Indian psychological review (Indian Psychol Rev )

Publisher: Indian Psychological Society; Agra Psychological Research Cell

Description

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  • 5-year impact
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  • Other titles
    Indian psychological review
  • ISSN
    0019-6215
  • OCLC
    1644511
  • Material type
    Periodical
  • Document type
    Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publications in this journal

  • Indian psychological review 01/2011; 76(2):121-28.
  • Indian psychological review 01/2009; 72(01):55-64.
  • Indian psychological review 01/1990;
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    ABSTRACT: Three hundred and sixty Rickshaw pullers in Varanasi were interviewed for their socio - economic condition with spacial reference to occupation and spacial mobility. Majority of Rickshaw pullers were found to have nominal land and no education. These Rickshaw pullers belong to age group 20-49 years and majority (84%) were satisfied in this job. It was observed that 50% Ricksha pullers were migrant to Varanasi city and there was no significant difference in their occupation and the occupation of the fathers of Rickshaw pullers at their birth place.
    Indian psychological review 01/1990; 35(5-6):40-44.
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    ABSTRACT: Studied the effect of father's occupation, child's birth order, and family type on the creative abilities of 50 female and 50 male 8th graders from government high schools in Ludhiana, India. The Baqer Mehdi Non-verbal Test of Creativity Thinking and a self-designed personal information sheet were used. Ss' creative abilities were found to be independent of all of these demographic factors. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
    Indian psychological review 11/1986;
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    ABSTRACT: Reviews research into correlates of academic achievement (AA). While intelligence plays a major role in AA, several other factors also appear to contribute. Home environment, maternal care, relations between parents, socioeconomic status (SES), parental education, interest, and motivation have been found to be related to AA. Personality factors related to AA include self-concept, neuroticism, psychoticism, and introversion–extraversion. Overall, personality adjustment appears to be related to AA, and value systems also seem to play a role. Thus, AA appears to be an outcome of a large number of determinants interacting with each other. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
    Indian psychological review 06/1986;
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    ABSTRACT: Studied quality of life experienced by 33 railway officers, 31 bank managers, and 31 university teachers by administering to representatives of each group a 21-item questionnaire developed by the present 1st author and A. K. Sharma (1980). All Ss were males (aged 25–40 yrs). Findings indicate that employees of banks, as a group, have a better quality of life than do employees of universities and railways. Bank employees ranked higher than did members of other categories on all measures of satisfaction except education, social relations, and prestige and status. It is suggested that this finding may result from a greater desire for these entities by bank employees than by railway employees or university teachers. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
    Indian psychological review 04/1986;
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    ABSTRACT: Studied differences in scientific creativity in 117 males and 113 females in the middle schools of Raipur and Rajnandgaon districts in India. The test of scientific creativity developed by Shukla (1980), which measures fluency, flexibility, originality, and global scientific creativity, was administered. Results indicate that males and females do not differ significantly in any of the measures of scientific creativity. The mean scores of boys on all measures of scientific creativity as well as on global scientific creativity were consistently, but insignificantly, higher than those of girls. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
    Indian psychological review 04/1986;
  • Indian psychological review 02/1986; 30(1):38-41.
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    ABSTRACT: Examined the relationship between creativity and anxiety in 100 male and 100 female high school students. Ss were administered a verbal test of creative thinking and an anxiety scale. Results indicate a negative relationship between creativity and anxiety; no sex differences in mean scores of creativity and anxiety; and differences between low, average, and high creative Ss in levels of anxiety. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
    Indian psychological review 08/1985;
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    ABSTRACT: Studied the interrelationship among leadership styles, interpersonal need structure, and organizational climate in 19 middle-level executives (aged 31–50 yrs). Ss were administered questionnaires measuring each of these variables. Dimensions of interpersonal need structure like "expressed control" and "wanted control" were found to be positively related and "expressed affection" and "wanted affection" were negatively related with task orientation. Expressed affection and wanted affection were positively related, and wanted control was negatively related with people orientation. Task-oriented Ss used autocratic modes and people-oriented Ss used participative modes of decision making. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
    Indian psychological review 08/1985;
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    ABSTRACT: Investigated the impact of study habits on academic achievement among 76 intellectually backward students in the 8th standard at rural and urban schools in Gujarat, India. Correlation analyses of results on the Study Habits Inventory by B. V. Patel (1974) and terminal examination grades reveal that study habits are an important determinant of school achievement for both boys and girls in rural as well as urban settings. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
    Indian psychological review 04/1985;
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    ABSTRACT: Discusses the concept of locus of control (LOC). Some persons believe that life events are largely a result of their own effort—internal LOC. Others consider that luck, fate, and factors beyond their control determine what happens—external LOC. In the Western world, an internal LOC is generally idealized, while an external LOC is more prevalent and more admired in the East. The Indian view that events are predetermined—an external LOC—does not necessarily imply a refusal to accept the value of purpose or effort. An ideal attitude toward work should incorporate the value of self-effort while accepting an underlying deterministic framework. LOC scales currently used do not measure a philosophically homogeneous concept, and greater conceptual clarification to make such testing more useful for personality development is needed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
    Indian psychological review 12/1984;
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    ABSTRACT: Presents the Hindu view of aging, in which life and death are seen as an inevitable continuum. Death does not have the traumatic connotations for Hindus as it has for Westerners, and the Hindu belief in reincarnation has a tremendous mental health value. The elderly are at the top of the social hierarchy in the Hindu class system, with definite expectations placed on them by society; they are considered to possess maturity and experience with the capability of instructing the young. A gradual withdrawal from economic and social involvements and a move toward social and spiritual devotion are expected of the elderly, and children are expected to provide basic security to their elderly relatives. The structure of Hindu society does not reinforce negative traits in the elderly, and the individual's value is not confined to economic earning power. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
    Indian psychological review 12/1984;
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    ABSTRACT: Studied the effect of self-concept and level of aspiration on the scholastic achievement (SA) of 240 high and low achieving higher secondary students in India in a 2 × 2 × 3 factorial study, with the independent variables being high and low SA; sex; and high, middle, and low socioeconomic status (SES). Analysis of variance (ANOVA) of self-concept and aspiration scores was conducted. Results indicate that high scholastic achievers possess a higher self-concept than do low achievers. SA, sex, and SES independently and simultaneously interacted and affected the Ss' level of aspiration. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
    Indian psychological review 01/1984;
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    ABSTRACT: Presents an overview of Eastern and Western psychotherapies. Western psychotherapies in 4 main categories—psychodynamic therapies, behavior therapies, humanistic therapies, and cognitive-dynamic therapies—are discussed. Eastern psychotherapies are described as embedded in different systems of thought, namely Yoga therapy and Zen Buddhism. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
    Indian psychological review 01/1984;
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    ABSTRACT: Hypothesized that criminals would show a lower home, health, occupational, social, and emotional adjustment level when compared to noncriminals. It was also predicted that criminals' higher Psychoticism, Extraversion, and Neuroticism scores would be inversely related with these adjustment measures. 160 criminal and 100 noncriminal males were administered the Psychoticism, Extraversion, and Neuroticism Inventory and Bell's Adjustment Inventory. Results confirm the hypotheses. (32 ref) (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
    Indian psychological review 11/1981;
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    ABSTRACT: Investigated study habits, personality adjustment, and anxiety level in relation to the academic achievement of 36 scheduled (SC) and 36 nonscheduled caste college students. Poor adjustment and high anxiety level in SC Ss may be responsible for their poor study habits and academic performance. The influence of such social background factors as parental education and home environment on motivation is discussed. (7 ref) (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
    Indian psychological review 11/1981;
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    ABSTRACT: Administered a questionnaire on mother–child interactional techniques in social and personal situations to 25 urban and 25 rural Indian mothers of at least 1 child between the ages of 2 and 5 yrs. The questionnaire posed situations to the mothers and asked how they or their children would react. Results show that rural mothers interacted more with girls than with boys. They felt that girls needed more instruction and discipline than did boys. Urban mothers' interaction was related to each mother's educational level. Mother–child interaction was greater when mothers had more education. Both urban and rural mothers used tactics such as attention diversion, discouragement, scolding, and spanking to discipline their children. (10 ref) (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
    Indian psychological review 02/1981;