The Nigerian journal of economic and social studies (Niger J Econ Soc Stud )

Publisher: Nigerian Economic Society

Description

  • Impact factor
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  • 5-year impact
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  • Other titles
    The Nigerian journal of economic and social studies, Nigerian journal of economics and social studies
  • ISSN
    0029-0092
  • OCLC
    2449123
  • Material type
    Periodical
  • Document type
    Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publications in this journal

  • The Nigerian journal of economic and social studies 01/2013; 55(3):49-77.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Climate change is one of the many challenges confronting Africa in the 21st century and Nigeria is not left out. While the impact of climate change can be examined on a global or regional scale, providing country sector-specific impacts is important to help countries take more seriously the need for adopting local solutions that would be useful to mitigate the global dimension of climate change. This study examines the trend of food supply in Nigeria and the possible impact of climate change on food supply in Nigeria. Generalized error correction model and trends deduced from impulse response functions were employed for the analysis. It was found that climate change poses as a threat to Nigeria’s food supply in the short run and long run. And that variation in rainfall patterns and rise in annual mean temperature are potential impact channels of climate change on food supply in Nigeria. Thus, policies on irrigation, drought and emissions through a development plan, would be important to address issues of climate change as relating to food supply in Nigeria. The trends shows that Nigeria’s food supply follows rainfall pattern: increasing as rainfall increases and decreasing as rainfall decreases. For trend on annual mean temperature and food supply, both variables are intertwined in the short run: intersecting each other in a rise and fall wave-like pattern and then moving away from each other while maintaining the wave-like movement. This suggests that with sustained increase in mean annual temperature, food supply (if temperature impact is unchecked), would be suboptimal and volatile. The study suggests that adaptation measures that address changes in temperature, compliment rainfall shortage and prevent drought, are important for addressing climate change and its impact on food supply in Nigeria.
    The Nigerian journal of economic and social studies 07/2012; 54(2):209 - 232.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Climate change is one of the many challenges confronting Africa in the 21st century and Nigeria is not left out. While the impact of climate change can be examined on a global or regional scale, providing country sector-specific impacts is important to help countries take more seriously the need for adopting local solutions that would be useful to mitigate the global dimension of climate change. This study examines the trend of food supply in Nigeria and the possible impact of climate change on food supply in Nigeria. Generalized error correction model and trends deduced from impulse response functions were employed for the analysis. It was found that climate change poses as a threat to Nigeria’s food supply in the short run and long run. And that variation in rainfall patterns and rise in annual mean temperature are potential impact channels of climate change on food supply in Nigeria. Thus, policies on irrigation, drought and emissions through a development plan, would be important to address issues of climate change as relating to food supply in Nigeria. The trends shows that Nigeria’s food supply follows rainfall pattern: increasing as rainfall increases and decreasing as rainfall decreases. For trend on annual mean temperature and food supply, both variables are intertwined in the short run: intersecting each other in a rise and fall wave-like pattern and then moving away from each other while maintaining the wave-like movement. This suggests that with sustained increase in mean annual temperature, food supply (if temperature impact is unchecked), would be suboptimal and volatile. The study suggests that adaptation measures that address changes in temperature, compliment rainfall shortage and prevent drought, are important for addressing climate change and its impact on food supply in Nigeria.
    The Nigerian journal of economic and social studies 07/2012; 54(2):209 - 232.
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract Conventional identification process is mainly carried out phenotypically. This method is misleading in that intraspecific properties may not be properly distinguished between genetically related species. The present study is on molecular identification of some wild Ganoderma species collected from Ondo and Ekiti States, Nigeria. Identification was performed using the internal transcribed sequence (ITS) obtained from Ganoderma species. Comparison of ITS region of wild Ganoderma species from Ikere Ekiti and Akure with ITS sequence of Ganoderma species obtained from NCBI BLAST search revealed the degree of relationship as 92 to 94 %. The closest relatives were Ganoderma mastoporium (AF255183), Ganoderma cupreum (AY569450) and Ganoderma japonicum (AY593864). Phylogenetic tree generated using Win- PAUP4b10 shows that ITS sequence of Ganoderma species obtained from Nigeria are distantly related to ITS sequences of other Ganoderma species in NCBI GenBank. These sequences formed two different clades in the phylogenetic tree. These Ganoderma species from Ikere Ekiti and Akure may be part of the several yet to be identified taxa that are restricted to tropical areas.
    The Nigerian journal of economic and social studies 01/2010; 24(1):2140 - 2144.
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    ABSTRACT: The paper examines the causal relationship between financial development and economic growth in Nigeria using a multivariate vector auto-regression (VAR) model and Granger causality tests. The empirical results show that the direction of causality between financial development and economic growth is demand-following. This means that economic growth leads to financial development and not the other way round. The economic implication of this is that growth-enhancing policies should be vigorously pursued in Nigeria.
    The Nigerian journal of economic and social studies 01/2007; 49(2):209-234.
  • The Nigerian journal of economic and social studies 01/2006; 4(2):139-144.
  • The Nigerian journal of economic and social studies 01/2004; 46(1).
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    ABSTRACT: This paper attempts a comparative analysis of the traditional approach and human development index (HDl) in measuring levels of development with a view to establishing the adequacy of the HDI. Datu from the 1991 Nigerian Census Report published by the National Population Commission and the Year 2000 edition of the National Household Survey by the Federal Office of Statistics were used. The then existing 30 stales of the Federation and the Federal Capital Territory were the subjects of study. For the traditional approach. 26 selected development indicators were used while for the HDI, life expectancy, educational attainment and percentage of actively employed population were used. The multivariate or traditional approach using 26 development indicators identified education related variables as the most important factor that distinguish the developed from the less developed states. Likewise the HDI approach using five variables yielded the same results. Furthermore, the 31 geographical units were classified based 011 their performance on the various variables and ill both analyses, the 14 southern states were identified as the most developed, the 9 middle belt or central states as the moderately developed and the 8 core northern states as the least developed. The study has demonstrated that with fewer variables as used in the HDI, the same results can be achieved as that using several variables which usually contain redundant variables.
    The Nigerian journal of economic and social studies 01/2003; 45(3).
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    ABSTRACT: This study explores the factors that influenced the development of settlements outside the headquarters of the local government area in the old Ondo State. Approximately 2052 settlements in the study area were analyzed with respect to the development of 20 different facilities vis-a-vis their distance from 22 LGA headquarters. Data were derived from the comprehensive Report of the Community Development Statistics Survey of 1991. The analysis showed that extreme cases of polarization occurred in the single centre dominated LGAs of Ado-Ekiti (88%). lkere (85%) and Ondo (62%). It was a/so discovered that I 147 (55.89%) settlements were not provided with any of the 20 facilities considered. A strong negative relationship was observed between the mean distance between the settlement and the LGA headquarters and the number of facilities provided. JEL classification: 018, 022. R53, R58
    The Nigerian journal of economic and social studies 01/2000; 42(1).
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    ABSTRACT: The study examined the pattern of development in Ondo State in regard to social facilities, services and infrastructure in the 26 local government areas (LGAs) in the state. The analysis showed that the indicators of development are not localized but proportionally distributed in the state. This is indicated by the low localization coefficient of 0.24. The degree of localization, however, varies from facility to facility. The most localized facilities are the health facilities where a few local government areas like Akure, Ado-Ekiti and Ondo dominated, while the most widely distributed facilities are the educational facilities. Further analysis revealed inter-local government spatial disparity in the overall level of development. Five local government areas were found to be more developed than the other LGAs, twelve were developed to an average level and seven were classified as being the least developed The study concluded that though there is no polarization of development in the state, this does not mean that efficiency and equity have been achieved in the distribution of social facilities.
    The Nigerian journal of economic and social studies 01/1995; 37(1):41-54.
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    ABSTRACT: "This paper discusses some major determinants of rural-urban migration in Nigeria using the logit estimation technique. It utilizes cross-sectional data generated from a national sample survey of internal migration conducted...between January and March 1988.... The empirical results revealed that the significant determinants of rural-urban migration in Nigeria are income, contact, cost, spoken English, ability to speak two Nigerian languages, distance, marital status, sex and ethnicity. The results further suggest that rural-urban migration is selective of single people and males. Proximity to urban areas where prospective migrants have relatives, friends and townspeople is an important factor."
    The Nigerian journal of economic and social studies 12/1992; 34(3):177-94.
  • The Nigerian journal of economic and social studies 01/1991; 33(3):199-212.
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    ABSTRACT: The relationship between the effective utilization of human resources and successful socioeconomic development in Nigeria is examined. The author argues that Nigeria's current socioeconomic difficulties cannot be blamed on population growth alone, and maintains that "underutilization of human resources; lopsided production and distribution mechanisms; economic depression; and under-developed science and technology system; erratic climatic and agronomic conditions; the illegal exportation of food; [and] corruption and mismanagement of revenue, all constitute forces that simultaneously limit the national capacity to produce more resources for the growing population."
    The Nigerian journal of economic and social studies 04/1988; 30(1):27-42.
  • The Nigerian journal of economic and social studies 08/1986; 28(2):197-211.
  • The Nigerian journal of economic and social studies 12/1984; 26(3):287-313.
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    ABSTRACT: The author compares the population resettlement programs undertaken in connection with the construction of dams at Lake Volta in Ghana and Kainji Lake in Nigeria. Data are from published sources and from a 1971 survey conducted by the author in Nigeria. Differences between the policies and procedures are outlined. It is noted that "these differences resulted in the differences in the patterns of adjustment of the resettled people."
    The Nigerian journal of economic and social studies 04/1984; 26(1):41-55.
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    ABSTRACT: The author examines attitudes toward childbearing by unmarried Nigerian women using data from interviews with a sample of 212 male and female residents of Ibadan, Nigeria, chosen in order to examine the views of educated Nigerians. The respondents were, for the most part, Yorubas, married, and aged 20-40. "In general, the respondents supported the suggestion that women who are unmarried should try and have children of their own, but they are opposed to the suggestion that such women should have as many children as possible, either from the same man or from different men of their choice." The author suggests that "one significant implication of the survey is that the general fertility rate (that is the annual number of births per 1,000 women of reproductive age) may be very high in developing areas not only because married women produce children, but also because women of childbearing ages who are single [are] also encouraged to have children of their own."
    The Nigerian journal of economic and social studies 04/1984; 26(1):135-42.

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