Bulletin of the Biological Society of Washington (Bull Biol Soc Wash )

Publisher: Biological Society of Washington

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  • Other titles
    Bulletin of the Biological Society of Washington (Online), Bulletin of the Biological Society of Washington
  • ISSN
    0097-0298
  • OCLC
    80991912
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publications in this journal

  • Bulletin of the Biological Society of Washington 09/2009; 17(1):52-59.
  • Bulletin of the Biological Society of Washington 09/2009; 17(1):8-18.
  • Bulletin of the Biological Society of Washington 09/2009; 17(1):20-23.
  • Bulletin of the Biological Society of Washington 01/2009;
  • Bulletin of the Biological Society of Washington 05/2008; 15(1):31-40.
  • Bulletin of the Biological Society of Washington 05/2008; 15(1):41-43.
  • Bulletin of the Biological Society of Washington 05/2008; 15(1):49-51.
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    ABSTRACT: Species occurrences of darkling beetles (Coleoptera: Tenebrion-idae) are listed for the historically collected locality of Plummers Island, Maryland, on the Potomac River just upstream from Washington, D.C. The list is compared to that of the currently known Maryland species, which includes a number of new state records and range extensions. Notes on some of these occurrences and the absence of certain species are discussed. Mary-land records from multiple sources now total 128 species of this family of insects. Plummers Island records, from the beginning of the 20th century to the present, include nearly 50% of the state's fauna, and an additional 25% of the state's tenebrionids are expected there. The fifth largest family of beetles, with approxi-mately 19,000 described species worldwide, Tene-brionidae are a dominant part of many insect faunas, from deserts to rainforests. Current classification in-cludes the former families Alleculidae and Lagriidae and a number of recent status and nomenclatural changes (Bouchard et al. 2005). Nearly 200 genera and 1200 species occur in North America (Aalbu et al. 2002). With a great diversity of body form and size in adult and larval stages, ''darkling beetles'' have become specialized in many substrates, includ-ing soil, sand, rotten wood, woody fungi, and nests of other animals (ants, bees, termites, mammals, birds); a few are pests of stored grain and dry food products, and some eat lichens and live green plants. Caves and buildings may be inhabited by species which feed on bat guano and other organic material. Most species in forested areas feed either on fungi or rotten wood, but some tree-hole specialists and soil surface and nest scavengers also are represented. Species of desert and dry scrub habitats generally are scavengers living on or in sandy soils under leaf litter. The rock outcrops, dry slopes, sand deposits, and mixed mesic forest habitats on Plummers Island offer a good variety of these habitats. Of value as ecologic and biodiversity indicators, most Tenebrionidae are rather specific in habitat ''preference'' and sensitive to habitat change, espe-cially the flightless species (Steiner 1999). A working checklist of Maryland species is presented here, in order to compare the state's diversity with that of the historically collected locality of Plummers Island. The successional history of the Island, with a review of the species records in 25-year intervals since 1901, are examined in this study. Notes and discussions on the occurrence or absence of certain taxa are given. Maryland has a great variety of habitats with dis-tinct faunal elements, including ocean beach and dunes, sandy scrub, shale and serpentine barrens, rock outcrops, low southern hardwoods, and conif-erous forests. Most of the tenebrionid species record-ed from the state are widespread over much of east-ern North America, but some are known to have bo-real distributions and occur in the higher elevations of the western counties, while others are restricted to the southern coastal plain, some reaching the north-ern limits of their range in Maryland.
    Bulletin of the Biological Society of Washington 05/2008; 15(1).
  • Bulletin of the Biological Society of Washington 05/2008; 15:75-79.
  • Bulletin of the Biological Society of Washington 05/2008; 15(1):52-53.
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    ABSTRACT: Twenty-nine species of shore flies in 17 genera have been col-lected and identified from Plummers Island. Although relatively diverse, the shore-fly fauna known from the Island represents only 21% of the species known from the surrounding states, indicating that we probably are dealing with sampling error and that many more species are likely to be found there. Ephydrids or shore flies are well known among true flies (order Diptera) because of their rather unique ability to proliferate in environments that are normally inimical to life. Breeding habitats for some species include mineral and thermal springs, petro-leum pools, highly saline lakes, salt marshes, and small carrion (Foote 1995). Their unusual ability to breed in such a diverse array of habitats prompted Oldroyd (1964:189), a renowned English dipterist, to write: ''Evidently we are seeing in the Ephydridae a family of flies in the full flower of its evolution, and as such they offer attractive material for study, not only to the dipterist, but also to students of insect physiology and behavior.'' Obviously we concur and submit this faunal survey to document the diversity of shore flies on Plummers Island. Shore flies are diverse and often abundant in the Potomac River gorge, but being small flies, usually less than 3 mm, they are not often collected or iden-tified. The North American fauna includes 464 spe-cies (not including nomina dubia) and is now rea-sonably well known, although some genera, such as Allotrichoma Becker, have not been revised in the last 50 years, and we are aware of several undescri-bed or unreported species. According to the Mary-land Natural Heritage Program, there are no shore flies on the rare and endangered or threatened species in the state. This faunal survey is based on study of 174 spec-imens, representing 29 species in 17 genera. Twenty-nine species represents 21% of the fauna from the Delmarva states. Specimens have been collected from April to October. We highlight the collecting efforts of Raymond C. Shannon (1894–1945), who collected most of the 174 specimens. Ten species are represented by specimens that he alone collected. We provide a diagnosis for each species and note specific data for all specimens examined, such as the date of collection, collector, depository of the speci-mens and the number of specimens we examined by gender. Although many specimens examined for this study are in the National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C. (USNM), we also borrowed and studied numerous specimens, especially primary types, that are deposited in the following museums: AMNH—American Museum of Natural History, New York, New York; ANSP— Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia, Penn-sylvania; BMNH—The Natural History Museum, For each species, including junior synonyms that occur in the Nearctic Region, we list the status and depository of the primary type(s) and have used the abbreviations HT (holotype), LT (lectotype), and ST (syntype). In the synonymy provided for each species, we include papers where nomenclatural changes were made and selected others that provide information on the identification (especially if figures were included) and natural history of the species.
    Bulletin of the Biological Society of Washington 05/2008; 15(1).
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    ABSTRACT: During 2004 and 2005 insects were collected on or adjacent to Plummers Island, Montgomery County, Maryland using an ultraviolet light trap (2004 (2005) and two Malaise traps (2005). Forty-seven species of Trichoptera were identified from this material, representing 13 families and 25 genera. Most of the species are common and widely distributed over eastern North America, and none is considered of special concern or sensitive.
    Bulletin of the Biological Society of Washington 04/2008;
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    ABSTRACT: Based on the examination of approximately 8100 specimens of Lepidoptera in the collection of the National Museum of Natural History and a review of relevant literature, we document 836 species in 488 genera and 48 families from Plummers Island, Maryland. Although the Lepidoptera are probably the best studied insect order on Plummers Island, data from the Washington, D.C. area indicate that there likely are many more microlepidoptera and butterflies on the site that are yet to be documented. Most families that were sampled adequately both historically (1901–1920) and in recent years (1998–2005) show a reduction in species richness and considerable species turnover. However, interpretation of these data is difficult owing to differences in sampling techniques and sampling frequency over the last 100 years.
    Bulletin of the Biological Society of Washington 04/2008;
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    ABSTRACT: The published records of the fleas (Siphonaptera) known to occur on Plummers Island, Montgomery County, Maryland are reviewed. Peromyscopsylla scotti is reported for the first time, bringing the total number of species known from the Island to ten.
    Bulletin of the Biological Society of Washington 04/2008;
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    ABSTRACT: Based on historical specimens in the collection of the National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C., 25 species of Coccinellidae (Coleoptera) were collected on Plummers Island between 1902 and 1960. This represents approximately 32% of the recorded fauna of Maryland. Neoharmonia venusta venusta (Melsheimer) was the most commonly collected species.
    Bulletin of the Biological Society of Washington 04/2008;
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    ABSTRACT: Copepod (Crustacea) species diversity was remarkably low on Plummers Island, Maryland, and its immediate environs over a year-long sampling period in 1996 and 1997, compared to that previously and contemporaneously reported nearby within the Potomac River Basin; only two species were found on the Island and two others in the adjacent side channel of the Potomac River. Subsequent sampling in 2004 resulted in records of eight species, seven of which were not found in 1997; six of these were collected on the Island. One explanation for the paucity of species in 1996–1997 is the extreme floods of January and September 1996; the January flood reached a height not recorded since 1972 and destroyed canal locks. These floods scoured much of the Potomac floodplain and may have caused severe local population losses. The scarcity of aquatic microhabitats on the Island undoubtedly also contributed to the low local diversity.
    Bulletin of the Biological Society of Washington 04/2008;
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    ABSTRACT: The National Insect Collection was searched for specimens of Mecoptera collected on or near Plummers Island, Montgomery County, Maryland, and the records were taken from those found. A special effort was made in 2004 and 2005 to collect insects on or adjacent to Plummers Island, using a number of techniques. In addition to the usual ultraviolet light traps, two Malaise traps were operated during the season in 2005. Eleven species of Mecoptera were identified from this material: nine taken in the 1900s and three in 2004–2005. They belong to four families and four genera. Most are species widely distributed over eastern North America, and none is considered endangered.
    Bulletin of the Biological Society of Washington 04/2008;