Journal of Oral Implantology

Publisher: American Academy of Implant Dentistry; American Academy of Implant Prosthodontics; AAID Research Foundation

Description

The principal aim of the Journal of Oral Implantology is directed toward bringing information of interest to scientists, clinicians, laboratory owners and technicians, manufacturers, and educators. Journal of the American Academy of Implant Dentistry.

  • Impact factor
    1.15
  • 5-year impact
    0.00
  • Cited half-life
    8.00
  • Immediacy index
    0.14
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
    0.00
  • Website
    Journal of Oral Implantology website
  • Other titles
    The Journal of oral implantology, Oral implantology
  • ISSN
    0160-6972
  • OCLC
    3693079
  • Material type
    Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Journal / Magazine / Newspaper, Internet Resource

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Abstract Small diameter, or mini, dental implants have been successfully used to support removable and fixed oral prostheses. These implants impart about twice the per square millimeter force on the supporting bone and this should be addressed during treatment planning. In the posterior jaws, bite forces are of a higher magnitude than in the anterior jaws and may induce an overload of the supporting bone and failure of the osseointegration. Thus there should not be occlusal contact in functional excursions that induce off axial loads. The cases presented herein demonstrate that mini dental implants may successfully be used to support fixed partial dentures in mandibular sites in highly selected patients. Attention should be addressed as to the bone density of the site, very slow seating rotation of the implant with intermissions or cooling during insertion, observation of a four month healing time, flapless placement, treatment of any existing periodontitis, an insoluble cement and exclusion of occlusal contact in functional excursions. Importantly, a narrow, rounded occlusal table should be used to minimize off axial loads and an insoluble luting cement should be used to prevent loosening of the crowns due to dissolution of the cement and an overload of the retained implant with any residual cement-retained in the retainer. The implant that supports the cement retained retainer will be subjected to leveraged rotation that may destroy the osseointegration and result in exfoliation of the implant.
    Journal of Oral Implantology 04/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract Peri-implantitis is generally regarded as bacterial infections of the peri-implant tissue, which results in the peri-implant bone loss and eventual implant loss. Several surgical and nonsurgical therapies have been proposed to treat peri-implantitis with various degrees of success. Most of the therapies emphasize the importance of lesion debridement, infected implant surfaces decontamination, and oral hygiene maintenance. This article describes a case of severe peri-implantitis in the esthetic zone that was treated through surgical approaches. Complete debridement, implantoplasty, and decontamination procedures were used to detoxify the affected implant surfaces. Guided bone regeneration and soft tissue augmentation were performed to mend the peri-implant tissues. The treatment arrested the progression of peri-implantitis and regenerated the loss bone. Good oral hygiene, improved peri-implant tissues, and regular follow-ups contributed the long-term stability of the treatment outcomes.
    Journal of Oral Implantology 04/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract An alveolar cleft often displays the furrowed shape of the buccal site because of the lack of alveolar bone and gingival contracts. A 35-year-old woman presented with a repaired cleft lip and a non-grafted alveolar cleft associated with a missing lateral incisor on the left side of the maxilla. The central incisor had been an abutment tooth of a bridge for 15 years; however, it fractured and was extracted. Orthodontic treatment was antecedent to implant reconstruction because the edentulous space was not adequate for a single tooth replacement. As the palate was closed by the mucosa, bone grafting was not performed at the cleft site beforehand. Dental implant placement was performed within the narrowed, beamlike bone, and hydroxyapatite particles were used to augment the ridge. A relaxing incision and expansion of the invaginated mucosa improved the buccal shape of the gum. The usage of a narrow-type implant and bone substitutes facilitated the minimization of surgical stress, even though she did not undergo autologous bone-grafting surgery. Additionally, the aesthetical reconstruction of the anterior region significantly improved her quality of life at the 3-year follow-up.
    Journal of Oral Implantology 04/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract The present study assesses histopathologically and histomorphometrically the effects of light-emitting diode (LED) photobiomodulation therapy (LPT) on bone healing in BioOss® filled femoral defects of rats. It has been reported that LPT modulates cellular metabolic processes, leading to an enhanced regenerative potential for biological tissues. Thirty-six male Wistar rats with femoral bone defects were divided into four groups: Defect Group (empty bone defect, without application of LPT); Graft Group (bone defect filled with BioOss®, without application of LPT); (Defect+LPT) Group (empty bone defect, with application of LPT) and (Graft+LPT) Group (bone defect filled with BioOss®, with application of LPT). An OsseoPulse® LED device (wavelength: 618 nm; output power: 20 mW/cm2) was initiated 24 h post-surgery and performed every 24 h for 7, 14, and 21 days. LPT applied and BioOss® filled defects presented a higher amount of new bone formation with trabeculae formation. These defects showed statistically significant lower values of inflammation severity and fewer remnants of biomaterial were present. Within the limitations of this study, LPT has positive effects on bone healing histopathologically and histomorphometrically for the defects filled with BioOss® 3 weeks after the rats' femora injury.
    Journal of Oral Implantology 04/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract Background: Narrow diameter implants (NDIs) are increasingly produced and used in implant dentistry especially since the introduction of new and more resistant materials. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the clinical performance of NDIs (3.3 mm) placed in thin alveolar crests. Methods: Twenty consecutive patients needing implant-supported fixed partial dentures and presenting an alveolar thickness ≤ 6 mm were treated with one or several NDIs. The surgical protocol was chosen according to the clinical situation: °1 flapless; °2 mini-cervical flap; 3° wide flap; 4° wide flap + guided bone regeneration (GBR). Implants were immediately loaded if the primary stability was higher than 20 Ncm. Implant survival and success, prosthodontic success rates and patient-centered outcomes were evaluated after a follow-up period of 1 year. Results: A total of 39 implants were placed in 20 patients, 12 and 27 implants in the anterior regions and in the posterior mandible, respectively. All implants but one reached an insertion torque higher than 20 Ncm and were loaded within 48 hours. The implant survival and success rates both reached 94.7 %. The need for GBR was avoided in 60 % of the implant sites. The mean peri-implant bone remodeling after a follow-up period of 1 year was -0.35 mm at the implant level. Peri-implant bone remodeling was higher in the posterior region, when the alveolar crest was thinner than 4 mm and GBR was required in addition.Conclusion: The use of NDIs to restore partial edentation in sites with limited horizontal bone thickness seems to be an effective treatment option that prevented GBR in the majority of the present cases. Immediate provisionalization of NDIs does not seem to impair the results.
    Journal of Oral Implantology 04/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract Introduction: Resonance frequency analysis (RFA) using the Osstell device (Osstell AB, Gothenburg, Sweden) has been advocated for quantifying implant stability on a relative scale of implant stability quotients (ISQ). It was the goal of this prospective clinical study to evaluate whether a certain ISQ level at the time an implant is placed correlates with successful osseointegration as some have claimed.Materials and Methods: 495 implants (Straumann AG, Basel, Switzerland) varying in length and diameter were placed in a private practice strictly adhering to the implant manufacturer's surgical protocol. After placement and after healing periods of 42 days in the mandible and 56 days (implant manufacturer's protocol) in the maxilla, implant stability was measured using RFA. After healing, implants were torqued forward at 35Ncm and allowed to heal further if the patients felt discomfort. Statistical analysis of the data obtained was based on Welch tests and Kolmogorow-Smirnow tests (level of significance α=0.05).Results: 432 implants were osseointegrated after the predefined healing periods while eight implants were lost and in 55 cases healing was prolonged. Both at insertion (p = 0.025) and after healing (p < 0.001), successful implants showed significantly different ISQ values as compared to implant failures or implants with prolonged healing. However, overlapping ISQ distributions at implant insertion demonstrated that there was no correlation among the data that could be used to predict successful osseointegration.Discussion: Within the limits of this study the prognostic value of ISQ values appears to be ambiguous.
    Journal of Oral Implantology 04/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract The objective of the present study is the evaluation of the comprehensive 5-year results of fixed mandibular dentures fabricated from metal-acrylic or metal-ceramics according to the 'All-on-4'™ protocol. Twenty-seven patients that received immediately loaded 'All-on-4'™ fixed mandibular dentures in 2005 were included in the study, and they were evaluated up to 5 years after denture integration. Endpoints were chosen in accordance with the 2007 Pisa consensus and included bone resorption, the Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP), the Sulcus Fluid Flow Rate (SFFR), and prosthodontic complications. The initial situation in both groups was largely identical. Bone loss remained under 2 mm after 5 years in all implants and showed no group difference. The SSFR showed a gradual increase in both groups, and acrylic-bearing implants showed a substantially and significantly higher flow rate from the third year onward. The subjective improvement as expressed by the OHIP score was immediate and dramatic, and it showed no group differences. All acrylic restorations showed some extent of abrasion, and veneer fractures occurred in 4 patients (28.6%). Besides a single fracture of a fixation screw, there were no prosthetic complications in patients with ceramic suprastructures. According to bone loss and subjective outcome, acrylic and ceramic suprastructures apperared to be equivalent after 5 years; however, sulcus flow and prosthodontic complications suggest that the economic advantage of acrylic dentures may be specious. The rational choice of implant suprastructures requires comprehensive, long-term observation. Short-term economical benefits might be cancelled out in the long run.
    Journal of Oral Implantology 04/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract The aim of the present study was to evaluate the long-term outcome of immediately loaded full-arch fixed one-piece prostheses supported by dental implants inserted in completely edentulous maxillae and mandibles. Twenty-eight completely edentulous jaws in 27 patients were treated with screw-fixed provisional prostheses on the same day as implant insertion. A total of 189 implants were inserted into the jaws of the patients. All provisional prostheses were the one-piece bridge type and were made with acrylic resin. Final restoration was performed more than 2 months after surgery. Implant survival rate, prosthesis success rate, and complications during the follow-up period were evaluated. Implant size (diameter and length) and bone quality (Hounsfield units) of the region of the implant were also analyzed. The mean follow-up time was 77.9 months. The cumulative survival rate of the implants was 100%, and the success rate of the prostheses was also 100% during the observation time. Although three types of minor complications occurred in 10 cases (10/28; 35.7%), no major complications were found. Immediate loading of dental implants produces an equivalent outcome as that reported in previous studies that used conventional loading. We believe that this study not only adds to the immediate loading data but also confirms that the immediate loading technique may be most advantageous strategy for edentulous patients.
    Journal of Oral Implantology 04/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract Purpose: the aim of the present study was to use cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) to assess horizontal bone augmentation using block grafts, harvested from either iliac crest (IC) or mandibular ramus (MR) combined with particulate xenograft and a collagen membrane for in the severe maxillary anterior ridge defects [cases class III-IV (according to Cadwood and Howell´s classification)].Material and methods: An overall of 14 healthy partially edentulous patients requiring extensive horizontal bone reconstruction in the anterior maxilla were selected for the study. A total of 19 onlay block grafts (from IC or MR) were placed. The amount of horizontal bone gain was recorded by CBCT at 3 levels (5, 7 and 11 mm from the residual ridge) and at the time of bone grafting as well as the time of implant placement (≈ 5 months).Results: Both block donor sites provided enough ridge width for proper implant placement. Nonetheless, IC had significantly greater ridge width gain than MR (student t test)[4.93 mm, vs. 3.23 mm]. This is further confirmed by non-parametric Mann-Whitney test (p=0.007) due to the small sample size. Moreover, mean "pristine ridge" and "grafted ridge" values showed a direct association (Spearman coefficient of correlation= 0.336).Conclusion: A combination of block graft, obtained from with iliac crest or mandibular ramus, particulate xenograft then covered with an absorbable collagen membrane is a predictable technique for augmenting anterior maxillary horizontal ridge deficiency.
    Journal of Oral Implantology 04/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract Background: Significant vertical space which has not been corrected with vertical ridge augmentation, may necessitate selection of longer abutments which would lead to an increased vertical cantilever.Purpose: This study investigated the influence of different heights of abutment collar on screw loosening of single-unit dental implants after cyclic loading.Material and methods: Fifteen implant-abutment assemblies each consisted of an internal hexagonal implant were randomly assigned to three groups. Three groups were arranged, Group1 consisted of five abutments with 1.5 mm gingival height (GH); Group2, five abutments with 3.5 mm gingival height, and Group3 consisted five abutments with 5.5 mm gingival height. Each specimen was mounted in transparent auto-polymerizing acrylic resin block and abutment screw was tightened to 35 N.cm with an electric torque wrench. After 5 minutes, Initial Torque Loss (ITL) was recorded for all specimens. Metal crowns were fabricated with 45oocclusal surface and were placed on the abutments. A cyclic load of 75 N and frequency of 1HZ was applied perpendicular to the long axis of each specimen. After 500000 cycles, Secondary Torque Loss (STL) was recorded. One way ANOVA analysis was used to evaluate the effects of abutment collar height before and after cyclic loading.Results: One-way ANOVA showed that ITL among the groups was not significantly different (P=.52), while STL was significantly different among three groups (P=.008). Post Hoc Tukey HSD Tests showed that STL values were significantly different between the abutments with 1.5 mm GH (Group1) and with 5.5 mm GH (Group3) (P=.007). Also, Paired comparison t-test showed that cyclic loading significantly influenced the STL in comparison with the ITL in each group. Conclusion: Within the limitation of this study, it can be concluded that increase in height of abutment collar could adversely affect the torque loss of abutment screw.
    Journal of Oral Implantology 04/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract ABSTRACT: Maxillofacial traumatic injuries can damage the jaw, teeth, and soft tissues of the head and neck region. When these injuries occur, best practice is to reconstruct as comprehensively as is clinically prudent at time of injury. Smart and efficient procedures during the initial surgery can minimize subsequent reconstructive procedures in scope and number, minimize expense, and result in a better final aesthetic and functional outcome. Restoration of anterior alveolar jaw fractures with comminuted or avulsed segments becomes a complex prospect when left untreated after initial trauma or injury, and can result in alveolar ridge defects that are difficult and cumbersome to repair. This case report details one 19-year-old female who suffered a traumatic injury in these areas, and has a best result outcome because of immediate reconstruction efforts involving a bone block autograft to preserve alveolar process anatomy.
    Journal of Oral Implantology 04/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Because the biomechanical behavior of dental implants is different from that of natural tooth, clinical problems may occur. The mechanism of stress distribution and load transfer to the implant/bone interface is a critical issue affecting the success rate of implants. Therefore, the aim of this study was to conduct a brief literature review of the available stress analysis methods to study implant-supported prosthesis loading and to discuss their contributions in the biomechanical evaluation of oral rehabilitation with implants. Several studies have used experimental, analytical, and computational models by means of finite element models (FEM), photoelasticity, strain gauges and associations of these methods to evaluate the biomechanical behavior of dental implants. The FEM has been used to evaluate new components, configurations, materials, and shapes of implants. The greatest advantage of the photoelastic method is the ability to visualize the stresses in complex structures, such as oral structures, and to observe the stress patterns in the whole model, allowing the researcher to localize and quantify the stress magnitude. Strain gauges can be used to assess in vivo and in vitro stress in prostheses, implants, and teeth. Some authors use the strain gauge technique with photoelasticity or FEM techniques. These methodologies can be widely applied in dentistry, mainly in the research field. Therefore, they can guide further research and clinical studies by predicting some disadvantages and streamlining clinical time.
    Journal of Oral Implantology 04/2014; 40(2):217-228.
  • Journal of Oral Implantology 04/2014; 40(2):115-116.
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    ABSTRACT: Numerous factors may keep surgeons from placing implants in the anterior maxilla in order to avoid suboptimal restorative outcomes. This paper describes a technique of an autogenous-free gingival-bone block graft, which allows bone and gingival augmentation and a primary seal to be achieved simultaneously. Additionally, it describes a technique for achieving primary soft tissue closure of maxillary extraction sockets using a rotated pedicle palatal connective tissue flap.
    Journal of Oral Implantology 04/2014; 40(2):183-187.
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract Alveolar bone regeneration associated with the local release of osteogenic protein (OP-1) from a polyethylene glycol (PEG) scaffold was evaluated in fourteen mini-pigs. Following extraction of mandibular teeth and a 26-weeks healing time-period standardized bone defects were created bilaterally in the posterior mandibles (3 sites for each hemi-mandible) that were randomLy assigned to treatment groups. Seven treatments groups were compared: Four different concentrations of the PEG/OP-1 test system (n=14 for each), a positive control (Collagen/OP-1, n=14), a negative control (PEG only, n=7) and non-treated defects (n=7). Each animal provided all test and control groups. The animals were sacrificed after 3 weeks of healing and samples were processed for histology and histomorphometry.Three weeks after implantation, there were positive clinical responses for all test groups. Earlier bone maturation was observed in the test groups that had higher concentrations of OP-1 (0.25, 0.5 or 1 mg/mL) compared to the negative control group (PEG alone), the low concentration group (0.1 mg/mL) and the positive control group (Collagen/OP-1). However, histomorphometric quantitative analyses did not reveal any statistical difference between any of the groups. No residual PEG biomaterial or inflammatory responses to the biomaterial or growth factor were observed.This study confirmed the safe local delivery of OP-1 from PEG hydrogel. Alveolar bone regeneration was not statistically different between tests groups, negative control (PEG alone) or commercial positive control (Collagen/OP-1). The semi-quantitative analysis, however, showed a trend in favor of the higher concentrations of OP1 to induce faster bone maturation.
    Journal of Oral Implantology 03/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract Regulations for protecting humans against stochastic biological effects from ionizing radiation are based on the Linear No-Threshold (LNT) risk assessment model that any amount of radiation exposure may lead to cancer in a population. Based on the LNT model, risk from low dose radiation increases linearly with increasing doses of radiation. Imaging procedures in medicine and dentistry are an important source of low dose ionizing radiation. The increased utilization of computed tomography (CT) and cone beam computed tomography(CBCT) has raised health concerns regarding exposure to low dose ionizing radiation. In oral and maxillofacial surgery and implant dentistry, CBCT is now at the forefront of this controversy. Although caution has been expressed, there have been no direct studies linking radiation exposure from CT and CBCT used in dental imaging with cancer induction. This manuscript describes the concerns about radiation exposure in dental imaging regarding the use of computed tomography.
    Journal of Oral Implantology 03/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract Purpose: There are some anatomical restrictions in which implants are not possible to be inserted in their conventional configuration. Offset placement of implants in relation to the prosthetic unit could be a treatment solution. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the offset placement of implant-supported prosthesis on the stress distribution around a dental implant using 3D finite element analysis. Materials and Methods: 3D finite element models of implant placement in the position of a mandibular molar with four configurations (0, 0.5, 1, 1.5 mm offset) were created in order to investigate resultant stress/strain distribution. A vertical load of 100 N was applied on the center of the crown of the models. Results: The least stress in peri-implant tissue was found in in-line configuration (0mm offset). Stress concentration in the peri-implant tissue increased by increasing the amount of offset placement. Maximum stress concentration in all models was detected at the neck of the implant. Conclusion: It can be concluded that the offset placement of a single dental implant does not offer biomechanical advantages regarding reducing stress concentration over the in-line implant configuration. It is suggested that the amount of offset should be as minimum as possible.
    Journal of Oral Implantology 03/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract Aim: To accurately portray the risk management of a patient presenting with mandibular osteonecrosis following bisphosphonate exposure and immediate loading of dental implant treatment. This case report describes a 58-year-old African American female having experienced previous success of implant osseointegration in the maxilla, sought similar mandibular treatment four years later and had been taking bisphosphonate for a total 5 years. All existing mandibular teeth were extracted and 6 Brånemark System implants were placed and immediately loaded without complication. Two weeks postoperative, a slower rate of healing was noticed. Over a period of six weeks, the patient's condition worsened. An extraoral fistula exuded from a lesion on the left inferior border of the mandible. The patient was diagnosed with bisphosphonate-induced osteonecrosis of the jaw (BONJ) and discontinued bisphosphonate medication indefinitely. The patient was treated for BONJ and four of the six implants which were encapsulated in tissue were removed. She ceased the oral Fosamax therapy for two and a half years following the BONJ, and had morning-fasting serum C-terminal telopeptide (CTX) test of 457 pg/ml* which showed her bone turnover rate had returned to normal levels. Four new Brånemark System implants were placed in the mandible and were immediately loaded. Four months later, a screw-retained implant-supported final prosthesis was delivered. The patient has been followed for 5 years from the time of retreatment of mandibular arch and 11 years from time of implant placement in the maxillary arch. All postoperative evaluations have been uneventful. This case report demonstrated how management of BONJ can lead to successful retreatment with implants after a drug holiday, and how being cognizant to the length of time of Fosamax therapy can help clinicians avoid BONJ complications.
    Journal of Oral Implantology 03/2014;

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