Bulletin of the Biological Society of Washington (Bull Biol Soc Wash )

Publisher: Biological Society of Washington

Description

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  • Other titles
    Bulletin of the Biological Society of Washington (Online), Bulletin of the Biological Society of Washington
  • ISSN
    0097-0298
  • OCLC
    80991912
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publications in this journal

  • Bulletin of the Biological Society of Washington 01/2009;
  • Bulletin of the Biological Society of Washington 01/2009; 17(1):8-18.
  • Bulletin of the Biological Society of Washington 01/2009; 17(1):20-23.
  • Bulletin of the Biological Society of Washington 01/2009; 17(1):52-59.
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    ABSTRACT: Plummers Island, a small site situated along the northern shore of the Potomac River in Montgomery County, Maryland, has been the research home of the Washington Biologists' Field Club for more than 100 years. Field work conducted by club members from 1901 to about 1925 resulted in the accumulation of thousands of insect specimens of all orders from the Island, most of which are deposited in the collections of the National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution. Little collecting was conducted from ca. 1930–1950. In the 1960s sampling by Karl Krombein focused on bees and wasps and that by Terry Erwin on carabid beetles. Since 1998 the Lepidoptera fauna, leaf beetles (Chrysomelidae), and darkling beetles (Tenebrionidae) all have been the subject of investigations. In 2005 and 2006 Malaise traps were deployed to sample other orders (e.g., Trichoptera, Diptera, Hyemenoptera). While the four major insect orders (i.e., Coleoptera, Diptera, Lepidoptera, and Hymenoptera) are represented by large numbers of historical specimens, only Lepidoptera have been surveyed thoroughly in recent times; notable exceptions include specific families: carabid beetles, leaf beetles, darkling beetles, sawflies, and bees and wasps. Based on an examination of the insect collection of the National Museum of Natural History and a review of relevant literature, we document 3012 insect species in 253 families, encompassing 18 insect orders: Collembola, Odonata, Dermaptera, Blattodea, Phasmatodea, Orthoptera, Psocoptera, Thysanoptera, Hemiptera, Neuroptera, Megaloptera, Coleoptera, Mecoptera, Trichoptera, Lepidoptera, Diptera, Siphonaptera, and Hymenoptera.
    Bulletin of the Biological Society of Washington 04/2008;
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    ABSTRACT: From 1902–2005, 75 species of Crambidae and 48 species of Pyralidae were collected on Plummers Island, Montgomery County, Maryland. An annotated list of the two families is provided, along with photographs of all recorded species. The Pyraloidea of Plummers Island have wide distributions in eastern United States with some species occurring as far west as Texas and a few others ranging from coast to coast. Hosts recorded in the literature are given, but they are unknown for 36% of the species. The majority of Pyraloidea feed on vascular plants, but hosts are diverse including algae, scale insects, and immatures of wasps, and bagworms.
    Bulletin of the Biological Society of Washington 04/2008;
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    ABSTRACT: From 1902–2005 six species of Nolidae, 88 species of Erebidae, and 118 species of Noctuidae have been recorded from Plummers Island, Montgomery County, Maryland. Extensive collecting conducted from 1998–2005 resulted in five species of Nolidae, 70 species of Erebidae, and 88 species of Noctuidae. Only the Nolidae had sufficient specimens collected from 1902–1930 to compare with collections taken from 1998–2005. Five species were present from 1902–1930, and five from 1998–2005 with no change in species richness. A 20% species turnover was noted, with one extinction and one colonization. Owing to probable under-sampling from 1902–1930, the Erebidae and Noctuidae show a 37% and a 32% increase, respectively. This is contrary to other studies at Plummers Island, which showed a decrease in species richness. Species accumulation curves were based only on material collected from 1998–2005. Both abundance and incidence-based estimators were used to predict six species of Nolidae, 79–102 species of Erebidae, and 101–135 species of Noctuidae. Of the total of 212 species for all three families, 75.9% of the species were represented by 10 or fewer specimens. A checklist of the Nolidae, Erebidae, and Noctuidae, and their monthly abundances from 1902–2005 is provided.
    Bulletin of the Biological Society of Washington 04/2008;
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    ABSTRACT: The National Insect Collection was searched for specimens of Mecoptera collected on or near Plummers Island, Montgomery County, Maryland, and the records were taken from those found. A special effort was made in 2004 and 2005 to collect insects on or adjacent to Plummers Island, using a number of techniques. In addition to the usual ultraviolet light traps, two Malaise traps were operated during the season in 2005. Eleven species of Mecoptera were identified from this material: nine taken in the 1900s and three in 2004–2005. They belong to four families and four genera. Most are species widely distributed over eastern North America, and none is considered endangered.
    Bulletin of the Biological Society of Washington 04/2008;
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    ABSTRACT: A total of 36 species of butterflies was documented from Plummers Island, Maryland, based on four sources: transect survey (2006), diurnal collecting (2005), Malaise trap sampling (2005–2006), and historical records (1904–1997). Each of the four sources contributed species not recorded in the other three, demonstrating the importance of combining methods when compiling inventories. Twenty-five species (69% of the total) were observed during a 10-week transect survey in 2006, with six species not recorded in other sources. Nineteen species (53%) were captured during diurnal collecting in 2005, with five species not recorded in other sources. Eight species (22%) were collected in Malaise traps, with one species not recorded in other sources. Ten species (28%) were represented by historical records in the collection of the National Museum of Natural History, Washington, D.C., with four species not recorded from other sources. The number of species (i.e., 36) is less than what would be expected based on previous inventories of the butterflies of the Washington, D.C. area, and this is most likely the result of the under-sampling.
    Bulletin of the Biological Society of Washington 04/2008;
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    ABSTRACT: We found 19 species of freshwater mollusks (seven bivalves, 12 gastropods) in the Plummers Island area, Maryland, bringing the total known for the Middle Potomac River to 42 species. We found seven species not previously known from the Middle Potomac River, but we failed to find 23 species that had been reported there previously. The new records probably reflect our searching in backwater and woodland pools, habitats that had been poorly searched previously. Species not found but represented by historical records (including 15 bivalves, of which 13 are Unionidae) may represent extirpations or species missed owing to low search effort for mussels. The introduced bivalve Corbicula fluminea, apparently absent from the Middle Potomac in 1978, was the third most numerous species collected in our survey. We found three bivalve species not previously reported in the Middle Potomac: Utterbackia imbecillis (Unionidae), and Pisidium compressum and Pisidium nitidum (both Sphaeriidae).
    Bulletin of the Biological Society of Washington 04/2008;
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    ABSTRACT: Copepod (Crustacea) species diversity was remarkably low on Plummers Island, Maryland, and its immediate environs over a year-long sampling period in 1996 and 1997, compared to that previously and contemporaneously reported nearby within the Potomac River Basin; only two species were found on the Island and two others in the adjacent side channel of the Potomac River. Subsequent sampling in 2004 resulted in records of eight species, seven of which were not found in 1997; six of these were collected on the Island. One explanation for the paucity of species in 1996–1997 is the extreme floods of January and September 1996; the January flood reached a height not recorded since 1972 and destroyed canal locks. These floods scoured much of the Potomac floodplain and may have caused severe local population losses. The scarcity of aquatic microhabitats on the Island undoubtedly also contributed to the low local diversity.
    Bulletin of the Biological Society of Washington 04/2008;
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    ABSTRACT: The nematode fauna of Plummers Island, on the Potomac River near Washington, D.C., is virtually unknown. Only three species have been reported from the Island: Daptonema dubium (Bütschli, 1873) Lorenzen, 1977, Isolaimium papillatum Cobb, 1920, and Tylolaimophorus cylindricum (Cobb, 1920) Goodey, 1963. We surveyed terrestrial and aquatic habitats on Plummers Island to begin to characterize its nematode fauna. Nematodes of 47 genera were found, representing 9 orders and 32 families, including an estimated 59 species. We provide diagnoses of the 3 species reported from the literature, a classified list of genera, their habitats and life stages found, and an estimate of the number of species found in each genus.
    Bulletin of the Biological Society of Washington 04/2008;
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    ABSTRACT: Eighteen species of Hydrophiloidea were collected on Plummers Island, Maryland between 1903 and 1972, representing 17.5% of the known fauna of Maryland. Of these, eight species are aquatic and ten are terrestrial. The most commonly collected species were Cymbiodyta chamberlaini Smetana and Enochrus cinctus (Say).
    Bulletin of the Biological Society of Washington 04/2008;
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    ABSTRACT: Based on historical records in the collection of the National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C., 63 species of Cerambycidae (Coleoptera) are reported from Plummers Island, Maryland. This number represents 24.9% of the Maryland cerambycid fauna. Specimens were collected from March to September, with July yielding the highest total (160 or 38.8%). Only 25 specimens were collected after 1927: three in 1931, three in 1932, one in 1933, one in 1941, 16 in 1968, and one in 2004. Four specimens of the state-listed endangered species Dryobius sexnotatus Linsley were collected prior to 1920.
    Bulletin of the Biological Society of Washington 04/2008;
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    ABSTRACT: The Chrysomelidae fauna of Plummers Island, Maryland consists of 161 species. This represents 43% of the known Maryland fauna. Work conducted in 1997 and 1998 showed a species turnover rate of 72.6% but a decline in species richness of only 2.1%. Nine species have been collected nowhere else in Maryland. Tricholochmaea decora decora (Say) is reported from Maryland for the first time.
    Bulletin of the Biological Society of Washington 04/2008;
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    ABSTRACT: During 2004–2006 insects were collected on or adjacent to Plummers Island, Montgomery County, Maryland by a number of techniques. Most neuropteroids were attracted to an ultraviolet light trap, but some were taken in Malaise traps operated during the season in 2005 and early 2006. Sixteen species of neuropteroids were identified from this material; they belong to 6 families and 14 genera. Although the samples included most of the megalopteran genera and species that are known from the region, the Neu-roptera were poorly represented. Five families almost assuredly present on the Island were not found. Most of the documented species are rather widely distributed over North America and none is considered endangered.
    Bulletin of the Biological Society of Washington 04/2008;
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    ABSTRACT: Based on historical records in the collection of National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C., 18 species of Dytiscidae have been collected on Plummers Island, Maryland. This represents 21.4% of the known Maryland dytiscid fauna. From 1903–1932 to 1960–1970, collection records show a turnover of 50% in the species composition of dytiscid beetles of the site. Agabetes acuductus (Harris), a species of special concern, has been collected twice on the Island.
    Bulletin of the Biological Society of Washington 04/2008;