Journal of Musicological Research

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

Description

The Journal of Musicological Research publishes original articles on all aspects of the discipline of music: historical musicology, style and repertory studies, music theory, ethnomusicology, music education, organology, and interdisciplinary studies. Because contemporary music scholarship addresses critical and analytical issues from a multiplicity of viewpoints, the Journal of Musicological Research seeks to present studies from all perspectives, using the full spectrum of methodologies. This variety makes the Journal a place where scholarly approaches can coexist, in all their harmony and occasional discord, and one that is not allied with any particular school or viewpoint. In addition to original research articles, the Journal of Musicological Research also publishes book reviews.

  • Impact factor
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  • 5-year impact
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  • Cited half-life
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  • Immediacy index
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  • Eigenfactor
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  • Article influence
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  • Website
    Journal of Musicological Research website
  • Other titles
    The Journal of musicological research
  • ISSN
    0141-1896
  • OCLC
    6273983
  • Material type
    Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Journal / Magazine / Newspaper, Internet Resource

Publisher details

Taylor & Francis

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author cannot archive a post-print version
  • Restrictions
    • 12 month embargo for STM, Behavioural Science and Public Health Journals
    • 18 month embargo for SSH journals
  • Conditions
    • Some individual journals may have policies prohibiting pre-print archiving
    • Pre-print on authors own website, Institutional or Subject Repository
    • Post-print on authors own website, Institutional or Subject Repository
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • On a non-profit server
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set statements to accompany deposits (see policy)
    • Publisher will deposit to PMC on behalf of NIH authors.
    • STM: Science, Technology and Medicine
    • SSH: Social Science and Humanities
    • 'Taylor & Francis (Psychology Press)' is an imprint of 'Taylor & Francis'
  • Classification
    ​ yellow

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The fascist totalitarian regime that ruled Italy from 1922 to 1943 took a direct interest in the production and promotion of music as an important part of a broader system for expressing cultural power and manipulating critical and social thought. The various branches of entertainment, including opera houses, were required to make rigorous use of propaganda, and to follow strict regulations issued in 1942 that excluded Jews from every sphere of the performing arts. Documents from the archives of the Teatro la Fenice contribute to our understanding of how such cultural institutions helped further the regime’s antisemitic ends, while shedding light on its treatment of composer Luigi Dallapiccola.
    Journal of Musicological Research 10/2014; 33(4).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: During World War I pipe bands were used by the British Armed Services as a component of recruitment and fundraising activities in the United States. Featured events were the July 1917 “British Recruiting Week,” the Allied Bazaar, and “Wake Up America,” in which the Canadian Highlanders and New Brunswick Kilties, as well as American pipe bands, took part. Activities and events that were held in the greater New York City area between 1916 and 1918 led to pipe bands being credited with increasing recruitment and interest in both the British and American war efforts.
    Journal of Musicological Research 03/2014; Volume 33(Issue 1-3):241-267.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Although the outbreak of the First World War caused economic hardship for Britain’s professional musicians, they were still often asked to perform for free in the service of charity. The public debate about the morality of asking financially vulnerable musicians to perform without the expectation of payment led to some attempts to address these difficulties, with new programs founded expressly to help musicians in wartime Britain. Two principal organizations—the Music in War-Time Committee and the War Emergency Entertainments—proved successful in providing work for struggling musicians, either in public concerts or private performances for hospitalized soldiers, and in the process produced benefits far more complex, valuable, and far-reaching—in terms of both those employed to give the concerts and the effect on those who received them—than merely the monetary value of the sums involved.
    Journal of Musicological Research 01/2014; 33.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Considered in the context of contemporary, upper-class mourning practices on the British home front, Lady Alda Hoare’s annotated sheet music collection symbolized a shrine to her son, who was killed in the First World War. Such use of material objects as sources of consolation became substitutes for the normal ritual of a burial, since soldiers’ bodies were not sent home. Departing from the existing literature’s focus on the public and professional musical responses to the War, Lady Alda’s music reveals an alternative, intensely private way in which music, as a symbol of memory, aided in the grieving process.
    Journal of Musicological Research 01/2014; 33.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: At the start of the First World War, numerous German and Austrian publishers issued editions of patriotic songs intended for use in the home. Such anthologies contained a variety of works, including traditional songs, military tunes, and even newly composed pieces for the conflict. Despite the dozens of collections that were published, this repertoire has received little scholarly attention. The four volumes dedicated expressly to songs concerning the War that appeared in the series Musik für Alle demonstrate why these selections were viewed as appropriate for those defending the home front.
    Journal of Musicological Research 01/2014; 33.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: During the First World War musical instruments were not only present on the Western Front; they were also manufactured by soldiers. They enabled soldiers to play music during their stay in the trenches and were critical components of the soldiers’ daily lives. Musical instruments, both professional and self-made, were highly valued by their possessors and sometimes even seen as a comrade, a fellow sufferer in the pernicious environment of the Western Front.
    Journal of Musicological Research 01/2014; 33.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: When the United States entered World War I in 1917, American military organizers hired song leaders to train new soldiers in singing, which—it was believed—would make the recruits fit for the fight by improving both their physical strength and military discipline. Song leaders took their responsibility seriously, and reported on their experiences in their official newsletter, Music in the Camps, which ran weekly from November 1917 to May 1919. The newsletter allows us to study the perspective of approximately seventy song leaders in charge of millions of men in camps across the nation, and to note their experiences with race, cultural differences, and the varying support of their military commanders. Song leaders were a product of a unique moment, when rhetoric about the power of singing to produce fighting men called on them to help form the mind and body of the American soldier.
    Journal of Musicological Research 01/2014; 33.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: While scholars have tended to position overtly patriotic works firmly on the lower registers of American cultural hierarchies, the debates surrounding German conductor Karl Muck’s reluctance to conduct “The Star-Spangled Banner” with the Boston Symphony Orchestra during World War I serve as a lens into the complex, shifting cultural position that patriotic music actually occupies. Competing opinions on whether Muck should conduct “The Star-Spangled Banner” placed patriotism alternately below, above, and on the same hierarchical plane as art. Moreover, these debates activated a preexisting discourse on the song’s difficulty level, allowing “The Star-Spangled Banner” to operate simultaneously as a popular work to be sung by all Americans and a sophisticated composition to be studied by skilled performers.
    Journal of Musicological Research 01/2014; 33.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: While a number of studies about music during the Great War have recently appeared, little has been written about composers and orchestras functioning within the armed forces. Fernand Halphen was a little-known French composer who served his country by directing—and writing music for—a territorial regimental band. Halphen’s personal papers, which include a rare booklet recording the repertory and performances of his band, offer a rarely viewed glimpse of musical activities near the Western Front.
    Journal of Musicological Research 01/2014; 33.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Despite the intense economic and psychological hardships faced by British civilians during the First World War, attendance at artistic performances in London throughout the course of the conflict remained steady. Furthermore, although many spheres of artistic engagement banned any works originating from a German source, classical music concert promoters maintained the hegemony of the canonic German repertoire rather than shifting toward an entirely British—and therefore overtly patriotic—repertory. Contemporary debate about the ethics of listening to German music varied during the War, providing the basis for a discussion of ideas of nostalgia, patriotism, communal memorialization, and political embodiment.
    Journal of Musicological Research 01/2014; 33.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Gustav Nottebohm's Nachlass at the Gesellschaft der Musikfreunde in Vienna contains three boxes of papers documenting his intensive study of Beethoven's manuscript materials. These boxes hold transcriptions of Beethoven's sketches, copies of his published articles with his added notes and corrections, diverse correspondence, commentary and analysis on specific musical passages and compositional techniques, and general working materials for his publications. A study of its contents sheds light on Nottebohm's research and the details of the Nachlass as it pertains to Beethoven studies, it illustrates Nottebohm's deep understanding of Beethoven's compositional process, and it provides an explanation of how Nottebohm's insightful identification of these compositional techniques can be used to identify similar instances in works by later composers, most notably Nottebohm's friend Johannes Brahms.
    Journal of Musicological Research 04/2013;
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    ABSTRACT: Israeli art music penned from the late 1930s to the early 1960s unfolds early serial practices in Mandatory (British) Palestine that had come to the fore during the early post-statehood years, when growing disillusionment with romanticist nationalism loomed large. Abandoning peripheral native masks, composers responded to the post-statehood shift by either adapting the linear properties of non-Western Jewish music, which they aligned with local readings of serial devices, or through the destabilization of folk-like dances and exotic musical markers. Shifts in Israeli poetry parallel the emerging attitudes of the first cohort of native Israeli composers and the gradual fading of the nation’s unisonality from their music.
    Journal of Musicological Research 01/2013; 32(4).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The original finale of Beethoven's violin sonata Op. 30, no. 1, wound up as the finale to his Op. 47, written in May 1803 for performance with George Bridgetower. Examining the Presto in its original context reveals numerous connections with the first two movements of Op. 30, no. 1. Taking the finale off the shelf one year later, Beethoven had to make two new movements that would seem to “grow toward” music already composed. These movements bear the imprint of their ready-made finale. To unpack the resultant “layering of reversals” entails remembering that what is staged in the finale as a recollection of “issues” in the preceding movements of Op. 47 is actually, given the order of composition, their “cause.” Much was at stake in Beethoven's endeavor, for his current symphonic project was the Eroica, for which the finale was essentially in place, in the guise of the Variations for Piano, Op. 35.
    Journal of Musicological Research 01/2013; 32.
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    ABSTRACT: Numerous writers on music in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries elaborated on the belief that each major or minor key was appropriate for the expression of a distinct affect or character, a sentiment with which Beethoven appears to have concurred. Just how this belief impressed itself on compositional practices is a more difficult question, as the choice of key in this era entailed several intertwining factors, both instrumental/acoustic and symbolic/traditional in nature. The key of E♭ major, one often mentioned in connection with Beethoven's “heroic” style, offers an illuminative example of this complex interplay of instrumental and symbolic associations.
    Journal of Musicological Research 01/2013; 32.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Even though Beethoven considered his Missa solemnis to be his greatest work, analysts, historians, and philosophers of music have found it difficult to reconcile the composer's use of historical styles and genres—including stile ecclesiastico, plainchant, and falsobordone, in addition to fugue—with the work's position as a late work. In the Credo in particular, Beethoven composes according to the text, using different music and textures for passages describing the tenets of Christian faith than he does for the narrative parts of the text. Studying the materials and the working out of the fugue set to the words “Et vitam venturi saeculi, Amen” shows that this Credo contrasts different levels of compositionally formed time as an expression of timelessness and eternity—essentials of Christian faith.
    Journal of Musicological Research 01/2013; 32.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Concern with the “Bruckner problem” was one of the most important elements in the scholarly and popular reception of Bruckner's symphonies in the second half of the twentieth century. The conventional position was to accept only the “original versions” as published by modern editors, while dismissing as corrupt the versions published during the composer's lifetime. This view of the Bruckner versions was forged by German-speaking scholars in the 1930s, and cultivated by English-speaking scholars and critics in the postwar era. Until now, the pivotal process by which this view came to be embraced has been largely overlooked, but is worthy of examination to show how it has shaped the appreciation of Bruckner's symphonies in the English-speaking world.
    Journal of Musicological Research 01/2013; 32(1).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The central movement of Beethoven's A-minor quartet Op. 132, the famous Heiliger Dankgesang, creates an experience of temporal meaning independent of narrative context and provides the basis for a deep, nonlinear connection between its internal language and apparently distant events. One such event is the surprising A-major ending of the Finale, which seems to come out of nowhere and yet also to function as an internally justified liberation from the narrative. The A-minor opening of the quartet's finale acts as a conveyer of narrative time, while the Heiliger Dankgesang creates a world that is isolated from this tonal narrative, disrupting and enriching the experience of time and preparing the way for the finale surprise. Beethoven's sketches support this reading of temporal events by revealing specific nonlinear connections between the third movement and the finale's playful liberation.
    Journal of Musicological Research 01/2013; 32.
  • Journal of Musicological Research 01/2013; 32(1).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: While scholars of musicology have viewed E.T.A. Hoffmann primarily as a brilliant critic of some of Beethoven's major works and as an important literary figure, Hoffmann regarded himself chiefly as a musician. Yet there is a considerable gap between Hoffmann the brilliant Beethoven critic and Hoffmann the suspiciously unoriginal instrumental composer. The unmistakable parallels between Beethoven's Op. 69 cello sonata and Hoffmann's Grand Trio, composed shortly after the publication of the cello sonata, are not likely to be purely accidental. The strong structural parallels between the two works, not to mention Hoffmann's astonishing compositional swiftness, leave little room for doubt that he had imitated his great predecessor.
    Journal of Musicological Research 01/2013; 32.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Beethoven's revision in 1800 of his String Quartet, Op. 18, no. 2, Finale, offers us a window into his rethinking of the boundaries of musical distance for this movement during a critical period of his development. Beethoven focused his changes on the Pianissimo passages, and aligned this dynamic with the movement's most extreme harmonic progressions and surprising aspects of its musical form. He also introduced various revisions to assure that the more radical, distant material in the Pianissimo sections remained, not just anchored to the rest of the movement, but central to its drama.
    Journal of Musicological Research 01/2013; 32.

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