Man in India (Man India )

Description

Man In India considers original writings in the form of broad-based papers, review articles, notes and communications on biological and socio-cultural anthropology, archaeology, linguistics and folk-culture. Manuscripts must be prepared in accordance with the guidelines for prompt action.

  • Impact factor
    0.00
  • 5-year impact
    0.00
  • Cited half-life
    0.00
  • Immediacy index
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  • Eigenfactor
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  • Website
    Man in India website
  • Other titles
    Man in India
  • ISSN
    0025-1569
  • OCLC
    1605851
  • Material type
    Periodical
  • Document type
    Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publications in this journal

  • Man in India 10/2014; 94(4):679-690.
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    ABSTRACT: The present study analyzes age at menarche, menstrual characteristics, body traits and nutritional status on the basis of a cross-sectional data on120 semi-rural adolescent girls aged 13 to 18 year from Yamunanagar, Haryana. On the basis of retrospective method, mean age at menarche was 13.4 years with a standard deviation of 0.99 years. The menstrual flow period continued on an average for 4.43±1.4 days and mean interval between cycles was 27.88± 1.21days. F-ratios based on one-way ANOVA were significant for height, weight and age at menarche showing significant age differences among groups and not for menstrual flow days and mean interval between menstrual periods. Nutritional status was tested on the basis of body mass index (BMI) contrasted with CDC growth data percentiles and subjects were grouped into various BMI categories. One-way ANOVA analysis revealed that girls having BMI higher than 50th percentile of the CDC 2000 growth norms had lower age at menarche than those having BMI less than 50th percentile. The post-hoc Scheffe’s test to study multiple comparisons showed significant results for BMI only and insignificant for age at menarche. Family income was not significantly correlated with body height, weight and age at menarche in this sample.
    Man in India 01/2014; 94(4):679-690..
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    ABSTRACT: Rise of disciplines like ecology and population genetics in the first quarter of the 20th century revolutionized the field of anthropology and this phase continued from 1930-1980. In this phase, emphasis shifted from the typological approach to the study of human biological diversity and evolution by focusing on the mechanisms that brought change and emphasized the population as the unit on which evolutionary forces operate. The role of anthropological genetics and ecology in meeting the challenges of community health led to rapid growth in publications on studies related to genetic associations with diseases. The rise of molecular genetic techniques in 1980s brought another revolution and changed the nature of inquiry. Traditional studies on classical anthropological genetics have almost become extinct. Human genome project has revealed that human genome is composed of merely 24,000 individual structural genes. There has been a rapid growth in published genetic association studies. The more recent studies of genome-wide association have revealed disease susceptibility loci for several common diseases. From the year 2001 to 2008, the number of original articles published on human genome epidemiology increased from 2492 (34 on meta-analysis) to 7659 (206 on meta-analysis), and totaling to 38718 (912 on meta-analysis) showing rapid annual increase in number. Mendelian factors, major genes and polygenes have been found to be associated with many infectious- and non-infectious diseases. Just as in the case of any other trait, human physical performance characteristics are also strongly influenced by our genetic inheritance and by gene-environment interactions, for example 80% of variation in arm eccentric flexor strength and grip strength may be genetically determined. With the advent of DNA technologies, genome-wide genotype data for multiple populations and the development of methods for detecting selection using SNP data have elicited many genome-wide scans for evidence of positive selection in human populations. Some such studies have identified loci with spatial signatures of selection, such as extreme levels of differentiation and correlations with environmental variables. The implications of public health genomics issues fall into various realms of human life. There are hosts of ethical, legal, and social issues (ELSI) surrounding availability of genetic information issues. There is a major dilemma of fairness in the use of genetic information by insurers, employers, courts, schools, adoption agencies, and the military, among others.
    Man in India 01/2014; 94(4):631-656..
  • Man in India 01/2013;
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    ABSTRACT: While the global community is entertaining the notions of postmodernism, Bangladesh is still glued with the malaise of modernism. Anglo-American development theory prescribes underdeveloped and third-world developing countries, like Bangladesh, to undergo the process of modernisation to be developed. According to such development discourse, modernisation denotes a sort of westernisation in social fabrics of third world countries. Since social fabrics constitute the cultural landscape, changes of social fabrics are reflected in cultural transition in existing social-arrangement. Changing mechanism therefore of social fabrics leads to extend what can be termed as symptoms of cultural imperialism upon the cultural setting of underdeveloped and socalled developing countries. The present article concerns such symptoms of cultural imperialism in broad sense in Bangladesh. It contains three objectives. First is to address the theoretical and conceptual framework of cultural imperialism with historical background worldwide. Second is to deal with different changes being taken place that unveil the symptoms of cultural imperialism in social fabrics. Such symptoms generate the malaise of modernism in contemporary urban societies in Bangladesh. Finally, it addresses some respondents’ view on how to resist prospective cultural imperialism in Bangladesh.
    Man in India 03/2012; 92(1):176-192.
  • Man in India 01/2012; 14(3):20-23.
  • Man in India 01/2010; 90(3-4):3-4.
  • Man in India 01/2009; 89:443-456.
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    ABSTRACT: This study made an attempt to measure the health expectancy in terms of disability free life expectancy (DFLE) by using life table techniques and Sullivan’s method in India. To know the duration of life of people in a healthy state, age-specific mortality rate and disability data has been correspondingly used from Sample Registration System based life tables (1999-2003) and National Sample Survey-2002 (58th round). The total life expectancy at birth was found out to be 63 years and disability free life expectancy was 49 years. This means that an individual at the time of his/her birth is expected to live 14 years in a state of ill health. In other way, an individual is expected to live different states of disability years are locomotor (7 years), speech (1 years), visual (2 years), mental (2 years), hearing (2 years) and multiple (2 years). Males are expected to live around 16 years of life with ill health states compared to females with 13 years at birth. Persons living in urban areas are expected to live 16 years of life with ill health as reference to their rural counter parts with 14 years. Persons from the states of Tamil Nadu, Kerala, Andhra Pradesh, Himachal Pradesh and Punjab are expected to live more numbers of years with ill health in India. The implications of the findings were very important in health planning.
    Man in India 01/2009; 89(3):457-468.
  • Man in India 01/2008; 88:1-2.
  • Man in India 01/2007; 87(3&4):279-301.