Motivation and Emotion (MOTIV EMOTION )

Publisher: Springer Verlag

Description

Motivation and Emotion publishes theoretical papers and original research reports of either a basic or applied nature from any area of psychology and behavioral science provided that the focus is on motivation and/or emotion. While the primary orientation of the journal is on human emotion and motivation animal studies are also published provided they are relevant to general motivation and/or emotion theory.

  • Impact factor
    1.55
  • 5-year impact
    2.29
  • Cited half-life
    9.90
  • Immediacy index
    0.09
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
    1.00
  • Website
    Motivation and Emotion website
  • Other titles
    Motivation and emotion (Online)
  • ISSN
    0146-7239
  • OCLC
    45254375
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Springer Verlag

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Authors own final version only can be archived
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • On author's website or institutional repository
    • On funders designated website/repository after 12 months at the funders request or as a result of legal obligation
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set phrase to accompany link to published version (The original publication is available at www.springerlink.com)
    • Articles in some journals can be made Open Access on payment of additional charge
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: According to motivational intensity theory, energy investment in goal pursuit is determined by the motivation to avoid wasting energy. Two experiments tested this hypothesis by manipulating the difficulty of an isometric and grip task across four levels in a between-persons (Study 1) and a within-persons (Study 2) design. Supporting motivational intensity theory’s prediction, the results showed that invested energy—indicated by exerted grip force—was a function of task difficulty: The higher the difficulty, the higher the energy investment. However, the data also indicated that participants invested considerably more energy than required, questioning the primacy of energy conservation.
    Motivation and Emotion 10/2014;
  • Motivation and Emotion 10/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Prior research on intrinsic versus extrinsic values has focused on the comparative importance subjects assign to the two types of values, showing that relative intrinsic versus extrinsic value orientation (RIEVO) predicts higher or increased well-being. In two studies, we show that rated action taken regarding the two types of values is just as essential to study. Support was found for four hypotheses: (1) there was a significant behavior/importance gap, such that participants “walked” (acted on values) less than they “talked” (endorsed those values); (2) this was especially true for intrinsic values, an interaction suggesting that the intrinsic ideals of personal growth, community, and connection often receive only lip service; (3) the “walk” (behavior ratings) measure of RIEVO subsumed the “talk” (importance ratings) RIEVO measure’s effects on well-being outcomes, suggesting that researchers interested in predicting well-being from values should perhaps focus on rated value enactment, not value importance; and (4) participants with higher meaning in life, lower search for meaning, more self-concordance at work, and greater chronological age evidenced more consistency between their talking and their walking.
    Motivation and Emotion 10/2014; 38(5).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Empathy is a concept whose history has been marred by conceptual inconsistencies. Dispositional measures of empathy have varied in constituent subscales and have been suggested to conflate with other related constructs. The current investigation consists of correlational and exploratory factor analyses with self-report empathy measures to assess the commonalities between these measures. Four hundred ninety-seven university undergraduates completed a battery of self-report dispositional empathy measures, along with situational and dispositional sympathy measures. The novel findings include moderate correlations between scales purporting to measure empathy, an interpretable six-factor structure which represent subcomponents of these empathy scales, and the modest ability of existing questionnaires to contribute to these factor structures. The retained factor structure is not consistent with previous definitions of empathy, and it appears that self-report empathy measures do not adequately measure a uniform, consistent construct.
    Motivation and Emotion 10/2014; 38(5).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In this research, we propose that emotions are affected not only by appraisals, but also by a metacognitive sense of confidence versus doubt over the appraisals. Focusing on core-relational themes (CRTs), higher-order appraisals comprising the combined meaning of several appraisals, we predicted and found evidence, over two studies, that the effect of a CRT on the corresponding emotion is stronger if one feels confident about the validity of the CRT compared to feeling doubtful. In Study 1, CRT was manipulated by recall and in Study 2, CRT was manipulated in vivo. Both designs produced consistent support for the hypotheses. These findings demonstrate the need to consider metacognitive processes in understanding the effects of appraisals on emotions.
    Motivation and Emotion 10/2014; 38(5).
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    ABSTRACT: Trivers (1972) proposed that evolutionary factors should favor divergent mating strategies for males versus females. Such differences may be less pronounced among human beings than other animals and social norms and sex roles are also pertinent influences. The present experiment (N = 133 college undergraduates, 74 female) sought to bypass some of these other influences. Participants were randomly assigned to a condition designed to increase attention to the genital region (a downward pointing arrow) or not (an upward pointing arrow). They then reported on their interest in shortterm (e.g., a one-night stand) and long-term (e.g., a potential marital partner) mating opportunities. A theory-consistent three-way interaction occurred such that the genital salience manipulation primed a shorter-term reproductive strategy among men and a longer-term reproductive strategy among women. The results provide unique support for evolution-linked ideas about sex differences in the form of a role for bodily attention.
    Motivation and Emotion 09/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: This investigation examined the influence of negative affective reactions on the perceived likelihood of experiencing a health risk. Concepts related to formaldehyde exposure were paired with negative stimuli to create affective reactions. In Study 1, perceived risk was reduced when the thought of formaldehyde exposure elicited negative affective reactions compared to a control condition and participants were less interested in information on the risk and recommended spending less money to alleviate the hazard. The potential boundary condition of emotional states was examined in Study 2. Sad or neutral emotion was elicited before learning about the hazard, which was again paired with negative stimuli or no affective stimuli. Sadness increased perceived risk; negative affective reactions reduced perceived risk only when participants were in a neutral incidental state. These findings suggest that negative affective reactions reduce the perceived likelihood of risk, but only in the absence of alternative emotional information.
    Motivation and Emotion 08/2014; 38(4).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The behavioral inhibition system (BIS), behavioral approach system (BAS), and fight-flight-freeze system (FFFS) are motivational systems that guide people’s behavior. Motivational systems may be relevant to contexts of interpersonal communication, specifically those requiring social support. In these situations, people express preferences for approaching versus avoiding and emotion versus problem-focused comfort. This paper links people’s preferences for supportive strategies with their motivational systems. 335 participants reported their preferences for different strategies of social support and their motivational system orientations. As expected, BAS was associated with preferences for involving, problem-focused support. BIS, BAS, and FFFS were significantly associated with emotion-focused support, and FFFS was negatively associated with comfort that downplays affect. The motivational systems interact when manifesting associations with preferences for support strategies, and the BAS reward responsiveness subscale emerged as the most influential BAS subscale. These results indicate that BIS, BAS, and FFFS influence people’s preferences in contexts of interpersonal communication.
    Motivation and Emotion 08/2014; 38(4).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In a sample of 325 college students, we examined how context influences judgments of facial expressions of emotion, using a newly developed facial affect recognition task in which emotional faces are superimposed upon emotional and neutral contexts. This research used a larger sample size than previous studies, included more emotions, varied the intensity level of the expressed emotion to avoid potential ceiling effects from very easy recognition, did not explicitly direct attention to the context, and aimed to understand how recognition is influenced by non-facial information, both situationally-relevant and situationally-irrelevant. Both accuracy and RT varied as a function of context. For all facial expressions of emotion other than happiness, accuracy increased when the emotion of the face and context matched, and decreased when they mismatched. For all emotions, participants responded faster when the emotion of the face and image matched and slower when they mismatched. Results suggest that the judgment of the facial expression is itself influenced by the contextual information instead of both being judged independently and then combined. Additionally, the results have implications for developing models of facial affect recognition and indicate that there are factors other than the face that can influence facial affect recognition judgments.
    Motivation and Emotion 08/2014; 38(4).