Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development

Description

Journal of Multilingual & Multicultural Development. This well established journal publishes articles on the many aspects of multilingualism and multiculturalism. From the beginning it has aimed to range widely in all ways covering, for example, contributions to theory, reports of research studies, descriptions of educational policies and systems, and accounts of teaching or learning strategies and assessment procedures.

  • Impact factor
    0.60
  • 5-year impact
    0.00
  • Cited half-life
    0.00
  • Immediacy index
    0.32
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
    0.00
  • Website
    Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development website
  • Other titles
    Journal of multilingual and multicultural development (Online), JMMD
  • ISSN
    0143-4632
  • OCLC
    43413712
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publications in this journal

  • Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development 11/2014; 35(7).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This article is the guest editor's introduction to the special issue of the Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development on ‘Multilingual Literacy and Social Change in African Communities’. Norton examines the diverse contributions with reference to the United Nations’ Millennium Development Goals, formulated in 2000 to ‘make poverty history’ by 2015. Bamgbose argues convincingly that language is central in the struggle for educational progress, gender equality and improved health. Makoe and McKinney, for example, highlight continuities in language practices in post-apartheid South African schools, while Early and Norton address the challenges of teaching through English as medium in Uganda. As discussed by Sherris and colleagues, programmes like School for Life, which validate the local languages of out-of-school Ghanaian youth, are exemplary, and can be contrasted with the troubling pedagogical practices identified by Higgins in her HIV/AIDS educational research in Tanzania. The validation of local knowledge is also a theme in Namazzi and Kendrick, who insightfully address multimodal educational practices in Ugandan child-headed households. Lemphane and Prinsloo provide a window on the future, cautioning that the digital literacy practices of diverse youth can be indexical of social inequalities. The promotion of multilingual literacy remains an urgent priority in African education.
    Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development 11/2014; 35(7).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This article reports on a study focusing on the use of multilingual cultural resources in child-headed households (CHHs) in Uganda's Rakai District. Using funds of knowledge and sociocultural perspectives on children's learning, we documented through ethnographic observations and interviews how children in four CHHs used multilingual cultural resources at home. Our findings show that children co-construct, re-appropriate and remix stories, songs, riddles and proverbs from their cultural environment in situated ways that are a response to the changing context of their social worlds. The study provides a window onto the unique production and use of multilingual cultural resources in CHHs, and further speaks to the need for educators and policymakers to better understand the critical role of siblings in their own learning of linguistic and cultural knowledge.
    Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development 11/2014; 35(7).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This article examines the literacy events in HIV/AIDS education in Tanzania to investigate how they construct social identities for participants and to what extent they provide opportunities for critical health literacies. The projects took place as collaborative research partnerships with local Tanzanian NGOs in an effort to analyse and improve existing educational practices. Within the framework of multiliteracies, critical health literacies have the potential to engage individuals in the deconstruction of texts and the transformation of their social identities and social relations. Through taking an ethnographic approach to literacy events, I document and analyse the ways that educators convey information about HIV/AIDS and explore how target audiences participate in two kinds of literacy events: (1) instruction using written modes of language from official booklets and on blackboards and flipcharts and (2) breakout sessions in groups that the participants were often assigned, which involved writing out answers to key questions posed by the educators. My analysis shows a predominance of functional health literacy and a lack of pedagogical space for more critical engagements with the social and economic barriers to health that draw on the participants' own knowledge and experiences.
    Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development 11/2014; 35(7).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Although development goals are usually set as targets that must be achieved in a development process, experience with development goals in Africa has tended to underscore underperformance either in terms of a shortfall in the targets attained or in terms of inadequate pursuit of specific goals. To illustrate this syndrome, the African Union's New Partnership for African Development and the Millennium Development Goals will be used as a case study. Neither of them includes language as a significant factor in the realization of the expected goals. In fact, most of the inadequacies observed are often attributed to socioeconomic causes. In this paper, I argue that these inadequacies cannot be fully accounted for without reference to the role of language coupled with attendant sociocultural constraints. By their very nature, virtually all the goals require participation by the populace, and the most effective means of ensuring their inclusion is the use of a language or languages which will facilitate and maximise such participation.
    Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development 11/2014; 35(7).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Sociocultural and socio-economic conditions (e.g. subsistence family farming needs) as well as the absence of nearby public schools result in Ghanaian youth, primarily from rural areas, not receiving formal schooling. Because of this, children may never learn to read and write. One solution is a complementary education programme (CEP) that provides basic literacy skills at the end of each workday. School for Life, a Ghanaian CEP, promises basic literacy, increases the confidence of children to enrol in school as late starters and potentially impacts the cultural and linguistic identity of Ghanaians by developing literacy in local languages as well as contributing to the maintenance of linguistic diversity. The purpose of this study is to identify the value of a CEP for key stakeholders including School for Life learners, para-educators, leaders, CEP administrators and collaborators and to demonstrate how shared local values reflect and constitute the programme's identity in two villages.
    Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development 11/2014;
  • Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development 11/2014; 35(7).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In this paper, we address findings from a study conducted in a rural, Ugandan secondary school from August 2009 to May 2011 that explored the challenges and possibilities of developing language and literacy across the curriculum, including digital possibilities for the development of multilingual academic literacy. The central questions we address are: (1) in a rural African context, what educational conditions and language policies impact the use of English as a medium of instruction in secondary schools? and (2) how do teachers across the curriculum navigate these conditions and policies to integrate English language and content? Data collection methods included questionnaires, interviews, observations, policy document analysis and researchers' journal reflections. Central findings highlight the difficulties faced by content teachers in addressing their students' language needs in the context of contemporary policy guidelines; issues related to the pre-service preparation of subject area teachers; and possibilities for developing pedagogy for teaching language/s and literacies across the curriculum. From the findings, we argue that language policies, despite best intentions, might, like other ‘placed resources’ become dysfunctional when moved across distinctly different spaces from relatively well-resourced urban areas to poorly resourced rural communities and from elite to grassroots contexts.
    Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development 11/2014; 35(7).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Contemporary movements of people and resources across rural and urban settings, city locales and national and regional borders produce challenges for familiar ways of studying languages as located and stable systems and of literacies as standardised ways of reading and writing texts. This study contrasts children's digital communicative literacy practices in two homes in Cape Town, South Africa, showing major differences between how suburban middle-class children, on one hand, and urban township children encounter and engage with digital resources at home. Drawing on an understanding of new media as placed resources which operate in specific ways in particular contexts, this study shows these children as material, social and cognitive ‘sites’ where linguistic and sociopolitical norms are engaged with, absorbed and enacted. Rather than democratising resources, this research shows digital media as at least partially complicit in a ‘widening of the gap’ to the extent that the differential uses and availability of resources across social classes produce different imaginings of self, social ambitions and investments, and differing ways with social semiotics. Such differences translate into and contribute to the maintenance of social inequalities in school settings that coincide with language and social class divides.
    Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development 11/2014; 35(7).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This article presents the findings of a corpus-based study of the use of English vis-à-vis Cantonese and Putonghua in Hong Kong's Legislative Council in the past four decades. The objective of the study was to track the changing fortunes of the three languages in a key government institution during a period of unprecedented political, economic and social change. This was accomplished by analysing a 91-million-word corpus of Council proceedings derived from Hong Kong Hansard, which is the verbatim record of Council meetings. For the greater part of the colonial era (1842–1997), English was the sole medium of communication in the chamber. It was only in 1972 that Cantonese-speaking members were permitted to use the city's majority language in Council debates. In that year every speech was in English. Forty years later, only 0.38% of the addresses were in the colonial language, the overwhelming majority being in Cantonese (99.45%), with only a handful in Putonghua. This article describes and discusses the rise of Cantonese and the concomitant demise of English since the early 1970s, with a particular focus on the transitional 1990s, and speculates on the roles of Cantonese and Putonghua in the legislature in the years ahead.
    Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development 07/2014; 35(5).
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    ABSTRACT: More than 25% of the master's degrees in Denmark are taught using English as a medium of instruction (EMI), but not all university lecturers feel they have the appropriate academic English proficiency to meet the standard required. Based on interviews conducted at the Copenhagen Business School (CBS), this article sheds light on the challenges faced by a selection of these lecturers. The interviews formed part of the project Students' Perceptions of the English of Academics, which examines the use of EMI at CBS. Audio recordings were made of 33 lecturers. Questionnaires were distributed to almost 1800 students on a range of issues, including the lecturer's English proficiency. The lecturers themselves also completed a questionnaire. Subsequently, 17 of them were interviewed, five of whom belonged to the group with the weakest skills. Inspired by a categorisation used by Marschan-Piekkari, Welch, and Welch for their recommendations for managing English as a corporate language, the literature review in the present paper discusses university language management under the headings of staff selection, training and development, international assignments and performance appraisal. The insights gained from the interviews address issues such as attitudes to EMI policy, experience with EMI teaching, student evaluations and support.
    Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development 07/2014; 35(5).
  • Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development 07/2014; 35(5).
  • Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development 07/2014; 35(5).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Serving as a language translator (broker) for family members during childhood can affect cognitive and emotional functions in both beneficial and detrimental ways. Child language brokers translate in a variety of contexts including conversations between their parents and financial, legal and medical professionals. Pressure to be involved in these activities may negatively affect mental health by placing undue stress on child language brokers, while also distracting them from other responsibilities such as school. In this study, the relationship between language brokering during childhood and adolescence and the mental health of bilingual young adults was examined. Overall, language brokers had higher levels of depression. Young adults who previously served as language brokers, particularly during their preadolescent years, had higher levels of anxiety than their bilingual non-brokering counterparts. It is important for parents, educators and mental health professionals to become more aware of the mental health consequences that may arise from language brokering duties, particularly how symptoms vary depending on whether brokering began in childhood or adolescence.
    Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development 07/2014; 35(5).
  • Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development 07/2014; 35(5).
  • Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development 07/2014; 35(5).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This paper examines a family language policy (FLP) in the context of an extended bilingual Gaelic-English family on the Isle of Skye, Scotland. It demonstrates how certain family members (namely, the children's mother and paternal grandmother) negotiate and reify a strongly Gaelic-centred FLP. It then discusses how other extended family members (the children's father, his sister and brother) occasionally participate in this Gaelic-centred FLP; however, at the same time, these speakers also participate in language shift by maintaining English as their peer group language and replying in English when addressed in Gaelic. The paper argues that these linguistic practices socialise the children into the norms of language shift, resulting in the children's low use of Gaelic. The paper also discusses the possible negative impact of the father's use of Gaelic in disciplining his children.
    Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development 07/2014; 35(5).

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