New Zealand Journal of Crop and Horticultural Science (NEW ZEAL J CROP HORT )

Description

New Zealand Journal of Crop and Horticultural Science is an international research journal published for researchers in research institutes, universities, and other organisations worldwide concerned with all aspects of crop and horticultural science. New Zealand Journal of Crop and Horticultural Science publishes original research papers, review articles, and commentaries on all aspects of the production, protection, handling, and processing of crop and horticultural products. The scope of the journal encompasses agricultural economics, agronomy, biotechnology, entomology, plant nutrition, plant breeding, plant pathology, pomology, postharvest physiology, soil science, and viticulture. Papers on any horticultural crops are appropriate but the journal particularly encourages contributions on kiwifruit, apples, wine grapes and oenology, as well as papers on biosecurity, new crop and horticultural products and descriptions of new cultivar releases. Short communications, Book reviews, and Letters to the Editor are also published.

  • Impact factor
    0.48
    Show impact factor history
     
    Impact factor
  • 5-year impact
    0.57
  • Cited half-life
    0.00
  • Immediacy index
    0.00
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
    0.18
  • Website
    New Zealand Journal of Crop and Horticultural Science website
  • Other titles
    New Zealand journal of crop and horticultural science
  • ISSN
    0114-0671
  • OCLC
    20346537
  • Material type
    Government publication, National government publication, Periodical
  • Document type
    Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Post-storage deterioration of onion under ambient conditions (temperature 20–25 °C and relative humidity 60%–80%), subsequent to a cold storage period of 8 months, was investigated with an emphasis on changes in chemical composition of flavonols, sugars and phenylalanine. A simultaneous determination of total phenolics, total flavonoids and antioxidant activity was also done. At the 4th week of post-storage, the total quercetin content was three times (2.725 ± 0.097 μmol/g fresh weight [FW]) its initial post-storage value (0.877 ± 0.085 μmol/g FW) and visible signs of sprouting and decay appeared. The highest content of total quercetin in the onion bulb (3.209 ± 0.350 μmol/g FW) was found at the 8th week, and by the 10th week, the onion bulbs were severely decayed and were reduced to roughly half of the initial size. The fructose and glucose content decreased continuously during post-storage from 0.174 ± 0.007 to 0.024 ± 0.004 mmol/g FW and 0.368 ± 0.04 to 0.014 ± 0.006 mmol/g FW, respectively, whereas the sucrose content was almost constant. Total phenolics, total flavonoids and antioxidant activity increased and correlated well with total quercetin content during the post-storage period. Keywords: Allium cepa; bulb decay; phenylalanine; quercetin; sugars
    New Zealand Journal of Crop and Horticultural Science 01/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Clonal selection is an important tool for grapevine genetic improvement and high-quality production. Clonal selection has been carried out for 70 yr in Turkey and is being continued with different grape cultivars and rootstocks. In this study, 16 clones belonging to nine grape cultivars were selected by the Atatürk Central Horticultural Research Institute for study over 3 yr. Vines were characterised using standard ampelographic descriptors and the data obtained were transformed into numerical scores for analysis of genetic similarity. Although all the clones studied could be uniquely identified, there was much less variation between clones of a particular cultivar than there was between cultivars.
    New Zealand Journal of Crop and Horticultural Science 01/2014; 42(2).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The antioxidant activity of rose petals harvested at six different stages of flower development was determined for two different-coloured cultivars, ‘Carola’ and ‘Iceberg’. Antioxidant assayed included phenolic compounds, vitamins and 1, 1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl hydrate (DPPH). Significant variation in antioxidant properties and quantity was observed at six different maturity stages, but there was no significant difference in antioxidant activity between the two cultivars. Correlation analysis indicated that total phenols, total flavonoids, vitamin C and vitamin E might be the main contributors to the antioxidant activity of rose petal extracts. DPPH radical-scavenging activity peaked in the early bloom stage, and flowers in this stage possessed the highest functional benefits of all maturity stages.
    New Zealand Journal of Crop and Horticultural Science 01/2014; 42(1).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: A study over two growing seasons evaluated the efficacy and cost effectiveness of azoxystrobin (Amistar® SC), applied at different action thresholds and plant growth stages, on the incidence and severity of common rust of maize grown in the Pukekohe, New Zealand. Azoxystrobin applied as a preventative before disease symptoms appeared, or at the onset of disease symptoms, gave equal or better control than fungicide applications applied at 3% and 6% rust thresholds. However, using a 3% disease threshold up to the tasselling stage to time the application of azoxystrobin, controlled common rust in the more severe rust season (2008–09) and saved fungicide application costs associated with preventative (calendar) or disease-onset applications of azoxystrobin in the less severe rust season (2007–08) when the rust levels did not reach 3% by the tasselling stage. The maize hybrid 34D71 used was classified as moderately susceptible to common rust and, from the research presented here, it appears that although azoxystrobin applications reduced common rust severity, the lack of yield gains suggests that azoxystrobin applications in northern New Zealand may be economic only when growing highly susceptible maize varieties.
    New Zealand Journal of Crop and Horticultural Science 01/2014; 42(2).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Phytophagous mites and their predators were monitored from 1994 to 2000 on a range of cultivars of apple trees under biological fruit production (BFP) and integrated fruit production (IFP) methods, and compared with those on trees sprayed with an organophosphate insecticide programme (OPP). Two-spotted spider mite (TSM) was the dominant mite pest but it remained below economic thresholds under BFP and IFP, primarily through predation by Galendromus occidentalis, assisted by a range of other predatory mites and insects. The latter were largely absent under OPP, and OP-resistant G. occidentalis were unable alone to prevent TSM from causing unacceptable fruit infestation at harvest in some seasons. High populations of apple rust mite (ARM), Aculus schlechtendali, provided a valuable food source for G. occidentalis under BFP and IFP that was not available under OPP. Similarly, the use of acaricidal sulphur and lime sulphur as trial fungicides in the BFP orchard greatly reduced ARM density and disrupted phytoseiid control. European red mite (ERM), Panonychus ulmi, caused no economic damage in any production system, primarily because of predation by Typhlodromus pyri. The density of the anthocorid Orius vicinus, which feeds on ERM and TSM, was shown across all three production systems to be dependent on the density of ARM on the foliage, but no such relationship was found for the mirid Sejanus albisignata. This research has provided further evidence of the need to find alternative disease management strategies for organic production to substitute for the broad-spectrum fungicidal, acaricidal and insecticidal impacts of sulphur and lime sulphur.
    New Zealand Journal of Crop and Horticultural Science 01/2014; 42(2).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The two-spotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae Koch (Tetranychidae), is a pest of agricultural crops that could potentially be controlled by the predatory mite Neoseiulus pseudolongispinosus (Xin, Liang and Ke) (Phytoseiidae). This study investigated the development, fecundity and population density of these two mite species on three different species of bean (Phaseolus lunatus L., Lablab purpureus [L.] and Phaseolus vulgaris L. [Papilionaceae: Leguminosae]). The morphological characteristics of the host plants, including leaf area, thickness and hairiness, main stem diameter and plant height affected development rate, fecundity and population density of T. urticae and also the searching success and abundance of the predatory species, N. pseudolongispinosus. L. purpureus was found to be a superior host plant for both predator and prey species. These findings emphasize the importance of host plant characteristics on the performance of species used for biological control.
    New Zealand Journal of Crop and Horticultural Science 01/2014; 42(1).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Experiments were conducted over 5 years to understand the seasonal phenology of bare-rooted ‘Festival’ strawberry plants (Fragaria ×ananassa) growing at Nambour in southeastern Queensland, Australia. Yields ranged from 661 to 966 g/plant, and average seasonal fruit fresh weight ranged from 15 to 18 g. The growth of the leaves, crowns, roots, flowers and fruit over time followed a linear or sigmoid pattern. Maximum values of leaf, crown and root dry weight towards the end of the growing season about 190 days after planting were 30, 15 and 7 g/plant, respectively. The rates of leaf and crown growth were lower than those achieved in California under a Mediterranean climate. There were strong relationships between the allocation of dry matter to the leaves, crowns and roots and plant dry weight. Allocation to the leaves, and especially to the crowns and roots, declined as the plants grew. The number of fruit/plant increased initially over time with a decline later in the season. Average fruit fresh weight was generally higher early in the season and then declined as fruit production increased. There were strong relationships between the growth of the whole plant and the growth of the flowers and immature fruit, and leaf expansion, across the growing season and across the 5 different years. These results indicate that seasonal growth and potential productivity were strongly linked to the expansion of the leaves in this environment.
    New Zealand Journal of Crop and Horticultural Science 01/2014; 42(1).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The efficacy of the plant growth regulator uniconazole (Sumagic®) for manipulating pyrethrum canopy architecture and enhancing yield was evaluated in each of 3 years across northern Tasmania, Australia. Trials examined the efficacy of, and factors influencing, reliability and magnitude of responses, including product rate, application timing, the benefits of adding a non-ionic organosilicone surfactant (Activator®) and combining application with urea. Results suggested that a rate of 100 g L−1 uniconazole (2 L ha−1 Sumagic®) was the most efficacious and that the addition of Activator® was unnecessary. However, at the highest rate, the cost of using the product became prohibitive and therefore trials in the latter 2 years of the study were conducted using the lower rate. Timing of application was not critical for efficacy and yield enhancements were observed when uniconazole was applied when stem length ranged from 16 to 36 cm, coinciding with a 30-day period in spring. Physiological effects of uniconazole were significant reductions in the height of stems (approximately 6 cm at flowering), increases in green leaf area and the number of flowers produced per unit area; the effects were independent of field age. This information has formed the basis for a cost-benefit analysis for the adoption of uniconazole into pyrethrum production in Australia.
    New Zealand Journal of Crop and Horticultural Science 01/2014; 42(1).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The export of New Zealand tomatoes is restricted to Australia and Pacific Island nations and constrained by the cost and shortage of airfreight space. The industry does not have a consistent commercial solution to enable sea freight to the Asian market. A potent inhibitor of ethylene response, 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) has emerged as a tool for controlling ripening and extending the shelf life of many fresh products. Knowledge of 1-MCP effects on cool-stored fresh tomatoes is limited. In the present study, mature-green and breaker tomatoes treated with 1-MCP were stored at 2.5 °C for 5 weeks. At this temperature, 1-MCP treatment enhanced Alternaria decay severity (from latent infections) and resulted in softer fruit than non-treated controls, whereas 1-MCP reduced decay from ‘ripe rots’ when fruit were ripened at 20 °C. These results suggest that the ripening delay induced by 1-MCP may increase tomato chilling sensitivity during cool storage. While 1-MCP shows promising results in extending postharvest storage life in many crops, including tomatoes, these results indicated that application of 1-MCP before cool storage is not appropriate for assisting commercial sea freight of tomatoes. Nonetheless, it may be possible to apply 1-MCP and then store tomatoes above the temperatures that cause chilling injury in order to extend storage life.
    New Zealand Journal of Crop and Horticultural Science 01/2014; 42(2).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Temperature has a key influence on plant growth. Rising temperatures associated with the enhanced greenhouse effect are likely to have important impacts on the plants that humans grow for food. This review examines some of the implications of elevated temperature on pome fruit in Australia, where the pome fruit industry is a valuable contributor to economic and social stability in rural regions. Many pome fruit growing regions are likely to become too hot in the future for viable production from existing tree varieties and there are few cooler regions available to establish new orchards. Nonetheless, it is anticipated that economically sustainable production in existing locations could be maintained at least in the short term by deploying adaptive strategies such as on-farm practices that help cool and protect fruit crops. Under predicted climate change scenarios the need for adaptation is clear if the Australian pome fruit industry is to survive.
    New Zealand Journal of Crop and Horticultural Science 01/2014; 42(1).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Red light (10–12 lx) has been shown to induce the accumulation of steroidal glycoalkaloids (SGA) in potato (Solanum tuberosum) tubers. This study was to analyse the impact of genotypes, red light illumination and duration of incubation on SGA biosynthesis at the transcriptional level. The microtubers of wild species S. chacoense and cultivated potato varieties Shepody, Favorita, Longshu-3 and Zhuangshu-3 were tested. After 24 h incubation in the dark, the genes coding for hydroxymethylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (hmg1, hmg2) and squalene synthase (pss1) remained relatively stable in S. chacoense and Longshu-3. The gene coding for vetispiradiene synthase (pvs1) was significantly induced in Favorita and Longshu-3. The expressions of sgt1 (solanidine galactosyl transferase) and sgt3 (rhamnosyltransferase) were induced in all tested varieties except S. chacoense. The transcript abundance of hmg1, hmg2, sgt1 and sgt3 was increased with red light illumination and incubation duration, but pvs1 was decreased. The results imply a feedback regulation system at the transcriptional level in SGA biosynthesis during red light illumination.
    New Zealand Journal of Crop and Horticultural Science 01/2014; 42(2).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Post-storage deterioration of onion under ambient conditions (temperature 20–25 °C and relative humidity 60%–80%), subsequent to a cold storage period of 8 months, was investigated with an emphasis on changes in chemical composition of flavonols, sugars and phenylalanine. A simultaneous determination of total phenolics, total flavonoids and antioxidant activity was also done. At the 4th week of post-storage, the total quercetin content was three times (2.725 ± 0.097 μmol/g fresh weight [FW]) its initial post-storage value (0.877 ± 0.085 μmol/g FW) and visible signs of sprouting and decay appeared. The highest content of total quercetin in the onion bulb (3.209 ± 0.350 μmol/g FW) was found at the 8th week, and by the 10th week, the onion bulbs were severely decayed and were reduced to roughly half of the initial size. The fructose and glucose content decreased continuously during post-storage from 0.174 ± 0.007 to 0.024 ± 0.004 mmol/g FW and 0.368 ± 0.04 to 0.014 ± 0.006 mmol/g FW, respectively, whereas the sucrose content was almost constant. Total phenolics, total flavonoids and antioxidant activity increased and correlated well with total quercetin content during the post-storage period. Keywords: Allium cepa; bulb decay; phenylalanine; quercetin; sugars
    New Zealand Journal of Crop and Horticultural Science 10/2013;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Although citrus is an important source of ascorbic acid (AA), and even though girdling is an important agronomic practice in citrus production, the effect of girdling on ascorbate (ASC) accumulation has rarely been studied. In the present study, branch girdling (BG) was carried out on trees of Citrus unshiu cv. ‘Guoqing No. 1’ at 40 days before harvest to investigate its effect on fruit ASC accumulation and on the expression of genes involved in the AA l-galactose biosynthetic pathway. BG increased total ASC and AA contents in fruit peel and pulp. In parallel, soluble sugars in the fruit pulp increased. Moreover, the expression of all genes, except for l-galactose-1-P phosphatase (GPP), in the l-galactose pathway were induced in fruit pulp at least during the first 20 days of treatment while their expression (except for GPP) in fruit peel was reduced by BG treatment. Taken together, the expression profiles of six l-galactose biosynthetic genes did not coincide closely with the changes in fruit ASC content following BG. ASC content may respond to girdling via other biosynthetic, catabolic or recycling pathways.
    New Zealand Journal of Crop and Horticultural Science 01/2013; 41(1).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) increases the instantaneous rate of photosynthesis in C3 plants. With ample nutrients and water, this so-called ‘CO2 fertilization effect’ generally leads to improved growth and production of many plant species that humans use as food. To determine whether increasing CO2 could be beneficial to growth and yield of leafy Brassica vegetables, trials were established in a Free Air CO2 Enrichment facility at Horsham, Australia using projected atmospheric CO2 concentrations for the year 2050. The experiment measured the interacting effects of CO2 (ambient CO2 366 µmol/mol, elevated CO2 562 µmol/mol), nitrogen (low/high) and Brassica rapa cultivars (× 2) on shoot growth under south-eastern Australian conditions. For cultivars ‘Karate’ and ‘Chop Suey’, significant interaction between elevated CO2 and a high nitrogen treatment (196 kg/ha) increased the fresh weights of shoots.
    New Zealand Journal of Crop and Horticultural Science 01/2013; 41(2).

Related Journals