Quarterly Journal of Speech (Q J SPEECH )

Publisher: Speech Communication Association; National Association of Teachers of Speech (U.S.); Speech Association of America, Taylor & Francis

Description

Quarterly Journal of Speech, published in February, May, August and November, includes articles, research reports, and book reviews of interest to persons across a broad spectrum of the communication arts. QJS tends to be humanistic in its orientation. QJS presents research that is original, significant, and designed to further understanding of the processes of human communication, particularly in its rhetorical and cultural dimensions. Essays in the journal generally consider the theory and criticism of situated discourse in its various forms and venues, including the oral and written, public and private, direct and mediated, historical and contemporary. Although research in the journal is generally humanistic, the journal's mission and focus are not limited to any particular methodology or set of methodologies. Issues, texts, and research questions significant to improved understanding of discourse practices are featured.

  • Impact factor
    0.36
  • 5-year impact
    0.52
  • Cited half-life
    0.00
  • Immediacy index
    0.00
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
    0.18
  • Website
    Quarterly Journal of Speech website
  • Other titles
    The Quarterly journal of speech
  • ISSN
    0033-5630
  • OCLC
    1763239
  • Material type
    Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Journal / Magazine / Newspaper, Internet Resource

Publisher details

Taylor & Francis

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author cannot archive a post-print version
  • Restrictions
    • 12 month embargo for STM, Behavioural Science and Public Health Journals
    • 18 month embargo for SSH journals
  • Conditions
    • Some individual journals may have policies prohibiting pre-print archiving
    • Pre-print on authors own website, Institutional or Subject Repository
    • Post-print on authors own website, Institutional or Subject Repository
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • On a non-profit server
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set statements to accompany deposits (see policy)
    • Publisher will deposit to PMC on behalf of NIH authors.
    • STM: Science, Technology and Medicine
    • SSH: Social Science and Humanities
    • 'Taylor & Francis (Psychology Press)' is an imprint of 'Taylor & Francis'
  • Classification
    ​ yellow

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This essay explores the intervolvement of attentional practice and discursive action. Drawing on Michael Polanyi's phenomenology, I examine occasions when discourse does not sound like deliberate utterance and when attention does not look rationally focused—but when both are rhetorically inventive. Taking a cue from the growing (though conceptually and historically thin) self-help literature on attention and mindfulness, I examine the sometimes distracting speech of that paragon of attentiveness, the fictional detective. Dorothy Sayers’ witty sleuth, Wimsey, and The Wire's profane investigators, Bunk and McNulty, practice transgressive speech that seems nonsensical, but which animates and extends indirect attention for the sake of solving problems in bewildering conditions. These case studies in crime fiction strengthen rhetorical scholarship on embodiment, affect, and verbal inadvertency by locating deliberative dimensions in apparently indeliberate discourses. This essay concludes by conceptualizing the communicative practice that modulates indirect attention, referring to its transgressive nonsensicality as a rhetoric of idiocy.
    Quarterly Journal of Speech 01/2014; 100(1).
  • Quarterly Journal of Speech 01/2014; 100(1).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In the early 1950s, the American Geographical Society, in collaboration with the United States Armed Forces and international pharmaceutical corporations, instituted a Medical Geography program whose main initiative was the Atlas of Disease, a map series that documented the global spread of various afflictions such as polio, malaria, even starvation. The Atlas of Disease, through the stewardship of its director, Jacques May, a French-American physician trained in colonial Hanoi, evidenced the ways in which cartography was rhetorically appropriated in the Cold War as a powerful visual discourse of development and modernization, wherein both the data content of the maps and their stylistic forms collaborated to produce a compelling division between the so-called First and Third Worlds. In addition, the atlas' connections between the academic knowledge production of the American Geographical Society, the national security interests of the US government, and the market building of the medical industry displayed the ways in which development was a multilayered and essentially spatialized discourse of American power and ideology.
    Quarterly Journal of Speech 01/2014; 100(1).
  • Quarterly Journal of Speech 01/2014; 100(1).
  • Quarterly Journal of Speech 01/2014; 100(1).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In April of 2009, near the end of National Football League (NFL) quarterback Michael Vick's prison term for dog fighting, NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell proposed Vick might resume his career if he could demonstrate “genuine remorse” for his actions. At the same time, Vick was mapping out a plan, with the help of public relations professionals, for how he would perform in interviews and public appearances. The result was an orchestrated campaign whereby Vick was both imposed upon by and performed through a surveillance-based program of social testing designed to prove that he was forgivable on the grounds of genuine remorse. I maintain that the Vick case represents the power of popular institutions like sports leagues to shape and test conditional standards for forgiving through frameworks of surveillance, therapy, and confession that affirm racialized ideals about social order and authentic interior reform. Through an analysis of the NFL's monitoring and surveillance program, as well as a series of highly publicized interviews, I demonstrate the importance of distancing forgiveness from politics, and examine potential alternatives to conditional forgiveness from within rhetorical studies.
    Quarterly Journal of Speech 01/2014; 100(1).
  • Quarterly Journal of Speech 01/2014; 100(1).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In the summer of 2010, a national controversy erupted suddenly as a majority of Americans protested the building of an Islamic community center near Ground Zero. In this essay, I suggest the so-called “Ground Zero mosque” controversy makes visible the emergence of a rhetoric of traumatic nationalism that articulates suffering to citizenship and reproduces national crisis through a motif of consecration whose upshot is a conservative, bipartisan moralism. An anti-political discourse of victimization masquerading as a memory discourse of righteous sacrifice, traumatic nationalism serves as an alibi that excuses the United States from answering responsibly for the war on terror and prevents critical examination of the state of the union.
    Quarterly Journal of Speech 01/2014; 100(1).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The present analysis explores Dolores Huerta's use of a shifting transcendent persona to balance the sense of mystery surrounding her accomplishments with a performance of normalcy and audience identification. We find, first, that Huerta leveraged her borderland experiences and ideology as rhetorical resources that functioned to facilitate the amalgamation of personae exemplifying her advocacy, and, second, that her shifting transcendent persona's balance of mystery and identification hinged as much upon the manner in which she positioned audience members to perceive themselves as it did upon the manner in which she positioned them to perceive her own exceptional normalcy.
    Quarterly Journal of Speech 01/2013; 99(4).
  • Quarterly Journal of Speech 01/2013; 99(1).
  • Quarterly Journal of Speech 01/2013; 99(2).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This essay inquires into the pedagogical and political dimensions of art in the contemporary moment. Specifically, it seeks to reanimate Fredric Jameson's notion of “cognitive mapping,” which he introduced as a response to the postmodern problem of representing the social totality. To that end, the essay begins by explicating the twin impulses of cognitive mapping. It, then, undertakes a sustained rhetorical analysis of Jens Lien's award-winning 2006 Norwegian film, The Bothersome Man, demonstrating how the film employs entropic satire to, at once, map and critique the cultural logic of late capitalism. The essay concludes by reflecting on the important contributions rhetorical scholars can make to a renewed interest in cognitive mapping.
    Quarterly Journal of Speech 01/2013; 99(3).
  • Quarterly Journal of Speech 01/2013; 99(4).
  • Quarterly Journal of Speech 01/2013; 99(2).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: As an ideal, democracy has long been understood as a balance between oligarchy and ochlocracy. In practice, this balancing act has to be articulated within specific socio cultural contexts. This essay examines one such articulation in the discursive response to the assassination of President McKinley in 1901 at the hands of self-proclaimed anarchist Leon Czolgosz. It does so by understanding McKinleyapos;s death as domestic trauma—a shocking event that threatened the nation's democratic identity. In response to this traumatic event, this essay ultimately argues a rationalizing discourse emerged that scapegoated the shooter as a weak-minded immigrant and offered a vision of democracy that required citizens have the fitness to rise above group identities and passions and take on the sober-minded responsibility of self-governance.
    Quarterly Journal of Speech 01/2013; 99(2).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Employing the theoretical perspective known as performativity, this essay rethinks the notion of racial discourse. The essay takes biomedicine as an important site wherein racial ontologies are performatively enacted and argues that we need to historicize race and rhetoric in order to understand how racial ideology adapts to different material conditions. The particular case of breast cancer genomics is examined to explore the ways in which racial discourse depends upon another bodily attribute: sex. By situating the case study within a broader history of race and sex, the essay delineates how the body within breast cancer genomics produces race anew, a rhetorical enactment essential to maintaining a racialized—and racist—social and economic order.
    Quarterly Journal of Speech 01/2013; 99(2).
  • Quarterly Journal of Speech 01/2013; 99(2).
  • Quarterly Journal of Speech 01/2013; 99(4).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This criticism analyzes one epideictic dimension of Disney's Beauty and the Beast to demonstrate how the film's combination of sophisticated rhetorical strategies might cultivate a romanticized understanding of and tolerance toward intimate partner violence among inter-generational audiences. The film departs from earlier legend versions by focusing exclusively on the romantic arc and introducing various kinds of violence and new characters to exercise, interpret, and accommodate that violence. Pivotal to this particular epideictic dimension's operation are Beast's violent acts toward Belle relative to Gaston's violence toward her, adult characters minimizing, justifying, or romanticizing in the presence of a child character the repeated signs of intimate partner violence, and those adults' efforts to facilitate a romance in spite of Beast's violence and Belle's reluctance. Disney featuring child character Chip, with his questions about romance and front-row seat to the title characters' relationship (including violent episodes that resonate with the phases of Walker's Cycle Theory of Violence), underscores a coherent ideology explaining, on the approving community's behalf, the troubling intersection of violence and romance and (unintentionally, yet powerfully) endorsing that ideology's socially conservative, individualistic prescriptions for handling it.
    Quarterly Journal of Speech 01/2013; 99(4).

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