Journal of Geography (J GEOGR )

Publisher: National Council for Geographic Education; National Council of Geography Teachers (U.S.); American Geographical Society of New York

Description

Journal of Geography is new to Routlege for 2007, and is the journal of the National Council for Geographic Education. The Journal of Geography provides a forum for educators and scholars to present results from teaching and research that advance our understanding and practice of geographic education from pre-Kindergarten through the post-graduate levels. The Journal publishes articles on instructional approaches, the results of research, lesson plans and teaching activities, and reviews of books, maps, computer software and other digital products.

Impact factor 0.87

  • 5-year impact
    0.85
  • Cited half-life
    8.80
  • Immediacy index
    0.13
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
    0.20
  • Website
    Journal of Geography website
  • Other titles
    Journal of geography
  • ISSN
    0022-1341
  • OCLC
    1754604
  • Material type
    Periodical
  • Document type
    Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publications in this journal

  • Journal of Geography 01/2015; 114(1).
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    ABSTRACT: This article describes initiatives implemented in Finland to create an online learning environment for studying geographic information systems (GIS). A development project produced an online GIS tool called PaikkaOppi, aimed at promoting GIS studies and spatial thinking skills in upper secondary schools. The project is reviewed through analysis of its technical and pedagogical backgrounds and a description of how it was established and how the pilot phase has been implemented. The article also presents some of the key insights, notes and findings from the first pilot courses.
    Journal of Geography 01/2015; 114(1).
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    ABSTRACT: Previous research has examined heuristics—simplified decision-making rules-of-thumb—for geospatial reasoning. This study examined at two locations the influence of beliefs about local coastline orientation on estimated directions to local and distant places; estimates were made immediately or after fifteen seconds. This study goes beyond well-known effects of alignment, rotation, and orthogonalization. Although residents at both locations widely assume a north–south coastline with ocean lying to the west, it actually runs east–west at the second location with ocean to the south. This created constant errors from the second location not seen from the first. Response delay had very little effect.
    Journal of Geography 01/2015; 114(1).
  • Journal of Geography 01/2015; 114(1).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The adaptation of geography studies to the European Higher Education Area (EHEA) framework has led to curriculum-content restructuring and new teaching and learning methods. This transformation was used as an opportunity to adjust the students’ skills more fittingly to their future professional needs. The new degree program in geography, land-use planning, and environmental management at the University of Girona (Catalonia, Spain) offers a sequential learning trajectory based on the treatment of geographic information and progressive levels of experience: GIS technician, GIS analyst, and TIS project manager. Technical innovations have been introduced through free and open-source programs as well as collaborative online resources (wikis) that enable students to acquire full autonomy.
    Journal of Geography 12/2014; 113(3).
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    ABSTRACT: This study introduces the Listening to Others’ Voices (LOV) project, an empowering strategy in geography education. This research aims to create a dataset detailing the perspectives of negatively stereotyped countries with respect to how their countries are portrayed in geography textbooks and to investigate the pedagogical effects of the LOV project. Preservice teachers in South Korea selected so-called marginalized countries from world regional geography textbooks at the secondary education level and interviewed an ambassador or similar person. It was found that the interviewees hoped to emphasize positive images, such as economic development and a unique culture. In addition, some issues relevant to the classification of current world regions were explored. The participants indicated that they felt empowered in leading the completion of the project and that they understood that geographic knowledge is a social construct.
    Journal of Geography 11/2014; 113(6).
  • Journal of Geography 11/2014; 113(6).
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    ABSTRACT: There is a need for quality professional development programs and instructional models addressing the needs and challenges of K–12 technology integration in the geography classroom. This study used a mixed-methods design employing surveys and observations to evaluate teacher experiences within a professional development program focused on developing in-service geography teachers’ technological, pedagogical, and content knowledge (TPACK) through content-specific learning tools and resources. Results indicate that instructional scaffolding plays an important role in improving teachers’ ability to integrate technology in pedagogically meaningful ways geared toward enhancing students’ geographic inquiry skills.
    Journal of Geography 11/2014; 113(6).
  • Journal of Geography 11/2014; 113(6).
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    ABSTRACT: The introductory level course Geography of the U.S. and Canada requires students to grasp large amounts of complex material, oftentimes using a lecture-based pedagogical approach. This article outlines two ways that popular music can be successfully used in the geography classroom. First, songs are used to review key concepts and characteristics of each subregion as a way to reinforce course material. Second, students critically analyze place representations in a selected song as a way to synthesize course themes. Excerpts from student work demonstrate that music does assist in helping students connect to and understand geographical concepts.
    Journal of Geography 11/2014; 113(6).
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    ABSTRACT: Knowledge around geospatial technologies and learning remains sparse, inconsistent, and overly anecdotal. Studies are needed that are better structured; more systematic and replicable; attentive to progress and findings in the cognate fields of science, technology, engineering, and math education; and coordinated for multidisciplinary approaches. A proposed agenda is designed to frame the next generation of research in this field, organized around four foci: (1) connections between GST and geospatial thinking; (2) learning GST; (3) curriculum and student learning through GST; and (4) educators’ professional development with GST. Recommendations for advancing this agenda are included. http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/.VA70gEtZJ6A
    Journal of Geography 09/2014; xx(xx):xx-xx.
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    ABSTRACT: The primary objectives of this article are: (1) to conceptualize teacher dispositions related to teaching spatial thinking in geography classrooms; and (2) to propose an exemplar assessment that can be used to prepare teachers who are disposed toward teaching spatial thinking through geography. A detailed description of the construction procedures and potential uses of the assessment are presented with suggestions for future research and applications.
    Journal of Geography 09/2014; 113(5).
  • Journal of Geography 09/2014; 113(5).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: A goal of geography education is fostering geographic literacy for all and building significant expertise for some. How much time and practice do students need to become literate or expert in geography? There is not an answer to this question. Using two concepts from cognitive psychology—the ideas of ten thousand hours and deliberate practice—this article generates Fermi-based estimates of time spent learning geography in K–12 and in higher education. By understanding the roles of time and deliberate practice, educators can make better use of the limited time available to meet the goals of geography education.
    Journal of Geography 09/2014; 113(5).
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    ABSTRACT: Geography textbooks contain chapter or review questions that may engage students in spatial thinking. This research used Jo and Bednarz’s (2009) Taxonomy of Spatial Thinking to evaluate the percentage of spatial thinking questions in four university-level world geography course textbooks. The results from this study were then compared to the findings in Jo and Bednarz’s (2009) analysis of high school geography textbooks. Thirty-five percent of university level textbook questions are related to spatial thinking compared to twenty-four percent in high school geography textbooks. The results provide information useful to stakeholders, such as teachers, administrators, and textbook writers and may help these stakeholders to consciously incorporate the three components of spatial thinking as defined by the National Research Council (2006). A simplified taxonomy for identifying spatial-thinking concepts in textbook review questions is also suggested.
    Journal of Geography 09/2014; 113(5).
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    ABSTRACT: While the use of media permeates geographic research and pedagogic practice, the underlying literacies that link geography and media remain uncharted. This article argues that geographic media literacy incorporates visual literacy, information technology literacy, information literacy, and media literacy. Geographic media literacy is the ability to locate, evaluate, effectively use, and produce geographic information. It is associated with analysis and expression, understanding and praxis. In an era where information increasingly comes from media sources and technologies saturate everyday life, media and media-related technologies have become central to geographic literacy.
    Journal of Geography 03/2014; 113(2).
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    ABSTRACT: In this media-saturated society, students need to think more critically about the media they encounter and that they are producing. Through filmmaking, students can link geographic theory and the real world, bridging the distance from readings/lectures/ discussions to the geography on the ground, making the abstract concrete. But constructing films also enhances students' understanding of the communications they consume and the communications they construct (films, television, podcasts, YouTube, etc.). In this article, a student and instructor discuss the making of short films or videos in geography classes and how it can enhance both geographic education and media literacy.
    Journal of Geography 03/2014;