Journal of the International Phonetic Association

Publisher: International Phonetic Association, Cambridge University Press

Description

  • Impact factor
    0.50
  • 5-year impact
    0.00
  • Cited half-life
    8.20
  • Immediacy index
    0.08
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
    0.00
  • Website
    Journal of the International Phonetic Association website
  • Other titles
    Journal of the International Phonetic Association
  • ISSN
    0025-1003
  • OCLC
    2157736
  • Material type
    Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Journal / Magazine / Newspaper, Internet Resource

Publisher details

Cambridge University Press

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • On authors personal or departmental web page or institutional repository or PubMed Central
    • Pre-print to record acceptance for publication
    • Publisher copyright and source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Authors version may be deposited immediately on acceptance
    • Publishers version/PDF may be used on authors personal or departmental web page any time after publication
    • Publishers version/PDF may be used in an institutional repository or PubMed Central after 12 month embargo
    • Articles in some journals can be made Open Access on payment of additional charge
    • If funding agency rules apply, authors may post articles in PubMed Central 12 months after publication or use Cambridge Open Option
    • Permission (not to be unreasonably withheld) needs to be sought if the author is at a different institution to when the article was originally published.
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This study is an acoustic investigation of the nature and extent of consonant voicing of the stop /b/ in two dialectal varieties of American English spoken in south-central Wisconsin and western North Carolina. The stop /b/ occurred at the juncture of two words such as small bids, in a position between two voiced sonorants, i.e. the liquid /l/ and a vowel. Twenty women participated, ten representing the Wisconsin and ten the North Carolina variety, respectively. Significant dialectal differences were found in the voicing patterns. The Wisconsin stop closures were usually not fully voiced and terminated in a complete silence followed by a closure release whereas North Carolina speakers produced mostly fully voiced closures. Further dialectal differences included the proportion of closure voicing as a function of word emphasis. For Wisconsin speakers, the proportion of closure voicing was smallest when the word was emphasized and it was greatest in non-emphatic positions. For North Carolina speakers, the degree of word emphasis did not have an effect on the proportion of closure voicing. The results suggest different mechanisms by which closure voicing is maintained in these two dialects, pointing to active articulatory maneuvers in North Carolina speakers and passive in Wisconsin speakers.
    Journal of the International Phonetic Association 01/2009; 39(3):313-334.

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