Journal of Clinical Investigation (J CLIN INVEST )

Publisher: American Society for Clinical Investigation, American Society for Clinical Investigation

Description

The Journal of Clinical Investigation has a respected history as a vital publication for the physician and scientist alike. Since 1924, the JCI has published research that examines the basic science behind clinical presentation. The JCI continues to offer expanded commentary on published articles and series focused on critical topics in emerging areas of biomedicine.

  • Impact factor
    12.81
    Show impact factor history
     
    Impact factor
  • 5-year impact
    14.69
  • Cited half-life
    9.70
  • Immediacy index
    2.59
  • Eigenfactor
    0.20
  • Article influence
    6.43
  • Website
    Journal of Clinical Investigation website
  • ISSN
    0021-9738
  • OCLC
    55055897
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

American Society for Clinical Investigation

  • Pre-print
    • Author cannot archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Personal websites, institutional and funding-body repositories
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Please use publisher PDF
    • Cannot appear before publication
  • Classification
    ‚Äč blue

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Patient responses to placebo and sham effects are a major obstacle to the development of therapies for brain disorders, including Parkinson's disease (PD). Here, we used functional brain imaging and network analysis to study the circuitry underlying placebo effects in PD subjects randomized to sham surgery as part of a double-blind gene therapy trial. Metabolic imaging was performed prior to randomization, then again at 6 and 12 months after sham surgery. In this cohort, the sham response was associated with the expression of a distinct cerebello-limbic circuit. The expression of this network increased consistently in patients blinded to treatment and correlated with independent clinical ratings. Once patients were unblinded, network expression declined toward baseline levels. Analogous network alterations were not seen with open-label levodopa treatment or during disease progression. Furthermore, sham outcomes in blinded patients correlated with baseline network expression, suggesting the potential use of this quantitative measure to identify "sham-susceptible" subjects before randomization. Indeed, Monte Carlo simulations revealed that a priori exclusion of such individuals substantially lowers the number of randomized participants needed to demonstrate treatment efficacy. Individualized subject selection based on a predetermined network criterion may therefore limit the need for sham interventions in future clinical trials.
    Journal of Clinical Investigation 07/2014; 124(8):3656-3666.

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