The Indian Journal of Pediatrics (Indian J Pediatr )

Publisher: All-India Institute of Medical Sciences. Dept. of Pediatrics, Springer Verlag

Description

A Premier Pediatric Journal in India, established in 1933 by the doyen of Pediatrics arena, the Late Dr. K.C Chaudhuri. A monthly publication published from the Department of Pediatrics, All India Institute Of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India. The Oldest Specialty Journal in India keeping track with the most current trends in the world of Pediatrics.

Impact factor 0.92

  • Hide impact factor history
     
    Impact factor
  • 5-year impact
    0.73
  • Cited half-life
    6.70
  • Immediacy index
    0.15
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
    0.20
  • Website
    Indian Journal of Pediatrics website
  • ISSN
    0019-5456
  • OCLC
    52511246
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Springer Verlag

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Author's pre-print on pre-print servers such as arXiv.org
    • Author's post-print on author's personal website immediately
    • Author's post-print on any open access repository after 12 months after publication
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set phrase to accompany link to published version (see policy)
    • Articles in some journals can be made Open Access on payment of additional charge
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Objective To describe catch-up growth after antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation among children living with human immunodeficiency virus (CLHIV), attending a private clinic in India. Methods This is a retrospective analysis of data of CLHIV attending Prayas clinic, Pune, India. Height and weight z scores (HAZ, WAZ) were calculated using WHO growth charts. Catch-up growth post-ART was assessed using a mixed method model in cases where baseline and at least one subsequent follow-up HAZ/WAZ were available. STATA 12 was used for statistical analysis. Results During 1998 to 2011, 466 children were enrolled (201 girls and 265 boys; median age = 7 y). A total of 302 children were ever started on ART; of which 73 and 76 children were included for analysis for catch up growth in WAZ and HAZ respectively. Median WAZ and HAZ increased from −2.14 to −1.34 (p = 0.007) and −2.42 to −1.94 (p = 0.34), respectively, 3 y post ART. Multivariable analysis using mixed model (adjusted for gender, guardianship, baseline age, baseline WAZ/HAZ, baseline and time varying WHO clinical stage) showed gains in WAZ (coef = 0.2, 95 % CI: −0.06 to 0.46) and HAZ (coef = 0.49, 95 % CI: 0.21 to 0.77) with time on ART. Lower baseline WAZ/HAZ and older age were associated with impaired catch-up growth. Children staying in institutions and with baseline advanced clinical stage showed higher gain in WAZ. Conclusions The prevalence of stunting and underweight was high at ART initiation. Sustained catch-up growth was seen with ART. The study highlights the benefit of early ART in achieving normal growth in CLHIV.
    The Indian Journal of Pediatrics 01/2015;
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    ABSTRACT: Objective To evaluate the presentation, treatment and outcome of testicular tumors in undescended testes (UDT) in boys below 5 y of age. Methods Case records of boys below 5 y of age, diagnosed to have germ cell tumors (GCT) in the UDT were reviewed. Results Seven children in the age range of 05–54 mo (mean 26 mo) were included. While five of these 7 (71 %) presented with abdominal mass [one antenatally detected], 2 (29 %) were detected to have a GCT during orchiopexy. In three of these five with abdominal mass, the alpha-fetoprotein (αFP) was markedly elevated. Two of these three with elevated αFP were endodermal sinus tumors while the third was embryonal carcinoma. The 4th patient with an abdominal mass was diagnosed to have an immature teratoma (IMT) while the patient with antenatally diagnosed mass had a mature cystic teratoma (MT). Both the patients with incidentally detected mass during the orchiopexy had mature teratoma (MT). All the seven children are alive and disease free at last follow-up. Conclusions Though rare, boys with impalpable undescended testes may develop germ cell tumors early in childhood. These can be managed with chemotherapy and resection and have a good disease free outcome.
    The Indian Journal of Pediatrics 01/2015;
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    ABSTRACT: Conventional MRI protocols are an integral part of routine clinical imaging in pediatric patients. The advent of several newer MRI techniques provides crucial insight into the structural integrity and functional aspects of the developing brain, especially with the introduction of 3T MRI systems in clinical practice. The field of pediatric neuroimaging continues to evolve, with greater emphasis on high spatial resolution, faster scan time, as well as a quest for visualization of the functional aspects of the human brain. MR vendors are increasingly focusing on optimizing MR technology to make it suitable for children, in whom as compared to adults the head size is usually smaller and demonstrates inherent neuroanatomical differences relating to brain development. The eventual goal of these advances would be to evolve as potential biomarkers for predicting neurodevelopment outcomes and prognostication, in addition to their utility in routine diagnostic and therapeutic decision-making. Advanced MR techniques like diffusion tensor imaging, functional MRI, MR perfusion, spectroscopy, volumetric imaging and arterial spin labeling add to our understanding of normal brain development and pathophysiology of various neurological disease processes. This review is primarily focused on outlining advanced MR techniques and their current and potential pediatric neuroimaging applications as well as providing a brief overview of advances in hardware and machine design.
    The Indian Journal of Pediatrics 01/2015;
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    ABSTRACT: To study the etiological spectrum of acute liver failure in infants and young children and to identify clinical and biochemical markers for metabolic liver disease (MLD). This study was conducted at Department of Pediatric Hepatology, in a tertiary care specialized centre for liver diseases. All children less than 3 y of age, with liver dysfunction and INR ≥2 were included in the study. They were managed as per the departmental protocol. Included children were divided based on the etiology into 2 groups: MLD and non MLD group. Comparison analysis (MLD vs. non MLD) of the clinical and biochemical parameters was done. There were 30 children under 3 y of age with acute liver failure (ALF) with median age of 12.5 mo. Fifteen children were less than 12 mo. MLD (33 %) and hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) (17 %) together accounted for half of the cases of ALF in children below 3 y of age. The other common etiologies were drug induced liver injury and acute viral hepatitis A. Etiology remained indeterminate in 3 cases (10 %). Comparative analysis of the clinical and biochemical parameters between MLD and non MLD group showed significant difference between the two groups in the median values of age (p = 0.014), bilirubin (p = 0.017), jaundice to encephalopathy (JE) interval (p = 0.039) and blood sugar (p = 0.001). Suggestive family history (OR 3.73, 95 %CI 1.67-8.30), developmental delay (OR 4.4 95 %CI 2.03-9.51), presence of diarrhea/vomiting (OR 3.28, 95 %CI 1.32-8.13) in the history and presence of urinary non glucose reducing substance (NGRS) (OR 15.5, 95 %CI 2.26-106.87) were also significantly associated with MLD group. Only 40 % children survived with native liver. MLD and HLH account for majority of ALF in infants. About 10 % of cases remain indeterminate. Viral hepatitis is more common in young children. Apart from clinical indicators, young age, high bilirubin, synthetic dysfunction, low sugar and NGRS in urine indicate MLD as a cause. Survival with native liver is low.
    The Indian Journal of Pediatrics 01/2015;
  • The Indian Journal of Pediatrics 12/2014;
  • The Indian Journal of Pediatrics 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: This study was undertaken to compare lipid profile of small for gestational age (SGA) and appropriate for gestational age (AGA) neonates. A total of 103 neonates were included; of which 63 were AGA and 40 SGA. Venous blood (2 ml) was obtained 2 h after the previous feed between 8 and 10 am on Day 3 or Day 4 of life and lipid profile was done. In AGA neonates, mean TC (total cholesterol), LDL (low density lipoprotein cholesterol), HDL (high density lipoprotein cholesterol) and triglycerides were 103.92 ± 47.79, 51.70 ± 23.03, 23.35 ± 11.41 and 187.62 ± 144.44 mg/dl respectively. AGA neonates had more TC and LDL than SGA neonates (P < 0.05). There was no significant difference in mean lipid profile between preterm and term neonates. Thus, normal lipid profiles in neonates in the index study are higher than that of the neonates from other parts of the world. The authors recommend further studies in India to outline normal values of lipid profile across various gestations and birth weights.
    The Indian Journal of Pediatrics 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Patency of the ductus arteriosus is required for fetal survival in utero. In infants born prematurely, ductus fails to close and shunt reverses from left to right. Incidence of patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) is inversely proportional to the gestational age. A large PDA (>1.5 mm diameter) with left to right shunt in very low birth weight infants can cause pulmonary edema, congestive heart failure, pulmonary hemorrhage and increase the risk for bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Attempts to prevent or close the duct by pharmacological or surgical methods have not changed the morbidity or the long term outcome. Pharmacological treatment with indomethacin or ibuprofen is successful in 75 to 80 % of infants but its use also exposes these infants to undesirable side effects like gastrointestinal bleeding, perforation and necrotizing enterocolitis. Prophylactic therapy with indomethacin or ibuprofen to prevent PDA has not altered the morbidity or long term outcome. Currently, there is a dilemma as to how to treat, when to treat and whom to treat. Recent literature suggests a trial of conservative management during the first week followed by selective use of anti-inflammatory drugs. Surgical ligation is reserved for infants who fail medical therapy and still remain symptomatic. Spontaneous closure of the PDA has been reported in up to 40-67 % of very low birth weight (VLBW) infants by 7 d. In this review authors discuss these controversies and propose a more rational approach.
    The Indian Journal of Pediatrics 12/2014;
  • The Indian Journal of Pediatrics 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Pediatric cancers are highly curable. The major reasons cited for poor outcome of pediatric cancers in India are delayed diagnosis, increased relapses for similar stage tumors and increased treatment-related toxic death rates. In this commentary, the authors will briefly discuss how the outcome may possibly be improved by reducing relapses with lesser toxicity, with special focus on issues relevant for India.New formulations of the old drugs, with better understanding of pharmacokinetics and dynamics, have been developed to improve delivery and reduce toxicities. Continuous asparagine depletion has been associated with better event-free-survival (EFS) than intermittent depletion and a lower incidence of central nervous system relapse in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Pegylated (PEG) asparaginase has a long half-life, lower risk of allergic reactions and anti-asparginase antibody formation while maintaining efficacy similar to conventional E. Coli asparaginase [1]; this i ...
    The Indian Journal of Pediatrics 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: To the Editor: We would like to discuss on the article entitled “Should all children admitted with community acquired pneumonia have blood cultures taken?” recently published online in Indian Journal of Pediatrics [1]. Lai et al; noted that “both the yield and the impact of blood culture results on the adjustment of empiric antibiotic treatment were very small [1]” and “there was a high contamination rate [1].” The consideration is on the quality of present blood collection for blood culture. The poor collection technique can be the reason for high contamination and low yield. In the setting of Lai et al., the problem of “pre-analytical error” should be systematically assessed and corrected. It should be noted the pre-analytical error is the main reason for poor analytical result and it can be seen at a high rate despite the laboratory being internationally accredited [2]. The problem can be seen in many countries including USA [3]. The new guideline that focuses on the rational use an ...
    The Indian Journal of Pediatrics 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) is the primary mode of respiratory support for spontaneously breathing preterm neonates with respiratory distress. Early use of nCPAP decreases the needs of exogenous surfactant and invasive ventilation [1]. In extremely preterm neonates its use as an alternative to elective intubation and surfactant administration is associated with decreased incidence of death or bronchopulmonary dysplasia (relative risk 0.91, 95 % CI: 0.84 to 0.99) [2]. In moderately preterm and term neonates, nCPAP has been observed to reduce the need of up-transfer from non-tertiary to tertiary care hospitals in high-resource setting [3].Most of the evidence on use of nCPAP in neonates has emerged from high-income countries. However, middle- and low-income countries (MLIC) where most births take place are most likely to benefit from implementation of this cost-effective intervention. nCPAP is now standard of care in most tertiary care hospitals of middle-income cou ...
    The Indian Journal of Pediatrics 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Childhood obesity has become a major global health problem with an alarming escalating trend in the recent years. The World Health Organization perceives this as the most grim public health challenge for the 21st century, not only due to the rapidly increasing prevalence rates among children and adolescents but the tracking seen into adulthood. Current estimates predict that by 2015, children and adolescents will constitute around 15 % of the 1.5 billion obese population; 75 % of them from the developing countries! Unhealthy diet, increasingly sedentary lifestyle and urbanization, have contributed to this situation, particularly in developing countries [1].Coupled with this, the rising worldwide prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in the young highlights the need for the identification and treatment of children and adolescents at risk of progression to T2DM [2]. There is a corresponding surge of metabolic disorders such as abnormal glucose tolerance (or insulin resistance), d ...
    The Indian Journal of Pediatrics 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: To the Editor: The term Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorders Associated with Streptococcal infections (PANDAS) denotes a group of childhood obsessive-compulsive disorders (OCD) and tic disorders (TD) triggered by Group-A Beta Hemolytic Streptococci (GABHS) infection. Its validity as a nosological entity generates controversy. PANDAS have been propounded to result from an autoimmune mediated process, in which anti-streptolysin-O (ASO) antibodies are thought to be involved, affecting the basal ganglia, [1] much along the lines of the pathogenesis of rheumatic chorea. Specific antibodies targeted to the dominant epitope of GABHS (N-acetyl-beta-D-Glucosamine) might influence neuronal signal transduction thus causing alterations in behavior and movement control by inducing calcium-calmodulin dependent protein (CaM) kinase II activity [2]. The autoimmune mediated mechanism is substantiated by the excellent response of children with PANDAS to immunotherapies (plasma exchange and in ...
    The Indian Journal of Pediatrics 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: To the Editor: Heart failure (HF) is a well-recognized clinical syndrome that affects both children and adults in the entire world [1–3]. HF in adults has received considerable attention, with multiple, large randomized trials that have evaluated the etiology and therapy of this condition. In children, however, the epidemiology of heart failure is less well described, more so in our country [4, 5].The study was undertaken at Department of Pediatric Medicine, Medical College Kolkata. All the relevant data was pooled from both inpatients and outpatients with heart failure. The study population was divided into three groups: neonate (0–1 mo), infant (1–12 mo) and >1 y. Cases were analyzed for the etiological profile in each group. Etiological profile was divided into system-based categories. Chi square analysis was utilized to compare the three groups in all categorical variables.Our study population consisted of 390 patients, of which 210 (53.9 %) were ...
    The Indian Journal of Pediatrics 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: To study the temporal pattern of lysosomal storage disorders (LSD) from onset of symptoms to the final diagnosis and to study the type and the frequency of the disease. Retrospective analysis of the case record forms of the patients attending the Genetic Clinic over a period of 12 y (January 2002- December 2013) was undertaken. Only the data of the patients who had confirmatory enzyme analysis or mutation study for LSD was further analysed. The age at onset, suspicion of the illness, first clinical presentation to a tertiary Genetic centre, and the age at the final diagnosis of these confirmed cases was noted. A total of 5,858 patients were referred to the Genetic clinic in this period. The diagnosis of LSD was suspected in 532 patients (9.08 % of all referrals) and it could be confirmed in 119 cases (2.03 % of all referrals). Maximum patients were diagnosed with Gaucher disease (31.93 %) followed by Mucopolysaccharidoses (20.16 %). Mutation analysis was available in 21 patients (17.64 % of the diagnosed cases). The median time interval between onset and suspicion was 6 mo. The median interval between onset and presentation to the authors' Genetic clinic was 12 mo. The median interval between the onset of the disease and its confirmation was 14 mo. The median interval between presentation to the Genetic centre and diagnosis was barely 1 mo. The incidence of LSD at authors' centre was 2.03 %, though it was suspected in 9.08 % of patients. The delay in diagnosis was hugely due to the late suspicion and thereby the late referral to a tertiary centre.
    ISIEM ,, Hyderabad; 12/2014
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    ABSTRACT: Growth is an essential and continuous process in animate objects. Linear growth or height is considered synonymous to growth by most children and their parents. Any disturbance or faltering in height is thus, a frequent cause of concern for the family. The foremost responsibility of the clinician is to detect whether the growth pattern is appropriate or deviant from the normal. A detailed clinical evaluation including accurate anthropometry is essential to suspect and diagnose the underlying cause. The role of more sophisticated investigations is reserved for fewer children who are pathologically short. Treatment is directed as per the primary etiology of short stature. Growth hormone therapy is a highly specific and targeted therapy which should be instituted only under expert consultation.
    The Indian Journal of Pediatrics 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: India is home to the largest child population in the world, with almost 41 % of the total population under 18 y of age. The health and security of the country's children is integral to any vision for its progress and development. Doctors and health care professionals are often the first point of contact for abused and neglected children. They play a key role in detecting child abuse and neglect, provide immediate and longer term care and support to children. Despite being important stakeholders, often physicians have a limited understanding on how to protect these vulnerable groups. There is an urgent need for systematic training for physicians to prevent, detect and respond to cases of child abuse and neglect in the clinical setting. The purpose of the present article is to provide an overview of child abuse and neglect from a medical assessment to a socio-legal perspective in India, in order to ensure a prompt and comprehensive multidisciplinary response to victims of child abuse and neglect. During their busy clinical practice, medical professionals can also use the telephone help line (CHILDLINE telephone 1098) to refer cases of child abuse, thus connecting them to socio-legal services. The physicians should be aware of the new legislation, Protection of Children from Sexual Offences (POCSO) Act, 2012, which requires mandatory reporting of cases of child sexual abuse, failing which they can be penalized. Moreover, doctors and allied medical professionals can help prevent child sexual abuse by delivering the message of personal space and privacy to their young patients and parents.
    The Indian Journal of Pediatrics 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: To assess cognitive function of school-aged, perinatally acquired human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected, antiretroviral therapy (ART) naïve children in Pune. HIV infected ART naïve children (n = 50) between 6 and 12 y attending outpatient clinic were administered the Indian Child Intelligence Test (ICIT) after their clinical evaluation. Age and gender matched HIV uninfected children (n = 50) were enrolled as controls. The test battery included measures of perception of form (Gestalt), concept formation, memory span, learning and remembering, associative memory span, transformation of visual field, quantitative concepts, spatial visualization and visual motor coordination. The information on adaptive behavior was obtained from the care giver and a brief interview with the child using Vineland Social Maturity Scale (VSMS). Mean age of the children was 9.3 y (SD: 1.3) and mean education was 4.3 y (SD: 1.3). The mean CD4 count of HIV infected children was 588 cells/mm(3) (SD: 324.4). There was no significant difference in the overall ICIT scores between HIV infected and uninfected children (p 0.209). The adaptive behavior (VSMS) scores were significantly less in HIV infected children as compared to others (p 0.028). There was no significant difference in the overall cognitive abilities in HIV infected children using ICIT as compared to HIV uninfected children, although significant difference in the adaptive behavior between the two groups was observed. It is important to conduct larger prospective studies using standardized test batteries that are inclusive of multiple cognitive domains sensitive to HIV effects in Indian children.
    The Indian Journal of Pediatrics 11/2014;