Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry (J PROSTHET DENT )

Publisher: Elsevier

Description

The Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry, now in its 47th year, continues to be a highly respected and trusted resource. With changes made to the Journal in 1997, readers now receive a publication that includes more clinical information and expanded use of color. The Journal is the official publication for 29 leading U.S. and international prosthodontic organizations and is the leading professional journal devoted exclusively to prosthetic and restorative dentistry. It features timely, original articles on the newest techniques, dental materials, and research findings. Color photos illustrate many step-by-step procedures. The Journal serves prosthodontists and dentists in advanced practice. The Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry ranks in the top 17% of the 4,625 scientific journals most frequently cited ( Science Citation Index ).

  • Impact factor
    1.72
    Hide impact factor history
     
    Impact factor
  • 5-year impact
    2.10
  • Cited half-life
    0.00
  • Immediacy index
    0.07
  • Eigenfactor
    0.01
  • Article influence
    0.54
  • Website
    Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry, The website
  • Other titles
    Journal of prosthetic dentistry (Online), The journal of prosthetic dentistry
  • ISSN
    0022-3913
  • OCLC
    38234820
  • Material type
    Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Elsevier

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Pre-print allowed on any website or open access repository
    • Voluntary deposit by author of authors post-print allowed on authors' personal website, arXiv.org or institutions open scholarly website including Institutional Repository, without embargo, where there is not a policy or mandate
    • Deposit due to Funding Body, Institutional and Governmental policy or mandate only allowed where separate agreement between repository and the publisher exists.
    • Permitted deposit due to Funding Body, Institutional and Governmental policy or mandate, may be required to comply with embargo periods of 12 months to 48 months .
    • Set statement to accompany deposit
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to journal home page or articles' DOI
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Articles in some journals can be made Open Access on payment of additional charge
    • NIH Authors articles will be submitted to PubMed Central after 12 months
    • Publisher last contacted on 18/10/2013
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Computer-assisted oral implant surgery offers several advantages over the traditional approach. However, several unexpected procedure-linked adverse events during guided implant placement indicate that the clinical demands on the surgeon are no less than those observed during conventional placement. The aim of this report was to present a novel technique for the presurgical simulation of the position of computer-assisted, template-based, planned implants immediately before surgery. The presented technique could increase the clinician’s confidence and the safety of the surgical procedures, which allows changes to the original plan if needed. The potential benefits of the present method should be confirmed by randomized clinical studies.
    Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry 11/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Advanced maxillary medication-related osteonecrosis of the jaw can cause extensive hard and soft tissue destruction that results in long-term oroantral fistulae. The surgical treatment of medication-related osteonecrosis of the jaw may relieve acute symptoms and eliminate the signs of inflammation, but the primary and sustained plastic closure of these defects can challenge both the clinician and the patients. Although the use of obturator prostheses for maxillary defects after ablative oncologic surgery is well documented, studies about this treatment for similar medication-related osteonecrosis of the jaw–related defects are missing. This presentation of clinical situations describes the use of obturators as a conservative alternative to repetitive surgery for the rehabilitation of selected maxillary defects with oroantral communications.
    Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry 10/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Statement of problem Dual-polymerized luting composite resin cements would benefit from enhanced irradiance transmitted through a ceramic restoration. A quantification of the amount of transmitted light through translucent zirconia is lacking. Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the amount of light (360 to 540 nm) passing through translucent and conventional zirconia and a glass ceramic with respect to material thickness and different polymerizing modes. Material and methods Six translucent and a conventional zirconia (negative control) and a glass ceramic (positive control) were considered. Ten specimens of each material and thickness (.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 2.5, 3 mm) were fabricated (n=480). Zirconia materials were sintered according to manufacturers’ instructions. The irradiance passing the different ceramics and thicknesses was measured with a violet-blue LED polymerizing unit in 3 polymerizing modes (plasma, high, and standard power mode) with a USB4000 Spectrometer. The polymerizing unit was placed directly on the specimen’s surface. Data were analyzed with one and multivariate analysis and the Pearson correlation analysis (α=.05). Results In all materials, the translucency and its rate decreased exponentially according to the specimen thickness. The highest influence on the measured irradiance passing through translucent zirconia was exerted by ceramic thickness (P<.05, partial eta squared [ηP²]=.998), closely followed by polymerizing mode (ηP²=.973), while the effect of the material (P=.03, ηP²=.06) and mean grain size (P=.029, ηP²=.027) was significant but low. Conclusions Zirconia was less translucent than the glass ceramic, but the translucency decreased more slowly with material thickness, thus approaching the translucency of glass ceramics at a specimen thicknesses of 2.5 to 3 mm.
    Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry 10/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Statement of the problem Polyvinyl siloxane materials of various consistencies have been tested to reduce defects commonly associated with different definitive impression techniques. Purpose The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the number of visible defects within the surface of a new 3-phase, 2-step impression injection technique with the number found in the monophase and in the conventional 2-phase, 1-step and 2-phase, 2-step impression techniques. Material and methods Two complete crown abutment preparations were impressed 10 times for each of these 4 techniques, which gave 20 abutment impressions for each group. The 3-phase, 2-step impression--injection technique included extra-light--body impression material added for the impression and injected after reinsertion. After the removal of all of these impressions, an examiner counted the number of open voids and bubble-like enclosed voids visible to the naked eye at a working distance of approximately 150 mm. Only the defects in the area of the prepared abutments were included in the assessment. Results The frequency of defects ranged from 100% of the impressions in the monophase group to 5% with the new 3-phase, 2-step impression injection technique. No statistical differences were seen between the two 2-phase (1-step and 2-step) impression techniques, although there were numerically fewer impressions with defects with 2 steps (45%) than with 1 step (55%). The 3-phase, 2-step impression injection technique had the greatest accuracy, with fewer specimens with defects (5%) than with either of the 2-phase techniques, although these differences did not reach statistical significance. Conclusions The 3-phase, 2-step impression injection technique provides improved defect-free reproduction of detail, showing fewer defects than other impression techniques.
    Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry 10/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Statement of problem Previous implant torque evaluation did not determine if the target value fell within a confidence interval for the population mean of the test groups, disallowing determination of wheter a specific type of wrench met a standardized goal value. Purpose The purpose of this study was to measure both the accuracy and precision of 2 different configurations (spring style and peak break) of as-received implant torque wrenches and compare the measured values to manufacturer-stated values. Material and methods Ten wrenches from 4 manufacturers, representing a variety of torque-limiting mechanisms and specificity of use (with either a specific brand or universally with any brand of implant product). Drivers were placed into the wrench, and tightening torque was applied to reach predetermined values using a NIST-calibrated digital torque wrench. Five replications of measurement were made for each wrench and averaged to provide a single value from that instrument. The target torque value for each wrench brand was compared to the 95% confidence interval for the true population mean of measured values to see if it fell within the measured range. Results Only 1 wrench brand (Nobel Biocare) demonstrated the target torque value falling within the 95% confidence interval for the true population mean. For others, the targeted torque value fell above the 95% confidence interval (Straumann and Imtec) or below (Salvin Torq). Conclusions Neither type of torque-limiting mechanism nor designation of a wrench to be used as a dedicated brand-only product or to be used as a universal product on many brands affected the ability of a wrench to deliver torque values where the true population mean included the target torque level.
    Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry 10/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The difficulty of evaluating esthetics in an unbiased way may be overcome by using automated software applications.
    Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry 09/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Conventional radiographic techniques are insufficient for detecting caries under fixed restorations or for acquiring clear images of the disease. Advanced radiographic techniques such as cone beam computerized tomography may be a solution.
    Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry 09/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: One of the most important factors in determining the clinical outcomes of fixed dental prostheses is the gap between the fixed dental prosthesis and the abutment. However, reports that investigated these gaps in the context of fixed dental prostheses fabricated with new technologies are few.
    Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry 09/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Statement of problem Intraoral scanners may use proprietary acquisition and manufacturing processes. However, limited information is available regarding their accuracy, their precision, and the influence that refraction or coating may have on their output. Purpose The purpose of the study was to evaluate the scanning accuracy and precision of 4 intraoral scanners and to assess the influence of different test materials and coating thicknesses. Material and methods Models were fabricated in 3 materials (polymethyl methacrylate [Telio CAD], titanium, and zirconia) and reference scanned with an industrial optical scanner. The models were scanned with intraoral scanners (3M Lava COS, Cerec AC/Bluecam, E4D, and iTero). A thick layer of coating was applied and scanned (3M Lava COS). Further evaluation on a gypsum cast was undertaken for the E4D system. Data were evaluated by using 3-dimensional analysis with “3D compare” software commands (3D compare analysis) regarding standard, mean, and maximum deviations, with subsequent statistical analysis. Results The 3M Lava COS, Cerec AC/Bluecam, and iTero generally displayed similar results regarding deviations. Maximum deviations, however, increased by several factors for the noncoating scanners (iTero and E4D). Statistical significance was found regarding material properties for noncoating scanners (P<.05). iTero displayed consistent material-specific, localized errors on the translucent material (Telio CAD). E4D showed the largest deviations. Scans of the gypsum cast displayed specific localized areas with greater deviations. Excessive coating was nonsignificant. Conclusions Significant differences were found between the coating and noncoating scanners, and specific scanning errors for the system with parallel confocal microscopy were found for certain model materials. Specific areas of sizable deviations for the system with laser triangulation technology can be explained by the scanner design and noncoating technology. Excessive coating had no negative effect.
    Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry 08/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Statement of problem The ability of dental technician students to match tooth shade with the Vita 3D-Master shade guide and Toothguide Training Box has not been investigated. Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the shade-matching ability of dental technician students and graduate dentists using the Vita 3D-Master shade guide. Material and methods Twenty-nine dental technician students (DTS group) and 30 graduate dentists (GD group) participated in this study. The Toothguide Training Box (TTB) was used to train the participants and test their shade-matching abilities. Shade-matching ability was evaluated with 3 exercises and a final test, all of which are components of the TTB. The number of mistakes for each participant for value (L), chroma (c), and hue (h) were recorded during the exercises and the final test, and the mistake ratios were calculated. Color difference (ΔE) values for each shade were calculated from the L*, a*, and b* values of the Vita 3D-Master shade guide for each participant in both groups. The Mann-Whitney U test was used to determine statistically significant differences between the L, c, and h mistake ratios of the 2 groups, and the Student t test was used to determine statistically significant differences between the final test scores and the ΔE values of the groups (α=.05). Results The mistake ratio for L in the GD group was significantly higher than that of the DTS group (P<.05), whereas the mistake ratio for h in the DTS group was higher (P<.001). No significant differences were observed between the groups regarding the mistake ratios for c (P>.05). With regard to the final test scores and the ΔE values, no significant differences were found between the groups (P<.001), and the DTS group received higher scores than the GD group (912 and 851). The mean ΔE values for the DTS and GD groups were 1.72 and 2.92. Conclusions DTSs made more mistakes in the h parameter than GDs, and GDs made more mistakes in the L parameter than DTSs. With regard to the final test scores and the ΔE values, DTSs were more successful in shade matching than GDs.
    Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry 08/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Statement of problem A silicone prosthesis used to rehabilitate defects caused by cancer does not usually protect the underlying skin from ultraviolet light. Additives to the maxillofacial material may add ultraviolet protection. Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the degree of ultraviolet protection after incorporating varying concentrations of nano-oxides in Cosmesil M511 medical grade silicone elastomer. Material and methods Nanosized oxides of Zn and Ti were added in various concentrations (0.5%, 1.0%, 1.5%, 2.0%, and 2.5% by weight) to a silicone elastomer. Cosmesil M511 silicone without nano-oxides served as the control group for 11 experimental groups. All specimens were subjected to ultraviolet radiation with ultraviolet A (>315-400 nm) and ultraviolet B (>280-315 nm), and the percentage transmission was measured with an ultraviolet spectrophotometer. The ultraviolet protection factor was calculated. The Mann-Whitney U test was used to evaluate which of the groups differed significantly (α=.05). The Wilcoxon signed rank test was used to test the difference in values obtained for both ultraviolet ranges. Results Spectrophotometric analysis indicated that the percentage-of-transmission values decreased for both the nano-oxide groups for the ultraviolet A and B ranges (P<.05) compared with the control group. The ultraviolet protection factor values increased considerably as the percentage concentration of nano-oxides was increased for both ultraviolet ranges (P<.05). Conclusions Compared with Ti nano-oxides (2% to 2.5%), Zn nano-oxides in lesser concentrations provided more significant and consistent ultraviolet protection in Cosmesil M511 elastomer.
    Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry 08/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Regardless of the type of indirect restoration being fabricated, optimizing fit at cementation is a challenge. Several disclosing agents have been recommended to identify intaglio surface contacts that may result in incomplete seating and poorly adapted margins. The International Organization for Standardization has established a standard of 25 μm for the maximum film thickness for water-based cements. To accurately predict the clinical behavior of a luting cement, the disclosing agents themselves should have a film thickness no greater than 25 μm.
    Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry 07/2014;
  • Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry 07/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The selective laser melting technique is attracting interest in prosthetic dentistry. The marginal fit is a key criterion for fixed restorations.
    Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry 07/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Statement of problem The mechanical properties of polyetheretherketone (PEEK) make it an ideal material for fixed dental prostheses; however, insufficient information is available about the cementation of these restorations. Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the retention strength of differently pretreated and conditioned PEEK crowns luted to dental abutments. Material and methods Human teeth were prepared in a standardized manner, and PEEK crowns were milled (N=160, n=10 per group) and conditioned as follows: airborne-particle abrasion, sulfuric etching, piranha etching, and no conditioning. These groups were divided into adhesive systems: visio.link, Signum PEEK Bond, Ambarino P60, and no adhesive and luted to dentin abutments. After water storage (60 days) and thermocycling (5000 cycles, 5°C/55°C), the retention strength of the crowns was determined with a pull-off test, and failure types were classified. The data were analyzed with the Kruskal-Wallis, 1-way ANOVA, and χ2 test (α=.05). Results Crowns that were unconditioned and piranha etched and/or adhesively untreated or pretreated with Ambarino P60 had the lowest retention strength. The highest values were found for the airborne-particle abrasion and sulfuric etched groups and/or crowns adhesively pretreated with Signum PEEK Bond and visio.link. Composite resin cement that remained on dentin was observed more frequently for unconditioned groups in combination with Ambarino P60 and no adhesive pretreatment. Mixed failure types were found more frequently in the airborne-particle abrasion group in combination with visio.link, Signum PEEK Bond, and no adhesive pretreatment, in the sulfuric acid etched group combined with Ambarino P60 and no adhesive pretreatment, and after the piranha acid pretreatment in combination with visio.link or Signum PEEK Bond. Conclusions The adhesion of the tested PEEK crowns to dentin was satisfactory after treatment with airborne-particle abrasion or etching with sulfuric acid and/or when additional adhesive systems such as visio.link or Signum PEEK Bond were used.
    Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry 07/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Milling is a central and important aspect of computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) technology. High milling accuracy reduces the time needed to adapt the workpiece and provides restorations with better longevity and esthetic appeal. The influence of different milling processes on the accuracy of milled restorations has not yet been reviewed.
    Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry 06/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: STATEMENT OF PROBLEM: Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) can be used as a framework material for fixed dental prostheses. However, information about the durable bond to veneering resins is still scarce. PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of chemical treatments of PEEK on tensile bond strength (TBS) to veneering resins with special emphasis on surface free energy (SFE) and surface roughness (SR). MATERIAL AND METHODS: Seven-hundred fifty PEEK specimens were fabricated and divided into the following 3 pretreatment groups (n=250/group): etching with sulfuric acid for 60 seconds, etching with piranha acid for 30 seconds, and an unetched control. After pretreatment, SFE was determined by using contact angle measurements and SR with a profilometer (n=10/group). The topography of pretreated PEEK surfaces was examined with scanning electron microscopy. Remaining specimens (n=240 per group) were conditioned with visio.link or Signum PEEK Bond, or were left untreated as the control group. Half of each group was veneered with Sinfony or VITA VM LC (n=40/group), and TBS was measured after storage in distilled water at 37°C for either 24 hours or 60 days. Data were analyzed by 4-way and 1-way ANOVA followed by the Scheffé post hoc test and chi-square test (α=.05). RESULTS: PEEK specimens etched with sulfuric acid resulted in higher SFE and SR than specimens without pretreatment or etching with piranha acid. Etching with sulfuric acid or piranha acid led to no general recommendations with respect to TBS. Conditioning with visio.link or Signum PEEK Bond significantly increased the TBS (P<.001). PEEK veneered with Sinfony showed significantly higher TBS values than those veneered with VITA VM LC (P<.001). CONCLUSIONS: Sufficient TBS for bonding to veneering resin can only be achieved when additional adhesive materials were applied.
    Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry 06/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Little is known about the clinical performance of fixed dental prostheses that rigidly connect adhesive retainers and crowns.
    Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry 06/2014;