Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases (PROG CARDIOVASC DIS )

Publisher: Elsevier

Description

Each issue of Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases comprehensively covers a single topic in the understanding and treatment of disorders of the heart and circulation. Some issues contain special articles, definitive reviews that capture the state-of-the-art in the management of particular clinical problems in cardiology. Also appearing at least twice per volume is a feature article comparing clinical trials of a single therapeutic problem of interest to cardiologists and internal medicine physicians.

  • Impact factor
    4.00
    Show impact factor history
     
    Impact factor
  • 5-year impact
    4.64
  • Cited half-life
    6.40
  • Immediacy index
    0.17
  • Eigenfactor
    0.01
  • Article influence
    1.66
  • Website
    Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases website
  • Other titles
    Progress in cardiovascular diseases
  • ISSN
    0033-0620
  • OCLC
    1624043
  • Material type
    Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Journal / Magazine / Newspaper, Internet Resource

Publisher details

Elsevier

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Pre-print allowed on any website or open access repository
    • Voluntary deposit by author of authors post-print allowed on authors' personal website, arXiv.org or institutions open scholarly website including Institutional Repository, without embargo, where there is not a policy or mandate
    • Deposit due to Funding Body, Institutional and Governmental policy or mandate only allowed where separate agreement between repository and the publisher exists.
    • Permitted deposit due to Funding Body, Institutional and Governmental policy or mandate, may be required to comply with embargo periods of 12 months to 48 months .
    • Set statement to accompany deposit
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to journal home page or articles' DOI
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Articles in some journals can be made Open Access on payment of additional charge
    • NIH Authors articles will be submitted to PubMed Central after 12 months
    • Publisher last contacted on 18/10/2013
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Physical inactivity is one of the most important contributors to the global burden of disease and has become a global public health priority. We review the evidence on physical activity (PA) interventions, actions, and strategies that have the greatest potential to increase PA at the population level. Using the socio-ecological framework to conceptualize PA interventions, we show that PA can be targeted at multiple levels of influence and by multiple sectors outside the health system. Examples of promoting PA on a national scale are presented from Finland, Canada, Brazil, and Colombia. A strong policy framework, consistent investment in public health programs, multi-sectoral support and actions, and good surveillance characterize each of these success stories. Increasing PA globally will depend on successfully applying and adapting these lessons around the world taking into account country, culture, and context.
    Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases 09/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The worldwide impact of physical activity (PA) on health consequences has received increasing attention . At this point in time, there is little disagreement that increasing levels of PA is an important aspect of public health worldwide. The world literature on PA, exercise and fitness has also grown exponentially since the early 1990's. It is clear that there is a voluminous literature in this area of research and the exponential increase in the number of manuscripts has gained substantial momentum since the year 2000. Given the importance of PA research in regards to health outcomes, and apparent popularity of such research (based on the number of manuscripts published), one could argue that the viability and future of PA is indeed bright. However, one could also assume a different view, that although the field is popular, it is saturated and we already know what we need to know regarding the impact of PA on public health. Much of the future viability of PA research will also be dependent on funding sources available. It is also possible that the impact of PA may vary around the world, thus the "global" impact of PA research may be dependent on location. This review will discuss what we perceive as the current landscape and the future of PA research in three select areas of the world, the United States, South America and Asia.
    Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases 09/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Health statistics and epidemiologic studies have shown that Hispanics live longer than Non Hispanic Whites, despite a high prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors and an average low socioeconomic status, both strong predictors of CVD and mortality. This phenomenon has been dubbed " The Hispanic paradox" and has been demonstrated in old and contemporary cohorts. To date, no factor has been identified that could explain this phenomenon, but socio demographic factors, dietary intake and genetic predisposition have been proposed as possible explanations for the Hispanic paradox. As with the French paradox, where French were found to have a lower rate of coronary heart disease (CHD), helped to identify the role of the Mediterranean diet and wine consumption in the prevention of CHD, the Hispanic paradox may eventually help to identify factors with a protective effect against CHD. This article describes the current evidence supporting the existence of the Hispanic paradox and provides a brief review on the possible explanations.
    Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases 09/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: In recent years, experience with transcatheter aortic valve implantation has led to improved outcomes in elderly patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS) who may not have previously been considered for intervention. These patients are often frail with significant comorbid conditions. As the prevalence of AS increases, there is a need for improved assessment parameters to determine the patients most likely to benefit from this novel procedure. This review discusses the diagnostic criteria for severe AS and the trials available to aid in the decision to refer for aortic valve procedures in the elderly.
    Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases 09/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The incidence and prevalence of cardiovascular (CV )-related morbidity and mortality significantly increase with age. In the elderly, hypercholesterolemia with elevated total and low-density-lipoprotein cholesterol is a significant predictor of incident and recurrent CV disease. Multiple lines of evidence have established the benefit of statin therapy to lower cholesterol levels and reduce the risk of CV events as well as prevent progression of subclinical atherosclerotic disease. Elderly patients, particularly those older than 75 years, have not been well represented in randomized clinical trials evaluating lipid lowering therapy. The limited available data from clinical trials do support the benefit of statin therapy in the elderly population. Based upon these data, cholesterol treatment guidelines endorse statin therapy as the primary treatment of hypercholesterolemia in elderly patients, though caution is recommended given the greater number of co-morbid conditions and concern for poly-pharmacy common in the elderly. Additional research is needed to better establish the benefit of statin therapy in the elderly within the context of reducing CV risk, minimizing side effects, and improving overall quality of life.
    Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases 09/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease is extremely common in older adults and the potential benefits of secondary prevention are perhaps greater in this population than in younger patients. While there is good evidence that secondary prevention efforts are justified in patients up to 80 years of age, limited data are available on secondary prevention in octogenarians and there is no evidence to guide treatment in patients ≥ 90 years of age. Further, the value of secondary prevention may be confounded by prevalent comorbidities, polypharmacy, and limited life expectancy. It is therefore essential that all management decisions be made in relation to individual preferences and goals of care, with understanding by patients that benefits as well as risks may increase with age. Furthermore, research is needed to refine markers to better delineate which older adults are most likely to benefit from preventive therapies.
    Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases 09/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Cardiac imaging plays an important role in coronary artery disease (CAD), congestive heart failure (HF) and valvular heart disease (VHD) in the elderly. Imaging defines the structure and function of the cardiac system, refining the understanding of patients’ anatomy and physiology and informing a host of clinical care decisions, including prognosis. Yet there is a paucity of evidence to guide the rational use of many imaging modalities in patients of advanced age, a population with considerable clinical heterogeneity, high prevalence and burden of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and atypical presentations of CVD. This paper discusses important considerations for cardiac imaging for older adults, particularly in regard to CAD, VHD and HF, then presents domains for future research to produce data that would inform clinical care guidelines, appropriate use criteria and imaging lab protocols to address the unique needs of the fast-growing elderly population.
    Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases 09/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of mortality in older adults, however, in the elderly accurate stratification of CVD risk to guide management decisions is challenging due to the heterogeneity of the population. Conventional assessment of CVD and therapeutic risk is based on extrapolation of guidelines developed from evidence demonstrated in younger individuals and fails to weight the increased burden of complications and multimorbidity. Using a comprehensive geriatric based assessment of older adults with CVDthat includes an estimation of complexity of multimorbidity as well as traditional risk assessment provides a patient centered approach that allows for management decisions congruent with patient preferences. This review examines the complexity of risk stratification in adults over 80, assessment methods to augment current tools and the basis of management decisions to optimize patient and family centered goals.
    Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases 09/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The prevalence of individuals who are overweight or obese is growing exponentially in the United States and worldwide. This growth is concerning, as both overweightness and obesity lead to impaired physical function, decreased quality of life, and increased risk of chronic diseases. Additionally, overweightness and obesity are related to increased mortality among young and middle-aged adults. This weight-related risk of mortality is more ambiguous among older adults. In fact, obesity may be protective in this population, a relationship described as the “obesity paradox”. In this review we discuss the effects of overweightness and obesity among the elderly on cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality, along with the risks of low weight. We conclude by discussing the goal of weight management among older adults, focusing particularly on benefits of preserving lean body mass and muscular strength while stabilizing body fat. Ideally, overweight or mildly obese elderly individuals should devise a plan with their physicians to maintain their weight, while increasing lean body mass through a plan of healthy diet, behavioral therapy, and physical activity.
    Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases 09/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: There is increasing momentum to measure frailty in clinical practice given its proven value as a predictor of adverse outcomes, particularly in elderly patients with cardiovascular disease. The number of randomized clinical trials targeting frail older adults has been modest to date. Therefore, we systematically searched the ClinicalTrials.gov registry in order to review the frailty intervention trials that had been actively initiated or completed but not yet published. The interventions studied were exercise training in 2 trials, nutritional supplementation in 3 trials, combined exercise plus nutritional supplementation in 5 trials, pharmaceutical agents in 5 trials, multi-dimensional programs in 2 trials, and home-based services in 3 trials. Their respective study designs, populations, interventions, and planned outcomes of interest are presented in this article.
    Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases 09/2014;
  • Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases 09/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Dietary non-adherence to sodium restriction is an important contribution to heart failure (HF) symptom burden, particularly in older adults. While knowledge, skills, and attitudes towards sodium restriction are important, sodium intake is closely linked to the ability to taste salt. The ‘hedonic shift’ occurs when sodium restriction induces changes in an individual’s salt taste that lower subsequent salt affinity. Older adults often have compromised salt taste and higher dietary salt affinity due to age-related changes. Older HF patients may have additional loss of salt taste and elevated salt appetite due to comorbid conditions, medication use, and micronutrient or electrolyte abnormalities, creating a significant barrier to dietary adherence. Induction of the hedonic shift has the potential to improve long-term dietary sodium restriction and significantly impact HF outcomes in older adults.
    Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases 09/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Hispanic Americans (HA) are a significant and increasing segment of the population who must be considered in future health planning. HA, compared to European Americans (EA), have a lower prevalence of coronary artery disease, but higher burden of cardiovascular disease risk factors. It remains unclear if this observation termed the ‘Hispanic Paradox’ also exists for vascular beds outside the heart. We present a review of the literature which suggests that this paradox may also exist for arteries in the extremities and neck.
    Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases 08/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: This study estimates the percentage of health care expenditures in the non-institutionalized United States (U.S.) adult population associated with levels of physical activity inadequate to meet current guidelines. Leisure-time physical activity data from the National Health Interview Survey (2004–2010) were merged with health care expenditure data from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (2006–2011). Health care expenditures for inactive (i.e., no physical activity) and insufficiently active adults (i.e., some physical activity but not enough to meet guidelines) were compared with active adults (i.e., ≥ 150 minutes/week moderate-intensity equivalent activity) using an econometric model. Overall, 11.1% (95% CI: 7.3, 14.9) of aggregate health care expenditures were associated with inadequate physical activity. When adults with any reported difficulty walking due to a health problem were excluded, 8.7% (95% CI: 5.2, 12.3) of aggregate health care expenditures were associated with inadequate physical activity. Increasing adults’ physical activity to meet guidelines may reduce U.S. health care expenditures.
    Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases 08/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Regular exercise and a physically active lifestyle have favorable effects on health. Several issues related to this theme are addressed in this report. A comment on the requirements of personalized exercise medicine and in-depth biological profiling along with the opportunities that they offer is presented. This is followed by a brief overview of the evidence for the contributions of genetic differences to the ability to benefit from regular exercise. Subsequently, studies showing that mutations in TP53 influence exercise capacity in mice and humans are succinctly described. The evidence for effects of exercise on endothelial function in health and disease also is covered. Finally, changes in cardiac and skeletal muscle in response to exercise and their implications for patients with cardiac disease are summarized. Innovative research strategies are needed to define the molecular mechanisms involved in adaptation to exercise and to translate them into useful clinical and public health applications.
    Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases 08/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) produce almost a million deaths a year in Latin America (LA), becoming the main cause of death in the last years, and it is estimated that the number of deaths in the region attributable to CVD will increase in the near future. This new epidemic is a consequence of the demographic, economic and social changes observed in LA in recent years. Coronary heart disease and stroke causes 42.5 % and 28.8%, respectively of the CVD mortality in the region. Chagas heart involvement and rheumatic heart disease, once a major health problem, are responsible of only 1% of the mortality each. Improving in socioeconomic status, increased life expectancy and high prevalence of risk factors for atherosclerosis have been the major determinants of this marked epidemiologic change.
    Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases 08/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Hispanics are the largest and fastest-growing minority population in the United States, currently comprising about 16.3% (52 million) of the total population. With an increased prevalence of metabolic risk factors in this population, the rate of uncontrolled hypertension (HTN) in Hispanics significantly exceeds the rates observed among non-Hispanic blacks and whites. Unfortunately, data on HTN in Hispanics remains limited due to the under-representation of Hispanics in clinical trials; with most of the data primarily restricted to observational and retrospective subgroup analyses. This article aims to review the available data on prevalence, awareness and control of HTN, risk factors and some of the challenges unique to the Hispanics population. We also discuss treatment strategies derived from large HTN trials that included Hispanics.
    Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases 08/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Echocardiography guidance for interventions in the catheterization laboratory allows for reduction in radiation exposure from fluoroscopy as well as superior anatomic definition and visualization. The additional information provided over fluoroscopy has translated into an increasing use during interventional procedures. Procedures such as transeptal puncture, percutaneous valvular interventions, myocardial biopsy, echo-guided pericardiocentesis and other interventions have evolved to a complexity level that requires combined echocardiographic and fluoroscopic guidance. Different imaging modalities are utilized in the catheterization laboratory including intracardiac echocardiography, two-dimensional (2D) or three-dimensional (3D) transthoracic echocardiography, and 2D or 3D transesophageal echocardiography. This review is intended to provide an overall summary of the impact echocardiography has had in the catheterization laboratory. We will describe how echocardiography is utilized to guide a diverse array of interventional procedures, emphasizing specific practical issues with respect to echocardiographic guidance of interventional procedures and also pointing out the limitations of echocardiography.
    Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases 07/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: It could be argued that the European experience with transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has been central to the success of this novel technology. After all, Europe provided the birthplace for the first clinical TAVR and allowed commercial approval of the early devices long before they were widely available elsewhere. Many of the largest registries are also European, helping to formulate contemporaneous guidelines with the backing of the influential cardiology and cardiothoracic societies. Despite the significant economic downturn that coincided with the availability of transcatheter technology, funding has been largely forthcoming and is increasing year on year. As we await the results of the randomised controlled trials examining TAVI in a lower risk cohort, the European adoption of the TAVR technology appears set to continue.
    Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases 05/2014;