0163-8343
  • OCLC
    38884908
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Elsevier

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Voluntary deposit by author of pre-print allowed on Institutions open scholarly website and pre-print servers
    • Voluntary deposit by author of authors post-print allowed on institutions open scholarly website including Institutional Repository
    • Deposit due to Funding Body, Institutional and Governmental mandate only allowed where separate agreement between repository and publisher exists
    • Set statement to accompany deposit
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to journal home page or articles' DOI
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Articles in some journals can be made Open Access on payment of additional charge
    • NIH Authors articles will be submitted to PMC after 12 months
    • Authors who are required to deposit in subject repositories may also use Sponsorship Option
    • Pre-print can not be deposited for The Lancet
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Objectives To examine characteristics of hospital admissions and risk-factors associated with re-hospitalization for self-poisoning with medications in adolescents aged 10–19 years. Method This study used data from the Norwegian Patient Register (NPR) from 2008 to 2011. The main outcome was hospital readmission within the observation period. A complementary log-log regression model was used to assess the effect of characteristics at index hospital admission on readmission. Results Of 1,497 patients, 76.4% were females and 89.8% were aged 15–19 years. At their first hospital admission, about one-third received a secondary psychiatric diagnosis. Females (47.5%) were registered with an E-code for intentional self-harm more often than males (33.7%) and females were more often than males discharged to further treatment (27.8% vs. 21.5%). As many as 18.4% was re-hospitalized for self-poisoning by medications. Significant predictors for hospital readmission were female sex (HR = 2.4, 95% CI 1.7, 3.6), discharge to further treatment (HR = 2.3, 95% CI 1.8, 2.9) and psychiatric secondary diagnoses (HR = 1.5, 95% CI 1.2, 1.9). Conclusion This national study demonstrated significant sex differences in adolescents treated in hospital for self-poisoning with medications. Psychiatric secondary diagnoses had a strong predictive effect on readmission, which indicates the importance of psychiatric/psychosocial assessment of adolescents who are admitted to hospital for self-poisoning with medications.
    General Hospital Psychiatry 09/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Objective This study examined sex differences and eating disorder risk among psychiatric conditions, compulsive behaviors (i.e., gambling, suicide thoughts and attempts) and substance use in a nationally representative sample. Method Data from participants of the Canadian Community Health Survey Cycle 1.2 who completed the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26; n=5,116) were analyzed. Sex differences were compared among psychiatric comorbidities according to eating disorder risk, binging, vomiting, and dieting behavior. Poisson regression analysis provided prevalence ratios (PRs) of disordered eating adjusting for age, marital status, income, BMI, and recent distress. Results Pronounced sex differences were associated with eating disorder risk (PRs 4.89 to 11.04; all p’s < 0.0001). Findings of particular interest included significantly higher PRs for eating disorder risk in males associated with gambling (PR 5.07, p < 0.0001) and for females associated with steroid and inhalant use as well as suicide thoughts and attempts (PRs 5.40 to 5.48, all p’s < 0.0001). . Discussion The findings from this detailed exploration of sex differences and eating disorder risk among psychiatric conditions, compulsive behaviors, and substance use suggest problem gambling, the use of inhalants and steroids, and suicidal ideation in relationship to eating disorder risk, warrant further investigation.
    General Hospital Psychiatry 04/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: This study examined sex differences and eating disorder risk among psychiatric conditions, compulsive behaviors (i.e., gambling, suicide thoughts and attempts) and substance use in a nationally representative sample. METHOD: Data from participants of the Canadian Community Health Survey Cycle 1.2 who completed the Eating Attitudes Test (n=5116) were analyzed. Sex differences were compared among psychiatric comorbidities according to eating disorder risk, binging, vomiting and dieting behavior. Poisson regression analysis provided prevalence ratios (PRs) of disordered eating adjusting for age, marital status, income, body mass index and recent distress. RESULTS: Pronounced sex differences were associated with eating disorder risk (PRs 4.89-11.04; all P values <.0001). Findings of particular interest included significantly higher PRs for eating disorder risk in males associated with gambling (PR 5.07, P<.0001) and for females associated with steroid and inhalant use as well as suicide thoughts and attempts (PRs 5.40-5.48, all P values <.0001). DISCUSSION: The findings from this detailed exploration of sex differences and eating disorder risk among psychiatric conditions, compulsive behaviors and substance use suggest that problem gambling, the use of inhalants and steroids and suicidal ideation in relationship to eating disorder risk warrant further investigation.
    General Hospital Psychiatry 04/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: There is a growing body of case reports of catatonic symptoms after organ transplantations. A considerable number of these cases might be attributed to neurotoxicity induced by immunosuppressive medications. However, the etiology of other cases remains unclear. We present the case of a 21-year-old woman, who developed catatonia after kidney transplantation from deceased donor. In this case non-toxic tacrolimus levels were found and other causal factors including infections, uremia or transplant rejection were excluded. Electroconvulsive therapy followed by olanzapine proved to be effective treatment.
    General Hospital Psychiatry 01/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Objective. This study aimed to explore the prevalence of CVDs risk factors in people with severe mental illness (SMI), estimating its weight on related risks in Southern Europe, an area with distinct dietary traditions. People with SMI may be more likely than general population to have high prevalence of risk factors for cardiovascular diseases (CVDs), due to several reasons, including poor health behaviours and psychopharmacological medications. Method. A cross-sectional study has been conducted, comparing inpatients with and without SMI. Univariate and multivariate analyses and logistic regression models have been carried out, exploring the effect of SMI on the prevalence of CVDs risk factors. Results. Although obesity and hypertriglyceridemia were more prevalent among people with SMI, controlling for relevant confounders in multivariate analyses we could not detect any significant difference. Conclusions. People with SMI may not necessarily have higher CVDs risk, as compared with general population. Mediterranean healthy dietary habits, universal health coverage, families providing strong support, all are possible explanations for our findings. Further research is needed, exploring different mechanisms, with more detailed biological and genetics measures.
    General Hospital Psychiatry 01/2014;
  • General Hospital Psychiatry 01/2012;
  • General Hospital Psychiatry 01/2012;
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    ABSTRACT: This study aimed to assess the impact of mental disorders on weight loss maintenance among initially successful weight losers who participated in a very-low-calorie diet program. A total of 251 obese individuals were assessed in a prospective longitudinal study over a period of 4 years. Mental disorders and eating patterns were assessed by structured interviews at baseline and by standardized questionnaires at baseline (T(1)), after 1 year (T(2)) and on 3-year follow-up (T(3)). Analyses were performed with an intention-to-treat method. Based on the intention-to-treat sample, 166 successful weight losers at T(2) (weight loss > or = 10%) were identified. Of those, 47 (28.3%) maintained a weight loss of > or = 5% of their pretreatment weight, whereas 119 (71.7%) maintained a loss of less than 5% of their pretreatment weight at T(3). History of substance abuse/dependence disorder and grazing prior to treatment increased the likelihood of successful weight loss maintenance. High levels of cognitive control, low levels of disinhibition on 3-year follow-up and initial body mass index also were associated with successful weight loss maintenance. Strategies that helped individuals overcome earlier mental disorders might help to establish better self-regulation and maintain high cognitive control of eating and subsequently increase the possibility of maintaining weight loss in the long run.
    General Hospital Psychiatry 01/2010; 32(2):132-40.
  • General Hospital Psychiatry 01/2010; 32:433-442.
  • General Hospital Psychiatry 01/2010; 32(3):337.
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    ABSTRACT: Clozapine is contraindicated in patients who experienced cardiac adverse effects during therapy. A young male (34 years old) with clozapine-responsive schizophrenia developed hypokinetic cardiomyopathy during treatment. The decision to resume clozapine therapy and to treat cardiac problems with carvedilol and captopril was made due to the failure of other antipsychotics to control symptoms. He was followed up for 5 years. Significant improvement of psychiatric conditions and persistence of normal left ventricular function were obtained with combination treatment. beta-Blockers and ACE inhibitors may allow resumption of clozapine in refractory schizophrenia in whom it was withdrawn for cardiotoxicity. A large-scale investigation may be useful to confirm the present observations.
    General Hospital Psychiatry 01/2008; 30(3):280-3.
  • General Hospital Psychiatry 01/2008; 28(1):1-2.
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    ABSTRACT: To examine the role of alexithymia (difficulties identifying one's emotions) in understanding the link between PTSD symptoms and negative health outcomes in sexually victimized female veterans. We hypothesized that having experienced multiple types of sexual trauma across the lifespan, experiencing greater severity of PTSD symptoms, and reporting difficulties in identifying emotions would be associated with increased negative health outcomes. Anonymous cross-sectional survey of a convenience sample of 456 female veterans enrolled in a VA clinic within the prior year. Data collected included demographics, lifetime trauma exposure, psychological and medical symptoms, emotion recognition problems (alexithymia), health-risk behaviors, and health care utilization. A total of 57.5% of participants reported a lifetime history of sexual trauma. After controlling for sexual trauma history, PTSD symptoms, and other well-established predictors of health care utilization in the VA medical system such as pre-disposing, enabling and need-based factors, hierarchical regression analyses showed that alexithymia independently explained unique variance in participants' physical health complaints and in their odds of reporting at least one outpatient urgent care visit in the past year. These data suggest that emotion recognition problems may contribute to poorer health outcomes in sexually traumatized women veterans beyond what is explained by sexual trauma exposure, health risk behaviors and PTSD. Psychological interventions that enhance emotion identification skills for women who have experienced sexual trauma could improve health perceptions and reduce need for acute health care.
    General Hospital Psychiatry 01/2008; 30(2):162-70.
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    ABSTRACT: The study aimed at exploring prevalence and risk factors of inpatient suicides and attempted suicides in a psychiatric hospital. Based on the German psychiatric basic documentation system, 20,543 patients with 40,451 episodes of inpatient care (1995-2004) in a psychiatric state hospital were included. Besides univariate analyses, multivariate logistic regression analyses and classification and regression tree analyses were performed. Forty-one inpatient suicides were recorded. Risk of inpatient suicide is increased for patients with resistance to psychopharmacological treatment, previous suicide attempt, severe side effects and supportive psychotherapy before admission. Two hundred fourteen inpatient suicide attempts occurred during the 10-year period. Risk factors of inpatient suicide attempt are assault, personality disorder, previous suicide attempt, psychopharmacological treatment resistance, suicidal thoughts at admission, schizophrenia, depression, female sex and length of stay. The identified risk factors underline the need for a cautious investigation of previous suicide attempts as well as for giving special attention to patients who have problems with psychopharmacotherapy during hospitalization.
    General Hospital Psychiatry 01/2008; 30(4):324-30.

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