Journal of Neurology Neurosurgery & Psychiatry (J NEUROL NEUROSUR PS)

Publisher: British Medical Association, BMJ Publishing Group

Journal description

Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery, & Psychiatry (JNNP) publishes important papers covering the whole field of clinical neurological practice. Emphasis is given to common disorders such as cerebrovascular disease, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, peripheral neuropathy, epilepsy, subarachnoid haemorrhage, including papers concerning pathogenesis and treatment. Only high priority articles are published in the journal.

Current impact factor: 5.58

Impact Factor Rankings

2015 Impact Factor Available summer 2015
2013 / 2014 Impact Factor 5.58
2012 Impact Factor 4.924
2011 Impact Factor 4.764
2010 Impact Factor 4.791
2009 Impact Factor 4.869
2008 Impact Factor 4.622
2007 Impact Factor 3.857
2006 Impact Factor 3.63
2005 Impact Factor 3.122
2004 Impact Factor 3.11
2003 Impact Factor 3.035
2002 Impact Factor 2.939
2001 Impact Factor 3.024
2000 Impact Factor 2.846
1999 Impact Factor 2.735
1998 Impact Factor 2.938
1997 Impact Factor 3.041
1996 Impact Factor 2.93
1995 Impact Factor 2.504
1994 Impact Factor 2.534
1993 Impact Factor 2.261
1992 Impact Factor 2.696

Impact factor over time

Impact factor
Year

Additional details

5-year impact 5.14
Cited half-life 0.00
Immediacy index 1.69
Eigenfactor 0.04
Article influence 1.82
Website Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & Psychiatry website
Other titles Journal of neurology, neurosurgery and psychiatry, Journal of neurology, neurosurgery & psychiatry
ISSN 0022-3050
OCLC 1695236
Material type Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Journal / Magazine / Newspaper, Internet Resource

Publisher details

BMJ Publishing Group

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • On author's personal website, institutional website or institutional repository
    • Publisher copyright and source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • If funding agency rules apply, authors may post articles in PubMed Central and mirror sites, website, institutional website or institutional repository
    • On PubMed Central after 12 months embargo, or as required by funding agency
    • Publisher last contacted on 08/12/2014
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: A 28-year-old right-handed man presented with medically intractable focal reflex epilepsy. He previously underwent resection of a right parietal lobe cortical dysplasia. Postoperatively, he developed focal reflex epilepsy triggered by motor activation of the left lower extremity. These were refractory to multiple antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) and vagal nerve stimulation therapy (VNS), and prevented standing and walking. Clinical examination showed mild left hemiparesis and left lower extremity myoclonic seizures triggered by motor activation and standing (see online supplementary video 1). Scalp EEG showed focal seizure discharges consisting of rhythmic midline central sharp waves. Brain MRI showed postoperative signal hyperintensity in the region of the prior resection (figure 1A). Subtraction ictal single-photon emission CT coregistered to MRI (SISCOM) demonstrated ictal hyperperfusion in the near prior resection cavity in leg motor area (figure 1B).
    Journal of Neurology Neurosurgery & Psychiatry 02/2015; DOI:10.1136/jnnp-2014-309944
  • Journal of Neurology Neurosurgery & Psychiatry 02/2015; DOI:10.1136/jnnp-2014-309645
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The ability to predict costs following a traumatic brain injury (TBI) would assist in planning treatment and support services by healthcare providers, insurers and other agencies. The objective of the current study was to develop predictive models of hospital, medical, paramedical, and long-term care (LTC) costs for the first 10 years following a TBI. The sample comprised 798 participants with TBI, the majority of whom were male and aged between 15 and 34 at time of injury. Costing information was obtained for hospital, medical, paramedical, and LTC costs up to 10 years postinjury. Demographic and injury-severity variables were collected at the time of admission to the rehabilitation hospital. Duration of PTA was the most important single predictor for each cost type. The final models predicted 44% of hospital costs, 26% of medical costs, 23% of paramedical costs, and 34% of LTC costs. Greater costs were incurred, depending on cost type, for individuals with longer PTA duration, obtaining a limb or chest injury, a lower GCS score, older age at injury, not being married or defacto prior to injury, living in metropolitan areas, and those reporting premorbid excessive or problem alcohol use. This study has provided a comprehensive analysis of factors predicting various types of costs following TBI, with the combination of injury-related and demographic variables predicting 23-44% of costs. PTA duration was the strongest predictor across all cost categories. These factors may be used for the planning and case management of individuals following TBI. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.
    Journal of Neurology Neurosurgery & Psychiatry 02/2015; DOI:10.1136/jnnp-2014-309479
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Early diagnosis of cognitive impairment allows timely intervention with pharmacological and non-pharmacological measures. However, current cognitive evaluation tools do not cater for multilingual populations. To develop and validate a visual-based cognitive evaluation tool, the Visual Cognitive Assessment Test (VCAT), which can be administered to multilingual populations without the need for translation or adaptation. We designed a battery of tests to evaluate the domains of memory, executive function, visuospatial function, language and attention. Pilot testing of individual test items, followed by test refinement and development of a field version was performed. We subsequently validated VCAT for the diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and mild Alzheimer's disease (AD). Diagnostic performance was assessed by the area under the curve (AUC), sensitivity (Se) and specificity (Sp). VCAT was validated in a sample of 206 participants. The sample comprised 53.9% males; mean age (SD) was 67.8 (8.86) years; mean years of education was 10.5(6.0). AUC of VCAT for detection of cognitive impairment was found to be 93.3 (95% CI 90.1 to 96.4). Also, the Se and Sp of VCAT for the diagnosis of cognitive impairment (MCI and mild AD) were 85.6% and 81.1%, respectively. VCAT's diagnostic Se and Sp comparable to those of the Montreal Cognitive Assessment in the same cohort. Mean time-to-complete VCAT was 15.7±7.3 min. The VCAT has good Se and Sp for the diagnosis of MCI and mild AD. The visual-based test paradigm allows easy application to multilingual populations without the need for translation or adaptation. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.
    Journal of Neurology Neurosurgery & Psychiatry 02/2015; DOI:10.1136/jnnp-2014-309647
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Prospective studies on lipids and risk of Parkinson's disease (PD) in Asian populations are sparse. This study prospectively examined the associations between dietary cholesterol and major fatty acids, and risk of PD among the Chinese in Singapore. This study used data from the Singapore Chinese Health Study, a population-based prospective cohort of 63 257 men and women aged 45-74 years in Singapore enrolled in 1993-1998. Dietary intakes of cholesterol and fatty acids were derived from a validated semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire and the Singapore Food Composition Table. Incident PD cases were identified either through follow-up interviews or record linkage analysis with hospital discharge and PD outpatient registries. After an average of 14.6 years, 218 men and 193 women in the cohort developed PD. Dietary cholesterol was associated with statistically significantly lower risk of PD in a dose-dependent manner among men after adjustment for established risk factors for PD and intakes of major fatty acids. Compared to the lowest quartile, HR (95% CI) for the highest quartile was 0.53 (95% CI 0.33 to 0.84) (P for trend=0.006). Among women, dietary monounsaturated fatty acid was inversely associated with PD risk (P for trend=0.033). Compared to the lowest quartile, HR for the highest quartile was 0.44 (95% CI 0.22 to 0.88). There was no statistically significant association between dietary saturated, n-3 and n-6 fatty acids and PD risk. Higher intakes of cholesterol and monounsaturated fatty acids may reduce risk of PD in men and women, respectively. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.
    Journal of Neurology Neurosurgery & Psychiatry 02/2015; DOI:10.1136/jnnp-2014-310065
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In this prospective case series, we aimed to characterise the temporal evolution of functional and structural measures in the afferent visual pathway of patients with acute optic neuritis (ON). Fifty patients with ON were followed over 12 months. Testing with spectral-domain optical coherence tomography, Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution (LogMAR) visual acuity and Humphrey perimetry central 30-2 threshold (SITA strategy) was performed at baseline, 3, 6 and 12 months after symptom onset. The main outcome measure was mean peripapillary retinal nerve fibre layer (RNFL) thickness in ON eyes. Secondary outcomes included mean ganglion cell layer (GCL) thickness, LogMAR visual acuity, and Humphrey perimetry measured visual field mean deviation (VFMD). Survival analyses were performed to Kaplan-Meier curves and variables in the models were tested using the log-rank test. Over 12 months, RNFL and GCL values progressively declined in ON eyes, and intereye differences were significantly different across all time points. When functional recovery was defined as a VFMD better than -5.00 dB in ON eyes, the mean recovery time for the entire cohort was 3 months (survival was 48%, SE=0.09, 95% CI 0.30 to 0.64). There were significant differences in cumulative recovery when comparisons were made between genders: 3 months after symptom onset there was a higher percentage cumulative recovery for female (75%) versus male (25%) patients. Structural and functional measures evolve over time in patients with ON. There may be sex-specific differences in recovery after an acute ON event. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.
    Journal of Neurology Neurosurgery & Psychiatry 02/2015; DOI:10.1136/jnnp-2014-309704
  • Journal of Neurology Neurosurgery & Psychiatry 02/2015; DOI:10.1136/jnnp-2015-310440
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Peripheral nerve ultrasound (US) has emerged as a promising technique for the diagnosis of peripheral nerve disorders. While most experience with US has been reported in the context of nerve entrapment syndromes, the role of US in the diagnosis of peripheral neuropathy (PN) has recently been explored. Distinctive US findings have been reported in patients with hereditary, immune-mediated, infectious and axonal PN; US may add complementary information to neurophysiological studies in the diagnostic work-up of PN. This review describes the characteristic US findings in PN reported to date and a classification of abnormal nerve US patterns in PN is proposed. Closer scrutiny of nerve abnormalities beyond assessment of nerve calibre may allow for more accurate diagnostic classification of PN, as well as contribute to the understanding of the intersection of structure and function in PN. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.
    Journal of Neurology Neurosurgery & Psychiatry 02/2015; DOI:10.1136/jnnp-2014-309599
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Recent advances in understanding amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) have delivered new questions. Disappointingly, the initial enthusiasm for transgenic mouse models of the disease has not been followed by rapid advances in therapy or prevention. Monogenic models may have inadvertently masked the true complexity of the human disease. ALS has evolved into a multisystem disorder, involving a final common pathway accessible via multiple upstream aetiological tributaries. Nonetheless, there is a common clinical core to ALS, as clear today as it was to Charcot and others. We stress the continuing relevance of clinical observations amid the increasing molecular complexity of ALS. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.
    Journal of Neurology Neurosurgery & Psychiatry 02/2015; DOI:10.1136/jnnp-2014-308946
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Vascular cognitive impairment (VCI) is a heterogeneous group of cerebrovascular diseases secondary to large and small vessel disease. We hypothesised that biomarkers obtained early in the disease could identify a homogeneous subpopulation with small vessel disease. We obtained disease markers in 62 patients with VCI that included neurological findings, neuropsychological tests, multimodal MR and cerebrospinal fluid measurements of albumin ratio, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), amyloid-β1-42 and phosphorylated-τ181. Proton MR spectroscopic imaging showed ischaemic white matter and permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) was measured with dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI. We constructed a 10-point Binswanger disease score (BDS) with subjective and objective disease markers. In addition, an objective set of biomarkers was used for an exploratory factor analysis (EFA) to select patients with BD. Patients were followed for an average of 2 years to obtain clinical consensus diagnoses. An initial BDS of 6 or greater was significantly correlated with a final diagnosis of BD (p<0.05; area under the curve (AUC)=0.79). EFA reduced nine objective biomarkers to four factors. The most predictive of BD was the factor containing the inflammatory biomarkers of increased BBB permeability, elevated albumin index and reduced MMP-2 index (factor 2; AUC=0.78). Both measures independently predicted a diagnosis of BD, and combining them improved the diagnostic accuracy. Biomarkers predicted the diagnosis of the BD type of subcortical ischaemic vascular disease. Using pathophysiological biomarkers to select homogeneous groups of patients needs to be tested in targeted treatment trials. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.
    Journal of Neurology Neurosurgery & Psychiatry 01/2015; DOI:10.1136/jnnp-2014-309421
  • Journal of Neurology Neurosurgery & Psychiatry 01/2015; DOI:10.1136/jnnp-2014-309827
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Current evidence suggests that neurocognitive testing has limited practical benefit in distinguishing behavioural-variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). In this meta-analysis of 30 studies, theory of mind (ToM) performances of 784 individuals with bvFTD (n=273) and AD (n=511) were compared with 671 healthy controls. ToM performances of 227 patients with bvFTD and 229 with AD were also compared in studies matched for general cognition. ToM was impaired in both bvFTD (d=1.79) and AD (d=1.15). In bvFTD, patients were particularly impaired in advanced tasks such as recognition of faux pas and sarcasm (d>2.0). In AD, ToM deficits were relatively modest. In studies matched for general cognition, ToM was significantly impaired in bvFTD in comparision to AD (d=1.29), especially for faux pas recognition (d=1.75). ToM dysfunction is a robust and more specific feature of bvFTD. In contrast, ToM deficits are modest compared with level of general cognitive impairment in AD. In both disorders, longer duration of disease and level of general cognitive impairment are related to relatively more severe ToM deficits. Assessment of ToM can be beneficial for early identification of bvFTD.
    Journal of Neurology Neurosurgery & Psychiatry 01/2015; DOI:10.1136/jnnp-2014-309445.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Current evidence suggests that neurocognitive testing has limited practical benefit in distinguishing behavioural-variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). In this meta-analysis of 30 studies, theory of mind (ToM) performances of 784 individuals with bvFTD (n=273) and AD (n=511) were compared with 671 healthy controls. ToM performances of 227 patients with bvFTD and 229 with AD were also compared in studies matched for general cognition. ToM was impaired in both bvFTD (d=1.79) and AD (d=1.15). In bvFTD, patients were particularly impaired in advanced tasks such as recognition of faux pas and sarcasm (d>2.0). In AD, ToM deficits were relatively modest. In studies matched for general cognition, ToM was significantly impaired in bvFTD in comparision to AD (d=1.29), especially for faux pas recognition (d=1.75). ToM dysfunction is a robust and more specific feature of bvFTD. In contrast, ToM deficits are modest compared with level of general cognitive impairment in AD. In both disorders, longer duration of disease and level of general cognitive impairment are related to relatively more severe ToM deficits. Assessment of ToM can be beneficial for early identification of bvFTD. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.
    Journal of Neurology Neurosurgery & Psychiatry 01/2015; DOI:10.1136/jnnp-2014-309445