Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research (SCAND J EDUC RES )

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

Description

The Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research is an international refereed journal focusing on central ideas and themes in educational thinking and research. The journal welcomes reports on philosophical, historical, comparative, experimental and survey studies and has no preferences - except quality - concerning the authors' choices of methodological perspectives. It also encourages scholarly discussions on vital concepts, new issues and themes of importance for education in the future. The journal sells to over fifty countries and is abstracted and indexed in over fifteen current awareness titles. In 1996 the journal celebrated its 40th anniversary by holding a gathering of all former editors and editorial board members in Stockholm.

  • Impact factor
    0.27
  • 5-year impact
    0.00
  • Cited half-life
    8.80
  • Immediacy index
    0.00
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
    0.00
  • Website
    Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research website
  • Other titles
    Scandinavian journal of educational research (Online)
  • ISSN
    0031-3831
  • OCLC
    45090750
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Taylor & Francis

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Some individual journals may have policies prohibiting pre-print archiving
    • On author's personal website or departmental website immediately
    • On institutional repository or subject-based repository after either 12 months embargo for STM, Behavioural Science and Public Health Journals or 18 months embargo for SSH journals
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • On a non-profit server
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set statements to accompany deposits (see policy)
    • The publisher will deposit in on behalf of authors to a designated institutional repository including PubMed Central, where a deposit agreement exists with the repository
    • STM: Science, Technology and Medicine
    • SSH: Social Science and Humanities
    • Publisher last contacted on 25/03/2014
    • 'Taylor & Francis (Psychology Press)' is an imprint of 'Taylor & Francis'
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: With a point of departure in the concept of democracy, this article aims to show how Swedish Popular Adult Education influenced the content of the established school system in Sweden. The Popular Adult Education and established school systems are studied through their relation to democracy, based on curricula, as well as on visionary and political steering documents. In accordance with conceptual history, the study shows how Popular Adult Education and the established school, with their different spaces of experience and references to separate traditions, gradually became accommodated through a common horizon of expectations about the importance of democracy. When this coalescence appeared, an administrative shift could be identified and the Popular Adult Education Movement was partially disarmed.
    Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research 01/2015; 59(1).
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    ABSTRACT: The present study concerns Swedish teachers' practices with regard to individual development plans (IDPs), which are mandatory for all students in compulsory school. The conceptual points of departure are taken from Wartofsky's distinctions between primary, secondary, and tertiary artifacts and the concepts of inscription and translation. A total of 15 interviews were carried out with teachers at various stages of Swedish compulsory school grade levels. A typology of three qualitatively different ways of perceiving and working with IDP emerged. The ways in which teachers implement the use of IDPs—that is, their IDP practices—vary depending on perceived purpose and local contextual conditions. In the discussion section, it is argued that the creation of a typology as a way of categorizing practices should be viewed as a way of conceptually generalizing the empirical material. Finally, the results are problematized in terms of the possible implications different practices may have for students.
    Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research 01/2015; 59(1).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The concept of intercultural competences is contested, although it is omnipresent in varied fields of research and practice. Its assessment is also questioned: how can it be done? By whom? When? Should assessment be summative or formative—or both? In order to be able to assess anything, learning and teaching objectives must be clear, coherent, and consistent. Yet intercultural competences are often polysemic and rely heavily on problematic concepts such as (national) culture and identity. Here we revisit the concept and reflect on its use for formative assessment within international teacher education. Having developed a Portfolio of Intercultural Competences (PIC) to be used by student teachers in an English-medium teacher education programme in Finland, we explain how the portfolio came to life (theory, methods) and how it can help develop students' intercultural competences. We report on three components of the portfolio: the students' reflexive and critical essays on five stories of meaningful and/or memorable intercultural encounters written during a course on multicultural education, and focus group discussions amongst the students. We analyze the data with discursive pragmatics, a linguistic method which looks deeper into participants' discourses.
    Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research 01/2015; 59(1).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The high value accorded to the research-based development of education in higher education communities means that researchers in the field have an important role in determining the foci of such efforts. However, it is important to ask whether higher education research is providing answers that satisfy practical educational needs. In this study, themes in higher education research published in Finland during 2000–2008 were compared to those addressed in non-refereed writings published by higher education teachers and students. The thematic analyses, (n = 1,298) focusing on topics related to learning, studying, and their promotion revealed the need for a broader life-wide framework for developing student-centred pedagogy and guidance practices in higher education.
    Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research 01/2015; 59(1).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This paper puts forward the hypothesis that in recent decades, pupils of schools in the western world have been given a new form of individuality. This construction has been nourished by both the demand for emancipation as it was expressed in the critical sociology of education (and pedagogy) and by the neoliberal turn in education policy. It unfolds consequences of such an alliance between romantic and neoliberal individualism, and argues that some of Simmel's concepts might fruitfully be engaged to grasp important aspects of today's educational culture. Against this backdrop, the paper discusses the construction of the new individuality in regard to educational changes in control and discipline, individually adapted education and assessment and finally academic knowledge. Primarily by using examples from the Norwegian case, the paper analyses how recent opinions on these issues can be viewed as different expressions of an educational culture promoting alienation as emancipation.
    Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research 11/2014; 58(6).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Against the background of differing admission selectivity, structure, and status of teacher education in Denmark and Finland, we analyze the extent to which beginning teacher education students differ with respect to previous educational pathways, socio-demographic characteristics, academic self-concepts, and occupational motivations. In both Denmark and Finland, representative groups of first-year teacher education students and final-year upper-secondary students were surveyed. The collected data enabled us to characterize teacher education students in contrast to a baseline reference group of school students and to compare these differences across countries (difference-in-differences estimation). The results of our study indicate that Danish student teachers lag behind their Finnish peers in the valuation of their math skills. In addition, the average motivational profiles of Danish and Finnish teacher education students differ markedly. Implications of our findings are discussed.
    Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research 11/2014; 58(6).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This paper addresses ethical issues in educational research with a focus on the interplay between research ethics and both internal and external quality of research. Research ethics is divided into three domains: (1) ethics within the research community; (2) ethics concerning relationships with individuals and groups directly affected by the research, and (3) ethics related to the external value and role of educational research for various user groups and for the quality of education. The three domains represent different stakeholders and interests. The paper presents an ethical matrix method including three types of matrices. The method combines a systematic and a case-based approach to ethical problems and possibilities. The purpose of the matrices is to serve as a framework for identifying, reflecting, analyzing, and discussing ethical issues and balancing ethical dilemmas in educational research and development.
    Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research 11/2014; 58(6).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Only a few studies have examined the direction of associations between academic achievement, interest, and self-concept of ability simultaneously by using longitudinal data over several school years. To examine the cross-lagged relationships between students' interest, self-concept of ability, and performance in mathematics and reading, longitudinal data from Grade 1 to Grade 7 of comprehensive school was gathered from 216 students. The results showed that, in both reading and math, performance predicted students' subsequent self-concept of ability. Some evidence was also found that math performance predicts subsequent interest in mathematics, and that self-concept of math ability mediates the impact of math performance on interest. No evidence was found for the assumption that self-concept of ability or interest would predict subsequent academic performance.
    Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research 11/2014; 58(6).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The experience of meaning in a learning situation is a stated goal of Knowledge Promotion Reform in Norway. This study, guided by self-determination theory, examines how pursuing intrinsic and extrinsic life goals relates to the experience of meaning in vocational education. The study also examines how learning support, perceived competence, and different types of autonomous motivation are associated with students' experiences of meaning. The sample consisted of health and social care students (N = 405) in upper secondary school. The results indicated that intrinsic goals encouraged meaningfulness in all subjects, whereas extrinsic goals related to perceived meaninglessness in vocational subjects. Learning support, perceived competence, and autonomous types of motivation all have a positive link to students' experiences of meaning, either directly or indirectly.
    Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research 11/2014; 58(6).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This study investigates the nature and role of common ground in group learning of mathematics by means of the analytical constructs of focal projects and contextualization. The analysis investigates two students (12–13 years old) playing a dice game, where their task is to distribute a set of markers based on the total of two dice. The analysis shows how consistency between the students' focal projects became crucial in their progression from a uniform to a non-uniform distribution of the markers used in the game. The task system and concrete manipulatives became important in furthering the students' explorations. In the frame of a frequency context, we also discuss how a contextualization may restrict certain aspects of probability from coming into play during such explorations.
    Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research 09/2014; 58(5).
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    ABSTRACT: This study tested the assumption that the effectiveness of feedback with regard to performance, motivation, and affect is moderated by the learners’ self-concept. A total of 72 sixth-graders completed a web-based interactive learning program. Half of the sample received feedback and the other half received no feedback. Differential feedback effects were detected. For students with a positive academic self-concept, feedback led to a decline in performance and in mood but an increase in effort. With regard to participants with a negative self-concept, feedback worked against the decrease in mood but did not increase performance and motivation. These findings support the claim that feedback effects should be assessed with regard to (1) multiple dimensions and (2) possible moderating variables.
    Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research 09/2014; 58(5).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This article argues that many key theoretical concepts and core areas of study in the educational sciences are couched in paradigmatically vague terms. The shared features of vague terms and two different readings of vagueness are discussed. “Practice”, which is widely used both as a theoretical and an empirical term in the field of educational research, is used as an example of a vague concept that cannot be made more precise, regardless of the quality of definitions or theoretical agreement. Finally, in addition to giving an outline of how the term “practice” is used in the educational sciences, the article refers to contemporary educational research to discuss some of the key methodological implications of vague terms for researchers.
    Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research 09/2014; 58(5).
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    ABSTRACT: A web-based questionnaire was sent to all elementary and middle school teachers in Iceland. The population list, with e-mail addresses, was obtained from the teaching union. The teachers were asked to indicate their major, as well as their experience in teaching Icelandic as classroom teachers or subject teachers. They then rated their competence in teaching Icelandic on a scale from 1–10. Responses were received from 1033 elementary and middle school teachers. Of all teachers, 83.9% had taught Icelandic as classroom teachers and 37.3% had taught Icelandic as subject teachers. All teachers rated their competence as high. Statistically, Icelandic majors and older teachers were significantly more efficacious than others in teaching Icelandic. Those with the lowest competence ratings in teaching Icelandic were sports and home studies majors. However, teachers from all majors had taught Icelandic as classroom teachers, and a significant number of them had taught Icelandic as a subject.
    Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research 09/2014; 58(5).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This study examined the measurement structure, cross-year stability of achievement goals, and mediating effects of achievement goals between self-efficacy and math grades in a national sample of Taiwan middle school students. The measurement model with factorial structure showed good fit to the data. In the panel data (N = 343), four achievement goals showed strong measurement invariance, suggesting factor loadings and intercepts of the items remained invariant across a year. Though mean scores of the four latent achievement goals held quite stable, the rank order of students across two time-points changed more profoundly in the two avoidance goals than in the approached goals. In the cross-sectional data (N = 748), we found approach-based goals were positive mediators between self-efficacy and math grades while avoidance-based goals were negative mediators. This result could be relevant for middle-school students in learning mathematics. Some instructional implications are provided.
    Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research 09/2014; 58(5).
  • Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research 08/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: This article explores how individualized teaching methods, such as the use of work plans, create new student strategies in Norwegian lower secondary classrooms. Work plans, which are frequently set up as instructional tools in Norwegian classrooms, outline different types of tasks and requirements that the students are supposed to do during a specific period of time, normally two or three weeks. The current analyses shed light on what strategies girls and boys use when they approach work plans. Analyses of video observations and interviews with 93 students indicate that while girls tend to complete their plan during the first week or distribute the tasks evenly throughout the period, boys either finish the plan during the first week or postpone their work until the last few days. These findings suggest that the use of work plans might give some students, often low-achieving boys, too much responsibility for their own learning.
    Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research 07/2014; 58(4).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This article claims that the radical potential inherent in the origins of inclusive education has been altered into a tool for protecting the status quo. Drawing on ideas from the essay ‘The Unfinished’ by Thomas Mathiesen (1971), I discuss inclusion as a potential alternative to mainstream education and argue that the potential power of change in this alternative view of schooling is greatly reduced because the inclusion movement, as it is appears today, tends to offer finished solutions. To create a viable alternative to mainstream education requires an understanding of unfinished inclusion because this opens an uncertainty within education that may make the established system more open to change. The unfinished will in this way restore the disruptive potential of inclusive education.
    Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research 07/2014; 58(4).
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    ABSTRACT: A framework based on research on bullying and on educational effectiveness was offered to schools to assist them in developing strategies and actions to improve their learning environment, their policy for teaching, and their evaluation mechanisms in order to reduce bullying. At the beginning and end of the intervention, the Revised Olweus Bully/Victim Questionnaire and a teacher questionnaire measuring three school factors (school policy for teaching, school learning environment, and school evaluation) were administered to the experimental and control groups. This experimental study reveals that the intervention had both a direct impact on the reduction of bullying and an indirect impact through improving the school factors. Implications for research into supporting schools to reduce bullying are given.
    Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research 07/2014; 58(4).
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    ABSTRACT: Latent class Poisson count models are used to analyse a sample of Danish test score results from a cohort of individuals born in 1954–1955, tested in 1968, and followed until 2011. The procedure takes account of unobservable effects as well as excessive zeros in the data. We show that the test scores measure manifest or measured ability as it has evolved over the life of the respondent and is, thus, more a product of the socioeconomic status of the parents and the human capital formation process than some latent or fundamental measure of pure cognitive ability. We find that variables which are not closely associated with traditional notions of intelligence explain a significant proportion of the variation in test scores. This adds to the complexity of interpreting test scores and suggests that school culture and possible incentive problems make it more difficult to understand what the tests measure.
    Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research 07/2014; 58(4).