International Journal of Psychology (INT J PSYCHOL )

Publisher: International Union of Psychological Science, Taylor & Francis

Description

The International Journal of Psychology is the journal of the International Union of Psychological Science (IUPsyS) and is edited by the IUPsyS. Its purpose is to circulate scientific information within and among subdisciplines of psychology and to foster the development of psychological science around the world. The main part of each issue is devoted to empirical and theoretical papers in various fields of scientific psychology. Fields covered include general psychology (perception, learning, cognitive processes, language etc.), neuropsychology, developmental psychology, as well as social, biological, and cross-cultural psychology. The journal emphasises basic research and theory rather than technical and applied problems. With the aim of overcoming local limitations in psychology, the Journal is also devoted to international discussions of theories and methods on which psychologists from various countries and regions may differ. Many of IJP's issues include a second section, the International Platform for Psychologists, which provides an opportunity to exchange news and opinions on psychology as an academic and applied profession. This section also contains information about the IUPsyS, about major international meetings, and about the activities of the National Psychological Societies. Finally it offers an opportunity to express opinions and to discuss internationally significant psychological issues. There is now a new United Nations section within the International Platform for Psychologists. The Journal occasionally publishes a special issue, guest edited by specialists, devoted to a single topic.

  • Impact factor
    0.40
  • 5-year impact
    1.10
  • Cited half-life
    0.00
  • Immediacy index
    0.07
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
    0.41
  • Website
    International Journal of Psychology website
  • Other titles
    International journal of psychology (Online), Journal international de psychologie
  • ISSN
    0020-7594
  • OCLC
    49613747
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Taylor & Francis

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author cannot archive a post-print version
  • Restrictions
    • 12 month embargo for STM, Behavioural Science and Public Health Journals
    • 18 month embargo for SSH journals
  • Conditions
    • Some individual journals may have policies prohibiting pre-print archiving
    • Pre-print on authors own website, Institutional or Subject Repository
    • Post-print on authors own website, Institutional or Subject Repository
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • On a non-profit server
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set statements to accompany deposits (see policy)
    • Publisher will deposit to PMC on behalf of NIH authors.
    • STM: Science, Technology and Medicine
    • SSH: Social Science and Humanities
    • 'Taylor & Francis (Psychology Press)' is an imprint of 'Taylor & Francis'
  • Classification
    ​ yellow

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The present study identified psychological well-being profiles in a sample of Australian university students (N = 207, Mean age = 30.16 years; SD = 11.90). Respondents completed two measures: Ryff’s (1989) Psychological Well-Being (PWB) scale and Lovinbond and Lovinbond’s (2002) Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scales-21 (DASS-21) assessing their levels of PWB and depression. Latent profile analysis was applied to six indices of positive functioning derived from PWB scale: self-acceptance, purpose in life, environmental mastery, positive relations with others, personal growth, and autonomy. An optimal 5-profile solution, reflecting significant incremental shifts from very low to very high PWB, was interpreted. As predicted, profile membership distinguished participants on depression. Importantly, profiles indicating moderate to very high PWB, particularly with the presence of above average autonomy, reported significantly lower levels of depression. Our results suggest prevention of, and treatment efficacy for, mental health problems may be improved by incorporating strategies that address positive functioning attributes, particularly associated with a sense of autonomy.
    International Journal of Psychology 07/2014; 49(4):288-294.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This study investigates the prevalence and predictors of mobbing in the academic world. It examines the effect of sex, job position, job condition, and discrimination experiences on 24 mobbing behaviours and three patterns of mobbing strategies, namely, attacking the victim’s (a) social communication and integration, (b) personal integrity, and (c) occupational or professional capabilities. Data was gathered from a randomized sample of N=639 university academics, administrators, and officials. 24 selected items of the Leymanns Inventory of Psychological Terrorization were factor analysed to identify mobbing patterns. A set of ANOVA and multiple regressions was calculated to identify predictors. Results showed that job position and job condition explained significant differences in the experience of mobbing, whereas no significant effects emerged from analyses defining sex as a predictor. Findings also revealed that discrimination due to victims’ job achievements, aging, political beliefs and professional envy accounted for 52% of the variance in attacks to victims’ social communication and integration. Discrimination due to victims’ education and political beliefs accounted for 29% of the variance in attacks to victims’ personal integrity. Finally, discrimination due to victims’ education and religious beliefs accounted for 29% of the variance in attacks to victims’ occupational and professional capabilities. Results are discussed in the light of Heinz Leymanns theory of mobbing, considering mobbing prevention, early management interventions and vocational rehabilitation.
    International Journal of Psychology 07/2012; 47(Supplement 1):pp. 720-720.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This study was aimed to provide initial evidence for factorial validity, reliability, time invariance and cross-lagged relations for the Proactive Coping Inventory (PCI Spanish). German and English versions of the PCI were translated and adapted into Spanish at The Freie Universität Berlin, Germany. Data were collected from a longitudinal sample of Costa Ricans (T1, n=902/T2, n=535). Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was used to assess the hypothesised structure of 4 dimensions, 7 factors, and 55 items. SPSS-CFA yielded a 7-factor model, with eigenvalues greater than 1.00, quite consistent with theoretical assignment of items to scales. Structural equation model implemented (SEM) with LISREL provided consistent evidence for a 4-dimensional structure that clusters 7 scales, and 55 items. Analyses also revealed that the 4-dimensional structure was invariant across time. Correlations were consistent with hypothesised relations between the PCI Spanish and several external scales, namely: The Brief COPE, Personality Trait Scales, Cognitive Appraisal Scales, and The PANAS. Cross-lagged panel (SEM-LISREL) revealed significant and positive cross-lagged effects between proactive coping and goal oriented coping (reflective, preventive, and strategic planning). It was also found, that early augments in proactive coping were related to later reductions in avoidance coping. Conversely, initial increases in support-oriented coping were linked to later augments in avoidance coping. Theoretical advances will be discussed, and recommendations for further refinements will be given.
    International Journal of Psychology 07/2012; 47(Supplement 1):pp. 5-6.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The Proactive Coping Theory distinguishes four perspectives of coping in terms of time and uncertainty, namely, reactive coping, anticipatory coping, preventive coping, and proactive coping. Specifically, this study was aimed to evaluate the unidimensionality of a brief version of The Proactive Coping Scale within and across six cultures. Psychometric characteristics of the 8-item version scale were examined among a sample of N = 2,701 participants (35% men, 65% women) from five countries and six cultures, namely US Americans, Canadians and Polish Canadians, Costa Ricans, Germans, and Hindus. The central hypothesis was that the 8-item version of the Proactive Coping Scale would be sufficiently reliable and configurally equivalent across the six participating cultures. A set of confirmatory factor analyses implemented with varimax rotations and structural equation modeling (multi-group option) were calculated to investigate structural invariance. Results supported the hypotheses that the reliability of the 8-item version of the Proactive Coping Scale was high within and across cultures. In addition, unidimensionality of the 8-item scale was confirmed in five cultures, except of India, where a two-factorial structure emerged. Findings are discussed in light of recent advances and developments in proactive coping scale research.
    International Journal of Psychology 07/2012; 47(Supplement 1):pp. 34-35.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This study was aimed to provide initial evidence for factorial validity, reliability, time invariance and cross-lagged relations for the Proactive Coping Inventory (PCI Spanish). German and English versions of the PCI were translated and adapted into Spanish at The Freie Universität Berlin, Germany. Data were collected from a longitudinal sample of Costa Ricans (T1, n=902/T2, n=535). Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was used to assess the hypothesised structure of 4 dimensions, 7 factors, and 55 items. SPSS-CFA yielded a 7-factor model, with eigenvalues greater than 1.00, quite consistent with theoretical assignment of items to scales. Structural equation model implemented (SEM) with LISREL provided consistent evidence for a 4-dimensional structure that clusters 7 scales, and 55 items. Analyses also revealed that the 4-dimensional structure was invariant across time. Correlations were consistent with hypothesised relations between the PCI Spanish and several external scales, namely: The Brief COPE, Personality Trait Scales, Cognitive Appraisal Scales, and The PANAS. Cross-lagged panel (SEM-LISREL) revealed significant and positive cross-lagged effects between proactive coping and goal oriented coping (reflective, preventive, and strategic planning). It was also found, that early augments in proactive coping were related to later reductions in avoidance coping. Conversely, initial increases in support-oriented coping were linked to later augments in avoidance coping. Theoretical advances will be discussed, and recommendations for further refinements will be given.
    International Journal of Psychology 07/2012; 47(Supplement 1):pp. 5-6.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Applicants use résumés to demonstrate their knowledge, skills, abilities, and other personal characteristics to recruiters (KSAOs), through education and job-related or non-job-related experiences. But research suggests that the situation for young applicants is especially competitive, since they increasingly enter the labor market with similar educational credentials and limited job-related experience. They may thus use non-job-related experiences, like participation in extracurricular activities (ECAs) during their studies, to demonstrate KSAOs to recruiters, but also to add distinction and value to their credentials. ECAs may therefore become more important in the selection of young applicants. Yet, few studies have undertaken a comprehensive and systematic analysis of the relationships students have with these activities. The purpose of this study was to investigate to what extent students’ involvement in ECAs is due to internal (e.g., passion) or external (e.g., résumé-building) motives, and what factors influence these motives. Results from a study with 197students suggest that students engage in ECAs mainly out of internal motives. But external motives are stronger for activities started closer to entering the labor market, for students active in associative or volunteering activities (as compared to sports or artistic activities), and for students holding leadership positions in their activities. Our results suggest that labor market pressure may be a key component of applicants’ involvement in ECAs. Also, organizations and recruiters may want to consider that students tend not only to engage in ECAs purely out of internal motives, but also to add value to their credentials and match employers’ expectations.
    International Journal of Psychology 01/2012;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Conservation of Resources Theory (COR) assumes that stress occurs when: (i) Individuals’ resources are threatened with loss, (ii) individuals’ resources are actually lost, or (iii) individuals fail to gain sufficient resources following resource investment. Transactional Stress Theory (TST) defines stress as a particular relationship between the person and the environment that is appraised as taxing or exceeding his or her resources and endangering his or her well-being. This study was aimed to evaluate how resource loss and cognitive appraisal predict PTSD, anxiety, depression, and somatisation in survivors of the 2009 Costa Rica earthquake. Data were gathered using questionnaires from a sample of N = 200 survivors two and five months after the disaster. A set of correlations, GLM-multivariate analyses, and hierarchical regressions were calculated to evaluate assumptions. After controlling for demographics and the experience of previous traumata, resource loss accounted for a higher percentage of variance in anxiety, depression and somatisation. As for predicting indicators of PTSD, results showed that cognitive appraisal of loss/damage accounted for higher percentages of variance in re-experience, avoidance, and arousal. Results suggested that resource loss was a better predictor for anxiety, depression, and somatisation, whereas cognitive appraisal of loss/damage was a better predictor for PTSD. The findings are discussed considering differences between TST and COR, and recent advancements in human stress and natural disasters research.
    International Journal of Psychology 01/2012; 47(Supplement 1):pp. 773-773.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Studying broad social identities allows us to understand the relation between an individual and the globalizing, multicultural social world. Identification with all humanity is one of the widest social identities existing. Individuals strongly identifying themselves with people all over the world feel close to them, care for them and perceive them as an in-group. Psychological literature gives evidence for an important role of this very broad social identification in enhancing prosocial behaviors and human rights orientation. Psychologists also found its negative connection with social dominance orientation, ethnocentrism and right-wing authoritarianism. The author searches for psychological background of identification with all humanity, in a current study focusing on possible predicting role of personality traits and empathy. Measures used in the study included Identification With All Humanity Scale by McFarland, The Interpersonal Reactivity Index by Davis and NEO-Five Factor Inventory by Costa & McCrae. 85 subjects were tested, 19-50 years of age, 54% females, 46% males, with different places of residence. The results proved a crucial role of openness to experience and empathy (especially empathic concern and perspective taking) as characteristics which explained together 41% of the variance in the strength of identification with all humanity. They can be thus perceived as a psychological basis to build strong broad social identifications, also with all humanity as in-group. It can be even more important in the face of global problems of humanity, which may need global cooperation to be solved: economic crisis, global warming, degradation of the environment, hunger, thirst and others.
    International Journal of Psychology 01/2012; 47(sup 1):203.
  • International Journal of Psychology 01/2012; 47(1, SI):110.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In South Africa when learners are in Grade 11 near the end of their school life, the new, but also difficult, transition into adult life now begins. This critical period of development brings forth an array of new challenges: exercising free will, being independent, an increased focus of self, and the decision on what path is to be taken after school. With these challenges comes the act of motivation to acquire the particular goals and aspirations of Grade 11 learners. The question posed was therefore what exactly motivates the South African Grade 11 learner, and why are they motivated to set and aspire to certain goals? The study investigated the basic psychological needs of Grade 11 learners at secondary schools in the Western Cape, along with its relation to the identification of the goals and aspirations of these learners. The study was quantitative in nature. Grade 11 learners currently enrolled for the 2012 academic year, attending secondary schools in the Metro North Western Cape Education District, were invited to participate in the study. This study investigated the influence of basic psychological needs on goals and aspiration pursuits. The sample consisted of 264 Grade 11 learners and data was collected through the administration of a questionnaire compiled through the combination of two scales: The Aspiration Index, and the Basic Measure of Psychological Needs Scale. The data was analyzed through regression analysis. The results of the study suggest that the satisfaction of needs was found to be a significant predictor of both intrinsic as well as extrinsic goal pursuits. The findings further provide an understanding of how basic psychological needs influence the identification of goals and aspirations of Grade 11 Learners. Recommendations are provided for further research in the field of adolescent basic psychological needs and its influences on the identification of goals and aspirations.
    International Journal of Psychology 01/2012; 47:313.
  • International Journal of Psychology 01/2012; 47(Special Issue: SI-47):437-438.
  • International Journal of Psychology 01/2012;

Related Journals