Alcoholism Clinical and Experimental Research Journal Impact Factor & Information

Publisher: Research Society on Alcoholism (U.S.); National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence (U.S.); International Society for Biomedical Research on Alcoholism, Wiley

Journal description

Founded by the National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence, this journal gives readers direct access to the most significant and current findings on the nature and management of this serious health problem. Each month Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research brings health care professionals and researchers the latest clinical studies and research findings on alcoholism, alcohol-induced syndromes and organ damage. Pertinent current papers in the major categories of basic science, clinical research, and treatment methods are included in each issue.

Current impact factor: 3.31

Impact Factor Rankings

2015 Impact Factor Available summer 2015
2013 / 2014 Impact Factor 3.311
2012 Impact Factor 3.421
2011 Impact Factor 3.343
2010 Impact Factor 3.468
2009 Impact Factor 3.392
2008 Impact Factor 3.166
2007 Impact Factor 3.175
2006 Impact Factor 2.933
2005 Impact Factor 2.636
2004 Impact Factor 2.508
2003 Impact Factor 2.421
2002 Impact Factor 2.355
2001 Impact Factor 2.674
2000 Impact Factor 2.323
1999 Impact Factor 2.013
1998 Impact Factor 2.14
1997 Impact Factor 1.875
1996 Impact Factor 2.294
1995 Impact Factor 2.31
1994 Impact Factor 2.065
1993 Impact Factor 2.164
1992 Impact Factor 1.961

Impact factor over time

Impact factor
Year

Additional details

5-year impact 3.62
Cited half-life 8.20
Immediacy index 0.64
Eigenfactor 0.02
Article influence 1.03
Website Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research website
Other titles Alcoholism (Baltimore, Md.: Online), Alcoholism, ACER
ISSN 0145-6008
OCLC 44003050
Material type Document, Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Wiley

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author cannot archive a post-print version
  • Restrictions
    • 12 months embargo
  • Conditions
    • Some journals have separate policies, please check with each journal directly
    • On author's personal website, institutional repositories, arXiv, AgEcon, PhilPapers, PubMed Central, RePEc or Social Science Research Network
    • Author's pre-print may not be updated with Publisher's Version/PDF
    • Author's pre-print must acknowledge acceptance for publication
    • On a non-profit server
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Publisher source must be acknowledged with citation
    • Must link to publisher version with set statement (see policy)
    • If OnlineOpen is available, BBSRC, EPSRC, MRC, NERC and STFC authors, may self-archive after 12 months
    • If OnlineOpen is available, AHRC and ESRC authors, may self-archive after 24 months
    • Publisher last contacted on 07/08/2014
    • This policy is an exception to the default policies of 'Wiley'
  • Classification
    ​ yellow

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Background: Previous work examining college drinking tendencies has identified a disproportionately small (20%), but uniquely high-risk group of students who experience nearly 50% of the reported alcohol-related consequences (i.e., the multiple repeated consequences, or MRC, group). With the goal of reducing drinking-related consequences later in college, the current study sought to identify potential MRC group members in their first semester by examining: 1) early-risk subgroups based on analysis of early-risk screening constructs (e.g., age of drinking onset, middle school alcohol exposure, high school drinking and consequences); and 2) their association with MRC criteria early in the first semester of college. Methods: A random sample of 2021 first year college student drinkers (56% female) completed a web-based drinking survey in their first semester on campus. Results: Latent class analysis (LCA) revealed four early-risk subgroups: 1) an Early Onset Risk group who endorsed early age of drinking onset and engaged in heavy middle and high school drinking (10%); 2) a Late Onset Risk group who engaged in weekend drinking and drunkenness and experienced six or more unique consequences as seniors in high school (32%); 3) an Early Onset Limited Risk group who only endorsed early age of onset and middle school drinking (3%); and 4) a Minimal Risk group who did not engage in any early risk behaviors (55%). Members of both the Early and Late Onset Risk groups had significantly higher odds of MRC membership in their first semester of college (9.85 and 6.79 greater, respectively). Conclusions: Results suggest age of onset, middle and high school drinking and drunkenness, and frequency of unique consequences could be particularly useful in brief screening tools. Further, findings support early screening and prevention efforts for MRC membership prior to college matriculation. Keywords: early screening; high-risk college drinking; MRC group; alcohol-related consequences
    Alcoholism Clinical and Experimental Research 10/2015;
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    ABSTRACT: Background: In recent years, much attention has been given to the lack of reproducibility in biomedical research, particularly in preclinical animal studies. This is a problem that also plagues the alcohol research field, particularly in consistent consumption in animal models of alcohol use disorders. One often overlooked factor that could affect reproducibility is the maintenance diet used in preclinical studies. Methods: Herein, 2 well-established models of alcohol consumption, the “drinking in the dark” (DID) procedure and the continuous 2-bottle choice (C2BC) paradigm, were employed to determine the effects of diet on ethanol (EtOH) consumption. Male C57BL/6J mice were given 1 of 6 standard rodent chow diets obtained from Purina LabDiet®, Inc. (Prolab® RMH 3000) or Harlan® Laboratories, Inc. (Teklad Diets T.2916, T.2918, T.2920X, T.7912, or T.8940). A separate group of animals were used to test dietary effects on EtOH pharmacokinetics and behavioral measures following intraperitoneal (IP) injections of various doses of EtOH. Results: Mice eating Harlan diets T.2916 (H2916) and T.2920X (H2920) consumed significantly less EtOH and exhibited lower blood EtOH concentrations (BECs) during DID; however, during C2BC, animals maintained on Harlan T.7912 (H7912) consumed more EtOH and had a higher EtOH preference than the other diet groups. EtOH consumption levels did not stem from changes in alcohol pharmacokinetics, as a separate group of animals administered EtOH IP showed no difference in BECs. However, animals on Harlan diet T.2920X (H2920) were more sensitive to alcohol-induced locomotor activity in an open-field task. No diet-dependent differences were seen in alcohol-induced sedation as measured with loss of righting reflex. Conclusions: Although these data do not identify a specific mechanism, together, they clearly show that the maintenance diet impacts EtOH consumption. It is incumbent upon the research community to consider the importance of describing nutritional information in methods, which may help decrease interlaboratory reproducibility issues.
    Alcoholism Clinical and Experimental Research 06/2015; DOI:10.1111/acer.12773
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Neuronal plasticity deficits are thought to underlie abnormal neurodevelopment in fetal alcohol spectrum disorders and in animal models of this condition. Previously, we found that alcohol exposure during a period that is similar to the last months of gestation in humans disrupts ocular dominance plasticity (ODP), as measured in superficial cortical layers. We hypothesize that exposure to alcohol can differentially affect the potentiation and depression of responses that are necessary for activity-dependent sprouting and pruning of neuronal networks. ODP is an established paradigm that allows the assessment of activity-dependent depression and potentiation of responses in vivo. METHODS: Mouse pups were exposed to 3.6 to 5 g/kg of ethanol in saline daily or every other day between postnatal days 4 and 9. Visual cortex plasticity was then assessed during the critical period for ODP using 2 techniques that separately record in layers 4 (visually evoked potentials [VEPs]) and 2/3 (optical imaging of intrinsic signals [OI]). RESULTS: We discovered a layer-specific effect of early alcohol exposure. Recording of VEPs from layer 4 showed that while the potentiation component of ODP was disrupted in animals treated with alcohol when compared with saline controls, the depression component of ODP (Dc-ODP) was unaltered. In contrast, OI from layers 2/3 showed that Dc-ODP was markedly disrupted in alcohol-treated animals when compared with controls. CONCLUSIONS: Combined with our previous work, these findings strongly suggest that developmental alcohol exposure has a distinct and layer-specific effect on the potentiation and depression of cortical responses after monocular deprivation.
    Alcoholism Clinical and Experimental Research 06/2015; DOI:10.1111/acer.12775
  • Alcoholism Clinical and Experimental Research 06/2015; 39(S1):1A–327A.
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    ABSTRACT: Due to the difficulty encountered in disseminating resource-intensive emergency department (ED)-based brief alcohol interventions into real-world settings, this study evaluated the effect of a mailed personalized feedback intervention for problem drinking ED patients. At 6-week follow-up, this intervention was associated with a statistically significant reduction in alcohol consumption among patients with alcohol-involved ED presentations. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of this intervention over time. A randomized controlled trial was conducted among problem drinking ED patients, defined as those scoring 8 or more on the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test. Participants in the intervention group received mailed personalized feedback regarding their alcohol consumption. The control group received no feedback. Follow-up interviews were conducted over the phone, postal survey, or email survey 6 weeks and 6 months after baseline screening, and repeat ED presentations over 12-month follow-up were ascertained via linked ED records. Six-month follow-up interviews were completed with 210 participants (69%), and linked ED records were obtained for 286 participants (94%). The intervention had no effect on alcohol consumption, while findings regarding alcohol-related injuries and repeat ED presentations remain inconclusive. Further research in which the receipt of feedback is improved and a booster intervention is provided is recommended. Copyright © 2015 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.
    Alcoholism Clinical and Experimental Research 05/2015; 39(7):1260. DOI:10.1111/acer.12760
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Preliminary basic and human studies suggest that the α2 -adrenergic antagonist idazoxan may represent a novel medication for alcohol dependence. The goal of this study was to evaluate the safety and tolerability of the co-administration of idazoxan with alcohol and explore whether pharmacokinetics (PK) and biobehavioral mechanisms of idazoxan may alter alcohol's effects. METHODS: This was a preliminary double-blind, single-dose, placebo-controlled, crossover, randomized human laboratory study. Ten social drinkers were dosed, in 2 different alcohol challenge studies (ACS), with a single oral dose of idazoxan (40 mg) or placebo, followed by a fixed alcohol dose 60 minutes later. Participants returned after a 1-week washout, and they were crossed over to the opposite medication condition. RESULTS: There were no significant differences in adverse events between idazoxan and placebo. Moreover, during the ACS paradigm, 40 mg idazoxan was well tolerated with no significant autonomic effects compared to placebo; idazoxan reduced the peak blood alcohol level (p < 0.01) and time to peak (p < 0.05) compared to placebo. A PK/pharmacodynamic model aligned the biobehavioral effects, demonstrating that the co-administration of 40 mg idazoxan with alcohol decreased alcohol-related stimulation (p < 0.05) and increased alcohol-related sedation (p < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: This study supports the safety and tolerability of 40 mg idazoxan when co-administered with alcohol. Additionally, this study suggests that idazoxan may alter the biphasic effects of alcohol by decreasing stimulation and increasing sedation. These findings have implications for further investigation of using idazoxan as a probe to develop potential novel medications to treat alcoholic patients.
    Alcoholism Clinical and Experimental Research 04/2015; DOI:10.1111/acer.12658.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Background Preliminary basic and human studies suggest that the α2-adrenergic antagonist idazoxan may represent a novel medication for alcohol dependence. The goal of this study was to evaluate the safety and tolerability of the co-administration of idazoxan with alcohol and explore whether pharmacokinetics (PK) and biobehavioral mechanisms of idazoxan may alter alcohol's effects. Methods This was a preliminary double-blind, single-dose, placebo-controlled, crossover, randomized human laboratory study. Ten social drinkers were dosed, in 2 different alcohol challenge studies (ACS), with a single oral dose of idazoxan (40 mg) or placebo, followed by a fixed alcohol dose 60 minutes later. Participants returned after a 1-week washout, and they were crossed over to the opposite medication condition. Results There were no significant differences in adverse events between idazoxan and placebo. Moreover, during the ACS paradigm, 40 mg idazoxan was well tolerated with no significant autonomic effects compared to placebo; idazoxan reduced the peak blood alcohol level (p < 0.01) and time to peak (p < 0.05) compared to placebo. A PK/pharmacodynamic model aligned the biobehavioral effects, demonstrating that the co-administration of 40 mg idazoxan with alcohol decreased alcohol-related stimulation (p < 0.05) and increased alcohol-related sedation (p < 0.05). Conclusions This study supports the safety and tolerability of 40 mg idazoxan when co-administered with alcohol. Additionally, this study suggests that idazoxan may alter the biphasic effects of alcohol by decreasing stimulation and increasing sedation. These findings have implications for further investigation of using idazoxan as a probe to develop potential novel medications to treat alcoholic patients.
    Alcoholism Clinical and Experimental Research 04/2015; 39(4). DOI:10.1111/acer.12658
  • Alcoholism Clinical and Experimental Research 01/2015;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We investigated the population-level relationship between exposure to brand-specific advertising and brand-specific alcohol use among US youth. We conducted an internet survey of a national sample of 1031 youth, ages 13-20, who had consumed alcohol in the past 30 days. We ascertained all of the alcohol brands respondents consumed in the past 30 days, as well as which of 20 popular television shows they had viewed during that time period. Using a negative binomial regression model, we examined the relationship between aggregated brand-specific exposure to alcohol advertising on the 20 television shows [ad stock, measured in gross rating points (GRPs)] and youth brand-consumption prevalence, while controlling for the average price and overall market share of each brand. Brands with advertising exposure on the 20 television shows had a consumption prevalence about four times higher than brands not advertising on those shows. Brand-level advertising elasticity of demand varied by exposure level, with higher elasticity in the lower exposure range. The estimated advertising elasticity of 0.63 in the lower exposure range indicates that for each 1% increase in advertising exposure, a brand's youth consumption prevalence increases by 0.63%. At the population level, underage youths' exposure to brand-specific advertising was a significant predictor of the consumption prevalence of that brand, independent of each brand's price and overall market share. The non-linearity of the observed relationship suggests that youth advertising exposure may need to be lowered substantially in order to decrease consumption of the most heavily advertised brands. © The Author 2015. Medical Council on Alcohol and Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.
    Alcoholism Clinical and Experimental Research 07/2014; 38(8). DOI:10.1111/acer.12488
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    ABSTRACT: With few exceptions there has been a dearth of research evaluating the independent and combined effects of a promising medication and an effective behavioral intervention for alcohol problems. Few studies have incorporated both theory and empirical findings to ascertain how the combination of medication and behavioral intervention interact or work synergistically to produce better outcomes or why a particular combination of pharmacological and behavioral treatment works better than another combination or either of the interventions employed alone.
    Alcoholism Clinical and Experimental Research 07/2014; 38(8). DOI:10.1111/acer.12485
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    ABSTRACT: Alcohol dependence is common in bipolar disorder (BPD) and associated with treatment nonadherence, violence, and hospitalization. Quetiapine is a standard treatment for BPD. We previously reported improvement in depressive symptoms, but not alcohol use, with quetiapine in BPD and alcohol dependence. However, mean alcohol use was low and a larger effect size on alcohol-related measures was observed in those with higher levels of alcohol consumption. In this study, efficacy of quetiapine in patients with BPD and alcohol dependence was examined in patients with higher mean baseline alcohol use than in the prior study.
    Alcoholism Clinical and Experimental Research 06/2014; DOI:10.1111/acer.12445
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Sleep disturbances are both common and well-characterized in adults with alcohol use disorders (AUDs), but have received little study in adolescents with AUDs. Furthermore, a handful of studies suggest that sleep complaints are a risk factor for AUDs. However, no published studies have yet examined the longitudinal course of sleep complaints in adolescents with AUDs; in particular, it remains unclear how persistent AUD-associated sleep complaints are in this age group, and what types of sleep complaints are most relevant to alcohol-use symptoms. We investigated these questions in a 5-year longitudinal study of adolescents with and without AUDs at baseline.
    Alcoholism Clinical and Experimental Research 06/2014; 38(8). DOI:10.1111/acer.12474