Public Health (PUBLIC HEALTH )

Publisher: Society of Community Medicine (Great Britain); Society of Medical Officers of Health (Great Britain); Royal Institute of Public Health and Hygiene (Great Britain); Society of Public Health (Great Britain); Royal Institute of Public Health (Great Britain), Elsevier

Description

Provides international coverage of preventive medicine, epidemiology, social and community medicine. Key areas include: child health, communicable disease prevention, health promotion and health service planning.

Impact factor 1.48

  • Hide impact factor history
     
    Impact factor
  • 5-year impact
    1.61
  • Cited half-life
    6.00
  • Immediacy index
    0.58
  • Eigenfactor
    0.01
  • Article influence
    0.53
  • Website
    Public Health website
  • Other titles
    Public health (London, England), Public health
  • ISSN
    0033-3506
  • OCLC
    1338322
  • Material type
    Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Journal / Magazine / Newspaper, Internet Resource

Publisher details

Elsevier

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Pre-print allowed on any website or open access repository
    • Voluntary deposit by author of authors post-print allowed on authors' personal website, arXiv.org or institutions open scholarly website including Institutional Repository, without embargo, where there is not a policy or mandate
    • Deposit due to Funding Body, Institutional and Governmental policy or mandate only allowed where separate agreement between repository and the publisher exists.
    • Permitted deposit due to Funding Body, Institutional and Governmental policy or mandate, may be required to comply with embargo periods of 12 months to 48 months .
    • Set statement to accompany deposit
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to journal home page or articles' DOI
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Articles in some journals can be made Open Access on payment of additional charge
    • NIH Authors articles will be submitted to PubMed Central after 12 months
    • Publisher last contacted on 18/10/2013
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This study sought consensus-based indices for quality assessment of the public health service (QAPHS) to evaluate the service quality of public health in Shenzhen and other cities in China. A qualitative study. A list of quality assessment indices was formed based on Donabedian theory. These indices were presented to an expert panel in a two-round Delphi study to establish a consensus view. A weight of indices was established to validate the applicability and practicability of the framework. The specialist authority coefficient and Kendall's W were also calculated based on statistical analysis. A total of 30 experts participated in the Delphi study. Consensus was reached on four first-grade indices, nine second-grade indices and 28 third-grade indices. The specialist authority coefficient (Cr) was high (between 0.88 and 0.92), while Kendall's coefficient (W) of all the indices was >0.5 with statistical significant differences (P < 0.05). This indicated correlation among panelists and had high reliability. A unified and hierarchical quality assessment index framework for public health services was established. The framework should be further tested and improved in practice. Copyright © 2014 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
    Public Health 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Tobacco use is among the most significant public health issues faced by the world today. It is estimated that approximately 5500 adolescents start using tobacco every day in India, adding to the four million youths aged <15 years who are already regular users. School-based smoking prevention programmes have been shown to increase knowledge about the negative effects of tobacco and prevent tobacco use, but the majority of evidence on effectiveness comes from Western countries. This study investigated the impact of a school-based short-term educational intervention regarding tobacco use on adolescents' knowledge, attitudes, intentions and behaviours (KAIB) in Bangalore, India. An intervention trial was conducted among 720 adolescents aged 15-16 years in Bangalore, India. Educational interventions were imparted to all study subjects in a phased manner, along with two interactive sessions held six months apart. The impact of the programme was measured using questionnaires administered before the first intervention (pre-intervention) and after the second intervention (post-intervention). Mean (±standard deviation) pre-intervention KAIB scores of the subjects were 5.9 ± 1.87 (knowledge), 23.6 ± 3.15 (attitude) and 18.9 ± 3.27 (practice), which improved to 7.8 ± 2.01, 26.7 ± 2.43 and 12.3 ± 2.52, respectively, postintervention. The differences in mean KAIB scores were significant (P < 0.0001, df = 1400), suggesting that the intervention had a major positive impact. School-based short-term educational intervention programmes are effective for preventing and reducing tobacco use among Indian adolescents. Copyright © 2014 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
    Public Health 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Human trafficking is as complex human rights and public health issue. The issue of human trafficking for sexual exploitation at large global sporting events has proven to be elusive given the clandestine nature of the industry. This piece examines the issue from a public health perspective. This is a literature review of the 'most comprehensive' studies published on the topic. A PubMed search was done using MeSH terms 'human traffickings' and 'sex trafficking' and 'human rights abuses'. Subheadings included 'statistics and numerical data', 'legislation and jurispudence', 'prevention and control', and 'therapy'. Only papers published in English were reviewed. The search showed that very few well-designed empirical studies have been conducted on the topic and only one pertinent systematic review was identified. Findings show a high prevalence of physical violence among those trafficked compared to non-trafficked women. Sexually transmitted infections and HIV AIDS are prevalent and preventive care is virtually non-existent. Quantifying human trafficking for sexual exploitation at large global sporting events has proven to be elusive given the clandestine nature of the industry. This is not to say that human trafficking for sex as well as forced sexual exploitation does not occur. It almost certainly exists, but to what extent is the big question. It is a hidden problem on a global scale in plain view with tremendous public health implications. Copyright © 2014 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
    Public Health 12/2014;
  • Public Health 12/2014;
  • Public Health 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Obesity and smoking are two leading health risk factors and consume substantial health care resources. This study estimates and tracks annual per-capita health care expenses associated with obesity and smoking among U.S. adults aged 18 years and older from 1998 to 2011. Retrospective data analysis. Individual-level data came from the National Health Interview Survey 1996-2010 waves and the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey 1998-2011 waves. Annual per-capita health care expenses associated with obesity and smoking were estimated in two-part models, accounting for individual characteristics and sampling design. Obesity and smoking were associated with an increase in annual per-capita total health care expenses (2011 US$) by $1360 (95% confidence interval: $1134-$1587) and $1046 ($846-$1247), out-of-pocket expenses by $143 ($110-$176) and $70 ($37-$104), hospital inpatient expenses by $406 ($283-$529) and $405 ($291-$519), hospital outpatient expenses by $164 ($119-$210) and $95 ($52-$138), office-based medical provider service expenses by $219 ($157-$280) and $117 ($62-$172), emergency room service expenses by $45 ($28-$63) and $57 ($44-$71), and prescription expenses by $439 ($382-$496) and $251 ($199-$302), respectively. From 1998 to 2011, the estimated per-capita expenses associated with obesity and smoking increased by 25% and 30% for total health care, 41% and 48% for office-based medical provider services, 59% and 66% for emergency room services, and 62% and 70% for prescriptions but decreased by 16% and 15% for out-of-pocket health care expenses, 3% and 0.3% for inpatient care, and 6% and 2% for outpatient care, respectively. Health care expenses associated with obesity and smoking were considerably larger among women, Non-Hispanic whites, and older adults compared with their male, racial/ethnic minority, and younger counterparts. Health care costs associated with obesity and smoking are substantial and increased noticeably during 1998-2011. They also vary significantly across gender, race/ethnicity and age. Copyright © 2014 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
    Public Health 12/2014;
  • Public Health 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: To estimate the economic burden of coronary heart disease (CHD) in a given year (2010), including direct and indirect costs, and examine the impact of contextual and individual socio-economic (SES) predictors on the costs of CHD among adults in rural southwest China. Cross-sectional community survey. In total, 4595 adults (aged ≥18 years) participated in this study. A prevalence-based cost-of-illness approach was used to estimate the economic burden of CHD. Information on demographic characteristics of the study population and the economic consequences of CHD was obtained using a standard questionnaire. Multilevel linear regression was used to model the variation in costs of CHD. In the study population, the overall prevalence of CHD was 2.9% (3.5% for males, 2.3% for females). The total cost of CHD was estimated to be US$17 million. Inpatient hospitalizations represented the main component of direct costs of CHD, and direct costs accounted for the greatest proportion of the economic burden of CHD. Males were more likely to have a higher economic burden of CHD than females. A positive association was found between the individual's level of education and the economic burden of CHD. Residence in a higher-income community was associated with higher costs related to CHD. This study found that both contextual and individual SES were closely associated with the costs of CHD. Future strategies for CHD interventions and improved access to affordable medications to treat and control CHD should focus on less-educated individuals and communities with lower SES. Copyright © 2014 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
    Public Health 12/2014;
  • Public Health 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: A thorough understanding of the processes involved in lifestyle interventions is needed in order to close the gap between research and daily practice. This study explored the processes involved in the provision of a lifestyle intervention to patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) by health care professionals in primary care. Mixed methods. Health care professionals were asked to intensify lifestyle interventions for patients with T2DM in a routine care setting. Data were collected by serial interviews with health care professionals and patients, recorded consultations, an activity questionnaire and biomedical information. Qualitative data were analysed using a framework analysis with a phenomenological approach. The lifestyle intervention developed by the health care professionals included motivational interviewing, a nutrition and physical activity diary, and a multidisciplinary approach [physiotherapist, dietician, general practitioner and diabetes practice nurse (DPN)]. Participants and health care professionals were positive about the intervention, and patients were more active (P = 0.027), lost weight (P = 0.031) and had lower levels of glycated haemoglobin (P = 0.012). However, qualitative data showed that patients were passive during the consultation, and did not ask questions about ways to improve their lifestyle. DPNs did not use motivational interviewing optimally; provided patients with information that was difficult to understand; and were easily satisfied with the efforts of the patients. Lifestyle intervention for patients with T2DM is difficult in routine primary care. DPNs should adapt to the knowledge level of the patients, and patients must be stimulated to take an active role in their treatment. Patients and health care professionals should become equal partners in determining mutually agreeable treatment plans and goals. Copyright © 2014 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
    Public Health 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: There is currently no documentation on the availability and implementation of policies related to men's health in Asia. This Delphi study aimed to achieve an Asian consensus on men's health policy based on the opinions and recommendations from men's health key opinion leaders. A two-phase Delphi online survey was used to gather information from men's health stakeholders across Asian countries. All stakeholders were invited to participate in the survey through men's health conferences, personal contacts, recommendations from international men's health organizations and snowballing method. Stakeholders were asked about their concerns on 17 men's health key issues as well as their opinion on the availability and recommendations on men's health policies and programmes in their countries. There were a total of 128 stakeholders (policy makers, clinicians, researchers and consumers), from 28 Asian countries, who responded in the survey. Up to 85% of stakeholders were concerned about various men's health issues in Asia and in their respective country, particularly in smoking, ischaemic heart disease and high blood pressure. There is a lack of men's health policies and programmes in Asia (availability = 11.6-43.5%) and up to 92.9% of stakeholders recommended that these should be developed. These findings call for policy change and development, and more importantly a concerted effort to elevate men's health status in Asia. Copyright © 2014 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
    Public Health 12/2014;
  • Public Health 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: In planning, designing, procuring and ensuring delivery of improved services ('commissioning') for the school age population, the outcomes should be students who are healthy to learn and who learn to be healthy. Intuitively, linking education and health development together within the wider learning environment seems a good start to planning school health. However there has been a shortage of either theoretical models that can span different settings or experimental research that demonstrates improved community health. Is there evidence that the wider learning environment provided in a school is valuable in improving health? An initial scoping exercise identified domains of health where there was a promise of health gain. International literature on school health outcomes using the framework of Asset-Based Community Development (ABCD) has been reviewed. It was found that research on a variety of interventions was relevant to schools as an asset for public health. Effective areas for health gain were identified for local planning and evaluation using this community model. However, none of the studies reviewed was originally designed to test schools as assets and most of the research lacked methodological rigour, especially regarding children in low income countries. The ABCD model could help national governments develop resources for both education and health, but there is a global need to generate better quality evidence. Then people who commission for their local communities can make more effective use of these multifaceted assets to improve health and education outcomes for children. Copyright © 2014 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
    Public Health 12/2014;
  • Public Health 11/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: A significant amount of literature documents the challenges of undertaking evaluative research on the public health impacts of interventions in the non-health sector. However, few studies have investigated why such studies are undertaken despite the undoubted challenges. Taking housing as a case study, the authors aimed to identify the factors contributing to successful evaluative research in the non-health sector.Study designQualitative interview study.Methods Semi-structured interviews with 16 investigators involved in seven successful experimental studies of housing interventions across the UK, analysed using thematic content analysis.ResultsIntervention studies were undertaken when existing collaborative links enabled ‘windows of opportunity’ to be exploited. Although different ‘cultures of evidence’ were reported across the collaborating teams, these did not necessarily map onto the public health research/non-academic divide, and did not undermine collaborative work when all parties could gain from taking part in the research.Conclusions Focussing on success, rather than failure, suggests that to encourage the uptake of evaluative evidence in the non-health sector, efforts might be better directed at fostering opportunities for partnership building rather than simply on educating non-health partners in the principles of academic research.
    Public Health 11/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Obesity is a national epidemic that imposes direct medical and indirect economic costs on society. Recent scholarly inquiries contend that obesity also contributes to global warming. The paper investigates the relationship between greenhouse gas emissions and obesity.Study designCross-sectional state-level data for the year 2010.Methods Multiple regression analysis using least squares with bootstrapped standard errors and quantile regression.ResultsStates with higher rates of obesity are associated with higher CO2 and CH4 emissions (p < 0.05) and marginally associated with higher N2O emissions (p < 0.10), net of other factors. Reverting to the obesity rates of the year 2000 across the entire United States could decrease greenhouse gas emissions by about two percent, representing more than 136 million metric tons of CO2 equivalent.Conclusions Future studies should establish clear causality between obesity and emissions by using longitudinal data while controlling for other relevant factors. They should also consider identifying means to net out the potential effects of carbon sinks, conversion of CH4 to energy, cross-state diversion, disposal, and transfer of municipal solid waste, and potentially lower energy consumption from increased sedentariness.
    Public Health 11/2014;
  • Public Health 11/2014;
  • Public Health 11/2014;