The Physician and sportsmedicine

Journal description

The Physician and Sportsmedicine is a peer-reviewed monthly journal serving the practicing physician's professional and personal interests in the medical aspects of exercise, sports, and fitness. The most widely read clinical sports medicine journal in the world, we cover practical, primary care-oriented topics such as diagnosing and treating knee and ankle injuries, managing chronic disease, preventing and managing overuse injuries, helping patients lose weight safely, and all manner of exercise and nutrition topics.

Current impact factor: 1.49

Impact Factor Rankings

2015 Impact Factor Available summer 2015
2013/2014 Impact Factor 1.49
2012 Impact Factor 1.344
2011 Impact Factor 1.023
2008 Impact Factor 0.2
2007 Impact Factor 0.2
2006 Impact Factor 0.322
2005 Impact Factor 0.38
2004 Impact Factor 0.339
2003 Impact Factor 0.322
2002 Impact Factor 0.492
2001 Impact Factor 0.399
2000 Impact Factor 0.318
1999 Impact Factor 0.259
1998 Impact Factor 0.236
1997 Impact Factor 0.239

Impact factor over time

Impact factor
Year

Additional details

5-year impact 0.00
Cited half-life 0.00
Immediacy index 0.08
Eigenfactor 0.00
Article influence 0.00
Website Physician and Sportsmedicine Online, The website
Other titles Physician and sportsmedicine, Physician and sports medicine, Sportsmedicine, Sports medicine
ISSN 0091-3847
OCLC 1787159
Material type Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Journal / Magazine / Newspaper, Internet Resource

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Abstract Intraarticular corticosteroid injections are commonly used by the primary care providers and orthopedic surgeons to treat knee pain associated with osteoarthritis (OA). There is a spectrum of options for treating knee OA, ranging from ice therapy to partial or total knee replacement surgery. In mid-range treatment spectrum are different kinds of injections, with the most widely used being corticosteroid and hyaluronic acid. In addition, there are different types of corticosteroids used and also commonly mixed with different local anesthetics. The purpose of this paper is address current concepts on the use of corticosteroid steroid therapy for the treatment of knee OA.
    The Physician and sportsmedicine 02/2015;
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract We set out to highlight the significance of posterior symphyseal spurs as an unusual diagnostic possibility in athletes with chronic groin pain and to demonstrate that operative resection was successful in quickly and safely returning the patients to sporting activities. Five competitive nonprofessional male athletes, three soccer players, and two marathon runners (median age: 30 [26/33] years), who presented to us with significant groin and central pubic pain with duration of at least 12 months, and who had failed conservative or surgical interventions (symphyseal plating), were evaluated. Physical examination as well as pelvic radiographs confirmed the diagnosis of posterior symphyseal spurs. Four out of five athletes underwent complete resection of the spur. Size of spurs was 2.2 (1.3/2.9) cm (median) with four of them posterosuperiorly and one posterocentrally located. All of them had uneventful postoperative recovery period and were still pain-free at the latest follow up after 26.6 months (24/30). Median time-to-return to competitive sports level was 10 weeks (8/13). None of the patients developed pubic instability due to symphyseal spur resection. The results of considerable postoperative improvement in our patients highlight the significance of posterior symphyseal spurs as a diagnostic possibility in athletes with chronic groin pain.
    The Physician and sportsmedicine 02/2015;
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract Summary. ACL reconstruction with the RetroScrew™ shows superior clinical outcomes compared to historical Achilles allograft studies with antegrade screws. Addition of antegrade screw augmentation to retrograde fixation causes an increase in tibial tunnel widening. Introduction. In traditional antegrade screw fixation of Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) soft tissue allografts, the screw is secured in the opposite direction of graft tension, potentially altering the appropriate tension on the graft. The RetroScrew (Arthrex) is a bioabsorbable screw placed in a retrograde fashion, potentially improving the tension of the graft by placing the screw in a proximal-to-distal direction. In addition, the RetroScrew theoretically decreases tibial tunnel widening by closing the aperture of the tibial tunnel, which prevents ingress of synovial fluid. Early tunnel expansion has been implicated due to excessive transverse and longitudinal graft motion. The clinical effects of tunnel expansion have yet to be fully understood. The purpose of this study is to assess the clinical results and tunnel width after ACL soft tissue fixation in the tibia with the RetroScrew. Methods. Fifty-nine patients who underwent ACL reconstruction performed by two surgeons using the RetroScrew device returned for postoperative evaluation at an average of 25 months following surgery with a minimum follow-up of 12 months. Clinical evaluation, SF-36, IKDC and KT-1000 scores were recorded, and knee radiographs were used to measure tibial tunnel widening. Thirty-five patients had backup antegrade screw fixation in conjunction with the RetroScrew, and 24 patients had RetroScrew fixation alone. The results were compared to two previously reported studies on ACL reconstruction with Achilles tendon allograft that used antegrade screws. Results. The average IKDC score was 87 (range: 44-100), with mean KT-1000 side-to-side difference of 1.2 mm (range: 0-5 mm). Tibial tunnel widening was 4.93 mm (SD 3.32) on AP radiographs and 4.40 mm (SD 2.72) on lateral radiographs greater than the native tunnel drilling. Patients with additional backup fixation had significantly more tunnel widening than patients without backup fixation (P < 0.05). There was one failure based on KT-1000 measurements. When compared to previous studies using ACL allografts, RetroScrew patients had statistically superior Lachman exams, KT-1000 side-to-side differences and decreased tibial tunnel widening (P < 0.05) when antegrade fixation was excluded. Conclusion. Patients who underwent Achilles allograft ACL reconstruction with the RetroScrew had improved clinical results compared to historical controls using antegrade fixation. Tibial tunnel widening was increased when using additional antegrade screw fixation, suggesting that the amount of bioabsorbable material within the tibial tunnel was related to the degree of tunnel widening.
    The Physician and sportsmedicine 02/2015;
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is the leading cause of death during exercise. While initial reports suggested that the most common cause of SCD in young athletes was due to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), a critical review of investigations in several populations (athletes, non-athletes, military, national, and international) supports that the most common finding at autopsy of young individuals with SCD is actually a structurally normal heart (SNH). This information is vital for sports medicine clinicians, especially with regard to the pre-participation evaluation (PPE) since cardiac death associated with a SNH is likely attributed to disorders such as arrhythmia or ion channel diseases. This comprehensive review explores the causes of SCD, along with the symptoms preceding death, which ultimately may help refine the PPE and maximize the ability to detect potentially lethal disease prior to competition.
    The Physician and sportsmedicine 02/2015;
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract Exercise as an important part of life for the health and wellness of children and adults. Inducible laryngeal obstruction (ILO) is a consensus term used to describe a group of disorders previously called vocal cord dysfunction, paradoxical vocal fold motion, and numerous other terms. Exercise--ILO can impair one's ability to exercise, can be confused with asthma, leading to unnecessary prescription of asthma controller and rescue medication, and results in increased healthcare resource utilization including (rarely) emergency care. It is characterized by episodic shortness of breath and noisy breathing that generally occurs at high work rates. The present diagnostic gold standard for all types of ILO is laryngoscopic visualization of inappropriate glottic or supraglottic movement resulting in airway narrowing during a spontaneous event or provocation challenge. A number of different behavioral techniques, including speech therapy, biofeedback, and cognitive-behavioral psychotherapy, may be appropriate to treat individual patients. A consensus nomenclature, which will allow for better characterization of patients, coupled with new diagnostic techniques, may further define the epidemiology and etiology of ILO as well as enable objective evaluation of therapeutic modalities.
    The Physician and sportsmedicine 02/2015;
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract Engaging in regular physical activity is one of the major determinants of health. Studies have demonstrated the benefits of exercise in the treatment and prevention of most every common medical problem seen today. It is clear that patients who engage in an active and fit way of life, live longer, healthier, and better lives. For these reasons, every patient should be asked about exercise at every visit using an exercise vital sign (EVS) and, when needed, provided with an exercise prescription that encourages them to get 150 minutes or more moderate-to-vigorous physical activity. Physicians have an obligation to assess each patients exercise habits and inform them of the risks of being sedentary. Such an approach is critical to help stem the rising tide of deaths around the world due to noncommunicable diseases, which are so closely associated with a sedentary lifestyle.
    The Physician and sportsmedicine 02/2015; 43(1):22-26.
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract Introduction. The routine use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the assessment of acute knee injuries is controversial. The goal of this study is to present an audit of patients seen in a dedicated Acute Knee Injury Clinic (AKIC) to determine the frequency and appropriateness of MRI utilization. Methods. A retrospective review identified all patients who had an MRI and a randomly selected control group without MRI. The MRI was classified based on whether it was ordered by the AKIC team or by an external clinician. The consensus-based 'Indications for Urgent MRI in Acute Soft Tissue Knee Problems' were applied to both groups. An MRI was considered appropriate if any of the indications were met. Results. The overall MRI utilization rate was 23% (142/611). Of the MRIs performed, 32% (46/142) met the indications. About 94% (33/35) of the MRIs ordered by the AKIC experts met the indications, compared to only 12% (13/107) of those ordered externally. No patients in the control group met the indications. Diagnoses were similar between groups. Discussion. These results suggest that application of guidelines by experts in knee evaluation can significantly reduce expensive MRI utilization in patients with acute knee injuries without negatively impacting the appropriate diagnosis and disposition.
    The Physician and sportsmedicine 01/2015;
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract Shoulder pain and dysfunction is a complex problem frequently encountered by primary care physicians. Common nonarthritic conditions seen in the primary care setting include rotator cuff syndrome, impingement, posttraumatic stiffness, adhesive capsulitis, and instability. A thorough history and physical examination can aid in the diagnosis of many common shoulder complaints. Pain and instability are the most common shoulder complaints. Pain that is sharp or burning is commonly radicular in origin, whereas pain caused by tendinitis is often dull, diffuse, and aching. Instability is frequently found in patients with a history of dislocation, but also may occur with no prior history. Imaging modalities such as magnetic resonance imaging can be helpful for more advanced pathology. However, many common shoulder conditions can be diagnosed without imaging, and may be initially treated with a short course of rest, ice, topical analgesics, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, directed and supervised physical therapy, and occasionally subacromial corticosteroid injections. As always, a detailed history and a thorough physical exam by a primary care physician are vital for diagnosis. When conservative measures fail, referral to an orthopaedic surgeon may be necessary for further patient management.
    The Physician and sportsmedicine 01/2015;
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract Just as the type and duration of physical activity can have variable effects on the glucose levels and other cardiometabolic parameters among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), so can the types of foods have variable effects as well. This 12-week randomized study of 51 study participants evaluated the impact of routine consumption of dark raisins versus alternative processed snacks on glucose levels and other cardiovascular risk factors among patients with type T2DM. In this study, compared to alternative processed snacks, those who consumed raisins had a significant 23% reduction in postprandial glucose levels (P = 0.024). Also compared to snacks, those who consumed raisins had a 19% reduction in fasting glucose and 0.12% reduction in hemoglobin A1c, although these latter findings did not achieve statistical significance. Regarding blood pressure, compared to alternative processed snacks, those who consumed raisins had a significant 8.7 mmHg reduction in systolic blood pressure (P = 0.035) (7.5% [P = 0.031]) but did not experience a significant reduction in diastolic blood pressure. Compared to alternative processed snacks, those who consumed raisins did not have a significant improvement in body weight, body mass index, waist circumference, fasting insulin, homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL), triglyceride, or non-HDL cholesterol levels. Overall, these data support raisins as a healthy alternative compare to processed snacks in patients with T2DM.
    The Physician and sportsmedicine 01/2015;
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract Objective. To summarize the best available evidence to determine if tendon needling is an effective treatment for tendinopathy. Data source. Medline and Cochrane Databases through November 2013. Review methods. Utilizing the search terms tendinopathy, needle, needling, tenotomy, dry needling, needling tendon, needle fenestration, and tendon fenestration, 17 articles were identified through our systematic literature search. Of these, 4 studies met the inclusion criteria. Four independent reviewers reviewed the articles. The study results and generated conclusions were agreed upon. Results. The studies that were included in this review suggest that tendon needling improves patient reported outcomes in patients with tendinopathy. In 2 studies evaluating tendon needling in lateral epicondylosis, one showed an improvement in a subjective visual analogue scale score of 34% (significant change > 25%) from baseline at 6 months. The other showed an improvement of 56.1% in a visual analogue scale score from baseline. In 1 study evaluating tendon needling in addition to eccentric therapy for Achilles tendinosis, the subjective Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment-Achilles (VISA-A) score improved by 19.9 (significant change > 10) (95% CI, 13.6-26.2) from baseline. In 1 study evaluating tendon needling in rotator cuff tendinosis, the subjective shoulder pain and disability index showed statistical significant improvement from baseline at 6 months (P < 0.05). Conclusions. The evidence suggests that tendon needling improves patient-reported outcome measures in patients with tendinopathy. There is a trend that shows that the addition of autologous blood products may further improve theses outcomes.
    The Physician and sportsmedicine 01/2015;
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract Many common conditions in sports medicine are eponymous; that is, they are named for the person first describing or popularizing the diagnosis. But other medical conditions are named for the action or activity that is associated with the pathology. This article lists and references these conditions, and suggests that this group of conditions should be called "motionyms."
    The Physician and sportsmedicine 01/2015;
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract Background: Chronic tendinopathy has often been a management dilemma for general practitioners. With our understanding of the pathophysiology of tendinopathy evolving, so has our management, with the advent of newer strategies such as topical glycerol trinitrate, extracorporeal shock-wave therapy, as well as platelet-rich plasma (PRP). Aim: To systematically review the literature regarding PRP therapy in chronic tendinopathy. Design and setting: The databases used in our search include the Elton B. Stephens Co. (EBSCO) database, Medline, the Cochrane library, Ovid, and Embase (the Excerpta Medica database). A total of 389 articles were reviewed from Feb 2010 to April 2014, for possible inclusion. Of these articles, a total of 9 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) met our inclusion criteria. Only 1 RCT was excluded due to previous surgery in both the trial and control groups. Methods: Each article was reviewed independently by 2 authors. Each article was analyzed using the Cochrane Criteria checklist. Where any discrepancy occurred in results, a third independent reviewer was consulted. Results: Our review found that PRP was most effective in patellar and lateral epicondylar tendinopathy, with both RCTs in the patellar section of our study supporting the use of PRP in pain reduction at 3 and 12 months, whereas 2 of 4 studies in the lateral epicondylar section showed improvements in pain and disability at 6 and 12 months. There was a lack of evidence to support the use of PRP in Achilles and rotator cuff tendinopathy. Conclusions: Although the results of this review show promise for the use of PRP in chronic tendinopathy, the analysis highlighted the need for more controlled clinical trials comparing PRP with placebo.
    The Physician and sportsmedicine 01/2015;
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract The large amount of force imparted across the shoulder during the act of throwing makes the glenohumeral joint highly susceptible to injury in the athlete performing overhead throwing motions. The bony incongruity of the shoulder enables greater range of motion than any other joint in the body, but it also results in significant strain on the surrounding soft tissues during the throwing motion. Throwers can present with acute injuries, but more commonly they suffer from chronic overuse conditions resulting from repetitive overload. Proper management requires early recognition with treatment directed toward the athlete's safe return to sports. Failure to institute an appropriate management strategy may result in significant complications, including prolonged disability, progression of symptoms, and further injury. We discuss the functional anatomy, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, evaluation, and treatment of common injuries of the glenoid labrum and rotator cuff in the overhead throwing athlete.
    The Physician and sportsmedicine 01/2015;
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract Purpose. The purpose of this study was to test the effects of a cancer survivor exercise program and an online recovery awareness program (Restwise) on physical outcomes of aerobic capacity and muscle strength. Design. Randomized controlled trial design. Setting. Treasure Valley Family YMCA, Boise, ID. Sample: Fifty cancer survivors. Methods. Subjects were randomly assigned to the 12-week exercise program or the exercise program and Restwise. Restwise required users to complete daily objective and subjective ratings. Restwise compiles these data to provide individualized feedback recommending the exercise dose to maximize recovery and minimize fatigue. Main Research variable. Baseline and posttest measures of physical performance (6-minute walk, 1-repetition maximum of lower and upper body strength). Findings. The exercise plus Restwise group demonstrated significant improvements (P < 0.001) that were found on all 3 physical measurements of strength and endurance. The exercise-only group demonstrated significant within-group improvement only on the 6-minute walk. The exercise plus Restwise group demonstrated an 18.5% greater improvement in the 6-minute walk, and a 35.2% and 45%, respectively, greater improvement on the leg and chest press than the exercise-only group. However, the between-group differences were not significant. Conclusion. Cancer survivors who use the Restwise online recovery program in conjunction with an exercise program demonstrated minimal clinically important differences compared with other clinical populations on all 3 measures, whereas the exercise-only group had improvements only on the 6-minute walk. Patient adherence to the Restwise program was good, and patients provided positive feedback.
    The Physician and sportsmedicine 01/2015;
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract The shoulder is the most common joint to dislocate in the human body, with the dislocation often occurring in the anterior direction. This injury frequently results in soft tissue injury (eg, labral tear, capsular stretching) or bone injury (eg, glenoid or humeral head bone loss), which commonly leads to persistent deficits of shoulder function and a high risk of subsequent instability episodes in young, active patients. Patients with a significant degree of glenoid bone loss (> 25%) may require surgical intervention using the Latarjet procedure, which is an open bony augmentation of the glenoid. This procedure involves transferring the tip of the coracoid to the anteroinferior glenoid, creating a bony block and musculotendinous sling to prevent instability. Rehabilitation after the procedure is a slow progression over 4 to 6 months to regain range of motion and strength, while protecting the bony augmentation. Recent reports have shown success with the Latarjet procedure, as indicated by patient satisfaction scores and a low rate of recurrent instability.
    The Physician and sportsmedicine 01/2015;
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract Athletes are often advised to drink in order to "fully replace bodyweight losses" in order to prevent exertional heatstroke (EHS) during exercise in the heat. There is little evidence that "dehydration" in the range experienced by athletes adversely affects thermoregulation or is the exclusive cause of EHS. In contrast it is established that excess fluid intake can cause exercise-associated hyponatremia (EAH) sometimes associated with encephalopathy (EAHE). As part of a series of experiments to determine optimal fluid replacement during exercise in the heat, we studied a group of exceptionally well-conditioned and heat-adapted members of the South African National Defence Force. A 20 year old male started a time restricted 50 km route-march in a dry bulb temperature that reached 37.5°C (WBGT of 33.6°C, relative humidity of 85%). Pre-march plasma osmolality, serum [Na(+)] and total body water measures indicated euhydration. Fluid was available ad libitum and isotonic sports drinks at 5 km intervals. Fluid intake and core body temperature (Tc) were recorded throughout while he was tracked by a global positioning system measuring distance travelled, position and speed. Comparing the total fluid intake of the soldier (12930 L) to the rest of the participants (mean intake of 9 038 L) up to 40 km, it is evident that his intake was 3892 L (approximately 300 mL h(-1)) more than the mean for group. At approximately 17h14 the soldier was found lying by himself at the side of the route, 2.24 km from the finish point. He passed away the next day in a medical care facility. This tragic event provides the valuable opportunity to present data on the pacing, temperature regulation and fluid consumption of an exceptional athlete during the development of a fatal case of combined EAHE and EHS. Pacing, fluid intake, Tc and environmental condition data are presented for 5km intervals throughout the march. We propose a novel hypothesis on the possible contribution of EAHE to the development of EHS.
    The Physician and sportsmedicine 01/2015;
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract Anaphylaxis is an unanticipated, acute, and sometimes life-threatening systemic reaction with variable clinical presentations that is typically mediated by immunoglobulin E and causes degranulation of mast cells and basophils. The onset of symptoms can occur within minutes or hours after exposure to a known or suspected trigger, and reactions sometimes progress very rapidly, which can lead to death. One trigger of anaphylaxis in younger adults is moderately intense physical exercise, which has been termed exercise-induced anaphylaxis (EIA). Although rare, EIA should be recognized as a distinct and potentially life-threatening form of physical allergy, and is often undetected or inadequately treated. The ingestion of specific foods, including seafood, tree nuts, and wheat, or a nonspecific meal consisting of multiple food components shortly before or after physical exertion, is sometimes, but not always, the principal precipitant of EIA. This article briefly explores the current hypotheses on the role of immunoglobulin E, response mediators, and physiologic changes that bring on EIA, and discusses the current recommendations for diagnosis, including allergen challenge and laboratory testing, emergency care, and long-term prevention and patient follow-up. Accurate diagnosis of EIA is critical to providing lifesaving therapy and care plans to patients at risk. With respect to the medical management of EIA, mainstay therapy with epinephrine is described. For those with a known history of EIA, a comprehensive anaphylaxis action plan is central to successful patient management. Furthermore, patient education is necessary to heighten awareness of the signs and symptoms of EIA and appropriate strategies for allergen avoidance and self-management of anaphylactic episodes with self-injectable epinephrine.
    The Physician and sportsmedicine 01/2015;
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract Background. Treatment of type III acromioclavicular (AC) separations is controversial, especially in the dominant shoulder of a high-level throwing athlete. This case report describes the return to play after nonoperative management of a collegiate baseball pitcher with a severe type III AC separation in his throwing shoulder. Hypothesis/purpose. Case report of return to play with nonoperative management of a type III AC separation in the throwing shoulder of a collegiate pitcher. Study design. A case report of a single patient. Methods. Prospective data were recorded in the case of a collegiate pitcher who suffered an acute injury to the dominant shoulder, resulting in a severe type III AC separation. He was initially treated with a figure-of-8 brace and a sling. Postinjury, strengthening of the wrist, hand, and elbow began at 3½ weeks, and shoulder range of motion (ROM) and a periscapular strengthening program began at 6 weeks. At 2 months postinjury, a deformity was still present, but the athlete was pain free, with full shoulder ROM and strength without tenderness at the AC joint. Formal physical therapy was initiated to include an accelerated interval throwing program. Results. At 12 weeks postinjury, the athlete was pitching asymptomatically, and gradually returned to regular play. At 6 months and now through 24 months postinjury, the athlete reported full strength, full ROM, and return to his previous level of throwing and velocity without complication. He volunteered that he was 100% satisfied with the result, and feels he is the same pitcher as, if not stronger than, prior to this injury. Conclusions. This case demonstrates a collegiate baseball pitcher who returned to his preinjury level of pitching with nonoperative treatment of a severe type III AC separation.
    The Physician and sportsmedicine 01/2015;
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract Glenohumeral joint dislocation is common among younger, active patients. Anterior dislocation is the most common direction of instability following a traumatic event. Due to a high rate of recurrence following primary traumatic anterior shoulder dislocation, an evidence-based approach is necessary to determine the best treatment regime for a patient presenting with this problem. A history, physical examination, and radiographic imaging can help guide treatment recommendations by determining the extent of soft tissue damage following dislocation. Controversies in the treatment of the first-time dislocator include the length and position of immobilization following dislocation, and the role of initial surgical stabilization. This article outlines the treatment options for the first-time glenohumeral dislocator, with an emphasis on the available evidence in the literature. Where applicable, the criteria known as the Strength of Recommendation Taxonomy were used to summarize the strength of evidence available for recommendations.
    The Physician and sportsmedicine 01/2015;
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract Thyrotoxic hypokalemic periodic paralysis is characterized by acute attacks of muscle paralysis, hypokalemia, and thyrotoxicosis. It is a medical emergency, as fatal and life-threatening ventricular arrhythmia associated with hypokalemia has been reported. A 24-year-old man presented with severe lower extremity weakness, which progressed to his trunk and arms. He denied any associated symptoms and had no history of a similar episode or predisposing condition. The physical examination was significant for bilateral extremity weakness, more severe in the lower as compared to the upper extremities. The rest of the neurologic exam was normal. A small, smooth, nontender goiter was palpated. Laboratory data was significant for a potassium level of 2.0 mEq/L. Final lab data revealed a thyroid panel consistent with hyperthyroidism. Once the patient's potassium level normalized after repletion, he recovered his strength and was able to walk again. He was diagnosed with thyrotoxic hypokalemic periodic paralysis, a potentially lethal complication of hyperthyroidism. Because it is reversible with treatment of hyperthyroidism, it is imperative that this condition be considered, recognized and managed appropriately.
    The Physician and sportsmedicine 01/2015;