Alcohol health and research world (Alcohol Health Res World)

Publisher: National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (U.S.); United States. Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Mental Health Administration; National Institutes of Health (U.S.)

Journal description

Discontinued in 1998. Continued by Alcohol Research & Health (1535-7414).

Current impact factor: 0.00

Impact Factor Rankings

Additional details

5-year impact 0.00
Cited half-life 0.00
Immediacy index 0.00
Eigenfactor 0.00
Article influence 0.00
Website Alcohol Health & Research World website
Other titles Alcohol health and research world, Alcohol health & research world
ISSN 0090-838X
OCLC 1785965
Material type Government publication, National government publication, Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Journal / Magazine / Newspaper, Internet Resource

Publications in this journal

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    ABSTRACT: Research suggests that alcohol consumption during early adolescence may delay the onset of female puberty. Alcohol's effect on sexual development is associated with altered function of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1). This hormone, which is produced in the liver, travels through the bloodstream to the brain, where it helps coordinate overall physical growth with the maturation of the reproductive system. Long-term alcohol consumption inhibits the production of IGF-1 in the liver. Short-term alcohol administration alters IGF-1 function within the brain, ultimately suppressing the release of specific reproductive hormones that initiate puberty. Large proportions of young girls develop drinking habits that place them at risk for alcohol-related endocrine disorders at a crucial time in female pubertal development.
    Alcohol health and research world 02/1998; 22(3):165-9.
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    ABSTRACT: Appropriate treatment of alcohol withdrawal (AW) can relieve the patient's discomfort, prevent the development of more serious symptoms, and forestall cumulative effects that might worsen future withdrawals. Hospital admission provides the safest setting for the treatment of AW, although many patients with mild to moderate symptoms can be treated successfully on an outpatient basis. Severe AW requires pharmacological intervention. Although a wide variety of medications have been used for this purpose, clinicians disagree on the optimum medications and prescribing schedules. The treatment of specific withdrawal complications such as delirium tremens and seizures presents special problems and requires further research.
    Alcohol health and research world 02/1998; 22(1):38-43.
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    ABSTRACT: Long-term alcohol consumption can interfere with bone growth and replacement of bone tissue (i.e., remodeling), resulting in decreased bone density and increased risk of fracture. These effects may be exerted directly or indirectly through the many cell types, hormones, and growth factors that regulate bone metabolism. Alcohol consumption during adolescence reduces peak bone mass and can result in relatively weak adult bones that are more susceptible to fracture. In adults, alcohol consumption can disrupt the ongoing balance between the erosion and the remodeling of bone tissue, contributing to alcoholic bone disease. This imbalance results in part from alcohol-induced inhibition of osteoblasts, specialized cells that deposit new bone. Some evidence suggests that moderate drinking may decrease the risk of fracture in postmenopausal women.
    Alcohol health and research world 02/1998; 22(3):190-4.
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    ABSTRACT: The vast majority of Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) members in the United States are white, and only a few studies have investigated the program's effectiveness for ethnic minorities. Project MATCH, a multisite research study aimed at developing guidelines for assigning alcoholics to appropriate treatment approaches, also assessed AA effectiveness for minority clients. Some differences in AA attendance existed among white, African-American, and Hispanic Project MATCH participants who had received some inpatient treatment before entering the study, but not among participants who had not received inpatient treatment. Further analyses of white and Hispanic Project MATCH participants demonstrated that although Hispanic clients attended AA less frequently than white clients, their involvement with and commitment to AA was higher than among white clients. For both Hispanics and whites, AA involvement predicted increased abstinence.
    Alcohol health and research world 02/1998; 22(4):281-5.
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    ABSTRACT: The male reproductive system consists of the hypothalamus, the anterior pituitary gland, and the testes. Alcohol can interfere with the function of each of these components, thereby causing impotence, infertility, and reduced male secondary sexual characteristics. In the testes, alcohol can adversely affect the Leydig cells, which produce and secrete the hormone testosterone. Studies found that heavy alcohol consumption results in reduced testosterone levels in the blood. Alcohol also impairs the function of the testicular Sertoli cells that play an important role in sperm maturation. In the pituitary gland, alcohol can decrease the production, release, and/or activity of two hormones with critical reproductive functions, luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone. Finally, alcohol can interfere with hormone production in the hypothalamus.
    Alcohol health and research world 02/1998; 22(3):195-201.
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    ABSTRACT: A plethora of hormones regulate many of the body's functions, including growth and development, metabolism, electrolyte balances, and reproduction. Numerous glands throughout the body produce hormones. The hypothalamus produces several releasing and inhibiting hormones that act on the pituitary gland, stimulating the release of pituitary hormones. Of the pituitary hormones, several act on other glands located in various regions of the body, whereas other pituitary hormones directly affect their target organs. Other hormone-producing glands throughout the body include the adrenal glands, which primarily produce cortisol; the gonads (i.e., ovaries and testes), which produce sex hormones; the thyroid, which produces thyroid hormone; the parathyroid, which produces parathyroid hormone; and the pancreas, which produces insulin and glucagon. Many of these hormones are part of regulatory hormonal cascades involving a hypothalamic hormone, one or more pituitary hormones, and one or more target gland hormones.
    Alcohol health and research world 02/1998; 22(3):153-64.
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    ABSTRACT: Disease processes or events that accompany acute alcohol withdrawal (AW) can cause significant illness and death. Some patients experience seizures, which may increase in severity with subsequent AW episodes. Another potential AW complication is delirium tremens, characterized by hallucinations, mental confusion, and disorientation. Cognitive impairment and delirium may lead to a chronic memory disorder (i.e., Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome). Psychiatric problems associated with withdrawal include anxiety, depression, and sleep disturbance. In addition, alterations in physiology, mood, and behavior may persist after acute withdrawal has subsided, motivating relapse to heavy drinking. Recent advances in neurobiology may support the development of improved medications to decrease the risk of AW complications and support long-term sobriety.
    Alcohol health and research world 02/1998; 22(1):61-6.
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    ABSTRACT: Alcohol use by a pregnant woman may interfere with the development of her fetus. Newborns whose mothers are intoxicated during delivery can experience withdrawal symptoms, such as tremors and even seizures. It is likely that withdrawal also can occur during fetal development. Thus, the possibility exists that withdrawal by the pregnant woman may exacerbate alcohol's adverse effects on her fetus. One potential mechanism through which alcohol withdrawal might damage the fetus involves the receptor for the neurotransmitter glutamate (i.e., the N-methyl-D-aspartate [NMDA] receptor). This receptor plays a crucial role during neuronal development. Excessive activation of the NMDA receptor, which occurs during withdrawal, may lead to neuronal cell death. Animal studies suggest that these effects may contribute to behavioral deficits following prenatal exposure to alcohol.
    Alcohol health and research world 02/1998; 22(1):47-53.
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    ABSTRACT: Alcoholic beverages contain not only alcohol but also numerous other substances (i.e., congeners) that may contribute to the beverages' physiological effects. Plants used to produce alcoholic beverages contain estrogenlike substances (i.e., phytoestrogens). Observations that men with alcoholic cirrhosis often show testicular failure and symptoms of feminization have suggested that alcoholic beverages may contain biologically active phytoestrogens as congeners. Biochemical analyses have identified several phytoestrogens in the congeners of bourbon, beer, and wine. Studies using subjects who produced no estrogen themselves (i.e., rats whose ovaries had been removed and postmenopausal women) demonstrated that phytoestrogens in alcoholic beverage congeners exerted estrogenlike effects in both animals and humans. Those effects were observed even at moderate drinking levels.
    Alcohol health and research world 02/1998; 22(3):220-7.
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    ABSTRACT: All mammals produce milk to nourish their young. Milk production (i.e., lactation), which occurs in the mammary glands, is regulated by several hormones, most prominently prolactin and oxytocin. Studies in both humans and laboratory animals have demonstrated that maternal alcohol consumption before and during lactation can interfere with the functions of both of those hormones. Moreover, animal studies found that maternal alcohol consumption during pregnancy and even earlier in the mother's life can impair mammary gland development. Maternal alcohol consumption during pregnancy and lactation also can alter the milk's nutrient composition and result in suckling deficits of the offspring. Alcohol (and possibly its breakdown products) can pass from the maternal circulation into the breast milk. The effects of these substances on the infant, however, are still unknown.
    Alcohol health and research world 02/1998; 22(3):178-84.
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    Alcohol health and research world 02/1998; 22(1):44-6.
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    Alcohol health and research world 02/1998; 22(2):122-5.