Physical Therapy (PHYS THER )

Publisher: American Physical Therapy Association (1921- ), American Physical Therapy Association

Description

Founded in 1921, Physical Therapy is the official publication of the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) and is an international, scholarly, peer-reviewed journal. Physical Therapy serves APTA members and other health care professionals by (1) documenting basic and applied knowledge related to physical therapy, (2) providing evidence for evidence-based practice in physical therapy, and (3) publishing a variety of research that is relevant to the field, diverse opinions that are based in scholarly arguments, and scientifically credible descriptive articles such as case reports. Physical Therapy, like the profession it serves, strives to enhance the health and well-being of all members of society.

  • Impact factor
    2.78
    Show impact factor history
     
    Impact factor
  • 5-year impact
    3.36
  • Cited half-life
    0.00
  • Immediacy index
    0.59
  • Eigenfactor
    0.01
  • Article influence
    1.01
  • Website
    Physical Therapy website
  • Other titles
    Physical therapy
  • ISSN
    0031-9023
  • OCLC
    1762333
  • Material type
    Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Journal / Magazine / Newspaper, Internet Resource

Publisher details

American Physical Therapy Association

  • Pre-print
    • Archiving status unclear
  • Post-print
    • Archiving status unclear
  • Conditions
    • Publisher will submit a copy of final published version to PubMed Central on behalf of NIH authors
    • Within 4 weeks of publication for release after 6 months from publication
    • Will work with authors of funding agencies requiring deposit in PubMed Central within 6 months.
  • Classification
    ​ white

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Background: Impaired manual dexterity is frequent and disabling in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Therefore, convenient, quick and validated tests for manual dexterity in MS patients are needed. Objective: The aim of this study was to validate the Coin Rotation task (CRT) to examine manual dexterity in patients with MS. Design: Cross-sectional study. Methods: 101 outpatients with MS were assessed with the CRT, the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS), the Scale for the assessment and rating of ataxia (SARA), the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS), and their muscle strength and sensory deficits of the hands were noted. Concurrent validity and diagnostic accuracy of the CRT were determined by comparison with the Nine Hole Peg Test (9HPT). Construct validity was determined by comparison with a valid dexterity questionnaire. Multiple regression analysis was done to explore correlations of the CRT with the EDSS, SARA, MAS, muscle strength and sensory deficits. Results: The CRT correlated significantly with the 9HPT (r=.73, p<.0001) indicating good concurrent validity. The cut-off values for the CRT relative to the 9HPT were 18.75 seconds for the dominant (sensitivity: 81.5%; specificity 80.0%) and 19.25 seconds for the non-dominant hand (sensitivity: 90.3%; specificity: 81.8%) demonstrating good diagnostic accuracy. Furthermore, the CRT correlated significantly with the dexterity questionnaire (r=-.49, p<.0001) indicating moderate construct validity. Multiple regression analyses revealed that the EDSS was the strongest predictor for impaired dexterity. Limitations: Mostly relapsing-remitting MS patients with an EDSS up to 7 were examined. Conclusions: This study validates the CRT as a test that can be used easily and quickly to evaluate manual dexterity in patients with MS.
    Physical Therapy 06/2014;
  • Physical Therapy 10/2013; 93(10):1291.
  • Physical Therapy 04/2013;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Given the prevalence of chronic non-specific neck pain (CNSNP) internationally, attention has increasingly been paid in recent years to evaluate the efficacy of therapeutic exercise (TE) with this condition. PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to conduct a current review of RCTs concerning the effect of TE on pain and disability among people with CNSNP, perform a meta-analysis, and summarize current understanding. DATA SOURCES: Data were obtained from MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, PEDro, and CENTRAL databases from their inception to August 2012. Reference lists of relevant literature reviews were also tracked. STUDY SELECTION: All published randomized trials without any restriction regarding time of publication or language were considered for inclusion. Study subjects had to be symptomatic adults with only CNSNP. DATA EXTRACTION: Two reviewers independently selected the studies, conducted the quality assessment, and extracted the results. Data were pooled in a meta-analysis using a random-effects model. DATA SYNTHESIS: Seven studies met inclusion criteria. TE proved to have medium significant short and intermediate term effects on pain (g=-0,53, 95% CI -0,86 to -0,20, and g=-0,45, 95% CI -0,82 to -0,07 respectively) and medium but not significant short and intermediate term effects on disability (g=-0,39, 95%CI -0,86 to 0,07, and g=-0,46, 95% CI -1,00 to -0,08). LIMITATIONS: Only one study investigated the effect of TE on pain and disability at follow-up longer than 6 months after intervention. CONCLUSIONS: Consistent with other reviews, the results support the use of TE in the management of CNSNP. In particular, a significant overall effect size was found supporting TE for its effect on pain in both the short and intermediate terms.
    Physical Therapy 04/2013;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Background and Purpose Disability in patients with facial paralysis is the result of impairment or loss of complex and multidimensional functions of the face, including expression of emotions, facial identity, and communication. However, the majority of interventions for facial paralysis are unidimensional and impairment oriented. Thus, a functional training program intended to address various dimensions of disability caused by facial paralysis was devised. This patient-centered, multidimensional approach to the rehabilitation of people with facial paralysis consists of patient education, functional training, and complementary exercises. This approach is focused on various dimensions of disability, including the physical, emotional, and social dimensions, by encouraging context-specific facial functions, positive coping strategies, and social interaction skills. Case Description The patient was a 25-year-old woman with chronic complete right facial paralysis caused by a postoperative complication of ear surgery. The patient's problems were evaluated with the Facial Disability Index (physical function subscale score=45/100, social/well-being function subscale score=28/100) and an informal interview exploring her experiences and priorities. Outcomes After 8 weeks of functional training, the patient showed considerable improvement in facial functions (physical function subscale score=95/100, social/well-being function subscale score=100/100) and reported positive changes in social interactions and interpersonal relationships. Discussion The use of a functional training program was associated with positive changes in emotional expression, psychosocial function, and social integration, thus contributing to reduced disability of a person with chronic facial paralysis.
    Physical Therapy 04/2013; 92(4):605-613.
  • Michele A. Lobo, Regina T. Harbourne, Stacey C. Dusing, Sarah Westcott McCoy
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This perspective article provides support for 4 interrelated tenets: grounded perceptual-motor experience within cultural and social contexts forms cognition; exploration through early behaviors, such as object interaction, sitting, and locomotion, broadly facilitates development; infants and children with limited exploration are at risk for global developmental impairments; and early interventions targeting exploratory behaviors may be feasible and effective at advancing a range of abilities across developmental domains and time. These tenets emphasize that through the promotion of early perceptual-motor behaviors, broader, more global developmental advancements can be facilitated and future delays can be minimized across domains for infants and children with special needs. Researchers, educators, and clinicians should build on these tenets to further demonstrate the effectiveness of targeted early interventions. The goals of these interventions should be not only to advance targeted perceptual-motor skills in the moment but also to more broadly advance future abilities and meet the early intervention goal of maximizing children's learning potential.
    Physical Therapy 01/2013; 93(1):94-103.
  • Michele A. Lobo, Regina T. Harbourne, Stacey C. Dusing, Sarah Westcott-McCoy
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This perspective article provides support for 4 interrelated tenets: grounded perceptual-motor experience within cultural and social contexts forms cognition; exploration through early behaviors, such as object interaction, sitting, and locomotion, broadly facilitates development; infants and children with limited exploration are at risk for global developmental impairments; and early interventions targeting exploratory behaviors may be feasible and effective at advancing a range of abilities across developmental domains and time. These tenets emphasize that through the promotion of early perceptual-motor behaviors, broader, more global developmental advancements can be facilitated and future delays can be minimized across domains for infants and children with special needs. Researchers, educators, and clinicians should build on these tenets to further demonstrate the effectiveness of targeted early interventions. The goals of these interventions should be not only to advance targeted perceptual-motor skills in the moment but also to more broadly advance future abilities and meet the early intervention goal of maximizing children's learning potential.
    Physical Therapy 01/2013; 93:94-103.
  • Physical Therapy 01/2012; 26(1):29-39.
  • Physical Therapy 01/2012;
  • Physical Therapy 01/2011;
  • Physical Therapy 07/2009;
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The interpretation of the results of previous anti-osteoporosis interventions after spinal cord injury (SCI) is undermined by incomplete information about the intervention dose or patient adherence to dose requirements. Rehabilitation research as a whole traditionally has struggled with these same issues. The purpose of this case report is to offer proof of the concepts that careful dose selection and surveillance of patient adherence should be integral components in rehabilitation interventions. A 21-year-old man with T4 complete paraplegia (7 weeks) enrolled in a unilateral soleus muscle electrical stimulation protocol. Compressive loads applied to the tibia approximated 1.4 times body weight. Over 4.8 years of home-based training, data logging software provided surveillance of adherence. Soleus muscle torque and fatigue index adaptations to training as well as bone mineral density (BMD) adaptations in the distal tibia were measured. The patient performed nearly 8,000 soleus muscle contractions per month, with occasional fluctuations. Adherence tracking permitted intervention when adherence fell below acceptable values. The soleus muscle torque and fatigue index increased rapidly in response to training. The BMD of the untrained tibia declined approximately 14% per year. The BMD of the trained tibia declined only approximately 7% per year. The BMD was preferentially preserved in the posterior half of the tibia; this region experienced only a 2.6% annual decline. Early administration of a load intervention, careful estimation of the loading dose, and detailed surveillance of patient adherence aided in the interpretation of a patient's adaptations to a mechanical load protocol. These concepts possess wider applicability to rehabilitation research and should be emphasized in future physical therapy investigations.
    Physical Therapy 04/2008; 88(3):387-96.

Related Journals