Ibm Systems Journal (IBM SYST J )

Publisher: International Business Machines Corporation

Description

The IBM Systems Journal is a quarterly, refereed technical publication, featuring the work of authors from systems and software fields in information science and the computer industry. The papers are written for a technically aware readership in the software and systems professional community worldwide: technical professionals, researchers, and users. Each paper is peer-reviewed for content, currency, and value by recognized experts in the field. The Web version of the journal is free but the printed version has a subscription fee.

  • Impact factor
    1.29
    Show impact factor history
     
    Impact factor
  • 5-year impact
    1.98
  • Cited half-life
    8.60
  • Immediacy index
    0.00
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
    0.38
  • Website
    IBM Systems Journal website
  • Other titles
    IBM systems journal, International business machines systems journal
  • ISSN
    0018-8670
  • OCLC
    1445487
  • Material type
    Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Journal / Magazine / Newspaper, Internet Resource

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We propose to exploit the technology for complex event processing (CEP) embodied in the rule-based engine known as IBM Active Middleware Technology™ and extend it to the development of real-time CEP applications. Specifically, we propose to develop a framework that includes an integrated development environment (IDE) for defining rules, and, given a set of rules, generates code for a CEP application and enables us to determine time bounds on the response of this application to a set of supported events. In particular, the IDE helps determine a time bound for the execution time of the code corresponding to each rule. The calculation of time bounds is based on a set of benchmark measurements to be performed on the target hardware and involves code segments corresponding to basic operations. Although we assume the code generation phase produces Java™ code, the same approach can be applied to any other suitable programming language. In support of a feasibility argument for the proposed approach, we present some preliminary experimental results obtained on a partially implemented tool.
    Ibm Systems Journal 02/2008;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Since the onset of the computer age, customers have been searching for ways to increase systems availability, maximizing the return on their investment and keeping their systems running continuously as much as possible. Traditionally, customers have used a combination of hardware and software architecture and processes in an attempt to address their continuous availability needs. In this paper, we introduce a new approach to provide high availability which leverages technology for both proactive and reactive support, while engaging a trusted support partner to automate services. We show how automated problem reporting reduces problem resolution time, often by sending the problem to a specialist rather than sending a generalist to the problem. We describe how inventory reporting enables proactive support by applying intellectual capital and knowledge to a specific customer configuration. We also describe how the IBM Electronic Service Agent™ can be used as a foundation for providing service automation and enabling a digital relationship that expands the capabilities of the trusted support partner.
    Ibm Systems Journal 02/2008;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The complexity of real-time systems is growing extremely rapidly, as they move from isolated devices to multilevel networked systems. Traditional methodologies for developing and managing these systems are not scaling to meet the requirements of a new generation of distributed applications. While developers of complex real-time applications are looking to service-oriented architecture to address their needs for ease of development and flexibility of integration, current software infrastructures for service-oriented applications do not address the issue of predictable latency for the applications they host. In this paper, we present Pulsar, a resource-control architecture for managing the end-to-end latency of a set of distributed, time-critical applications. The primary entity of Pulsar is called a controller, which regulates an aspect of resource allocation or scheduling policy. Controllers utilize policy configurations, which may include latency targets to be achieved or resource allocations to be honored, and interact with resource allocators and schedulers (e.g., thread schedulers, memory allocators, or bandwidth reservation mechanisms) to effect local policy. Controllers also provide feedback on how well they are executing a policy. Pulsar includes an application model which captures resource-sensitive behavior and requirements and is independent of high-level programming models and application programming interfaces.
    Ibm Systems Journal 02/2008;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In this paper we examine the ways in which data center topology choices affect mission-critical business system availability and we propose a methodology for ensuring business resilience by assessing the risks to the mission-critical business systems and then designing a data center topology to mitigate these risks. This methodology is based on the IBM Business Resilience Framework, a framework that accounts for a wide range of concerns, from data center facilities to the business strategy and vision.
    Ibm Systems Journal 02/2008;
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This paper surveys the current state of information technology (IT) availability on the IBM System p5® server platform, then describes how selected hardware and software features of the next-generation IBM Power™ Systems platform (by which we specifically mean IBM POWER6™ processor-based systems running the IBM AIX™ 6 operating system) will enable client IT organizations to more closely approach true continuous availability. Also presented is information on several IT management disciplines that are critical to achieving high levels of availability. The objective is to enable accelerated adoption and success with the new Power Systems platform by explaining how the technologies can be used to improve IT availability. We define the underlying dependencies required to implement the new live partition mobility and the live application mobility features and show how the environment can be best designed for planned maintenance. Until now, the concept of server virtualization in the UNIX® environment has been limited to a single server, but the Power Systems platform extends the virtualization realm. A brief discussion is given comparing software clustering with the new mobility features and illustrating how they are complementary.
    Ibm Systems Journal 02/2008;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This paper introduces, at a high level, the key topics relevant to continuous availability of IBM systems infrastructures. After defining terms and identifying what is encompassed in the scope of continuous availability of IBM system infrastructures, we explain the IT (information technology) life cycle of planning and execution through which an IT organization and its infrastructure pass to create and continuously improve the IT infrastructure. Throughout, we show how each of the subsequent papers in this issue, drawing on real-life deployments, technology developments, and research efforts, expands on important aspects of this introductory discussion.
    Ibm Systems Journal 02/2008;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: A common problem observed on mainframe installations, and one which presents a significant challenge for resiliency and high availability, involves soft failure incidents. n contrast to catastrophic failures, soft failures involve some degree of system shutdown without an obvious cause. This has been described with the phrase: “Systems don't break; they just stop running, and we don't know why.” Extending a medical paradigm, this paper proposes a new method for solutions deployed on IBM z/OS™ systems to respond when either the system or the application stops running. The current approach is to treat the “disease,” by determining the cause of he problem and taking action to prevent its recurrence. The new approach is to determine whether the system or application is behaving abnormally, identify the cause of this abnormal behavior, and take action to treat the “symptom.” This new approach uses machine learning and mathematical modeling to identify normal behavior, enabling the detection of abnormal behavior before it impacts the customer. Based on an analysis of critical problems and preliminary modeling work, the types of abnormal behavior identified are assigned to broad categories. In this paper, we describe the progress being made to address the challenge of soft failures by implementing this new paradigm.
    Ibm Systems Journal 02/2008;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The current approach to the design, maintenance, and governance of service-oriented architecture (SOA) solutions has focused primarily on flow-driven assembly and orchestration of reusable service components. The practical application of this approach in creating industry solutions has been limited, because flow-driven assembly and orchestration models are too rigid and static to accommodate complex, real-world business processes. Furthermore, the approach assumes a rich, easily configured library of reusable service components when in fact the development, maintenance, and governance of these libraries is difficult. An alternative approach pioneered by the IBM Research Division, model-driven business transformation (MDBT), uses a model-driven software synthesis technology to automatically generate production-quality business service components from high-level business process models. In this paper, we present the business entity life cycle analysis (BELA) technique for MDBT-based SOA solution realization and its integration into service-oriented modeling and architecture (SOMA), the end-to-end method from IBM for SOA application and solution development. BELA shifts the process-modeling paradigm from one that is centered on activities to one that is centered on entities. BELA teams process subject-matter experts with IT and data architects to identify and specify business entities and decompose business processes. Supporting synthesis tools then automatically generate the interacting business entity service components and their associated data stores and service interface definitions. We use a large-scale project as an example demonstrating the benefits of this innovation, which include an estimated 40 percent project cost reduction and an estimated 20 percent reduction in cycle time when compared with conventional SOA approaches.
    Ibm Systems Journal 02/2008;
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In this paper we examine managed service in the information and communication technology (ICT) sector, characterized by the polarization between an infrastructure service that is growing in scale and increasingly becoming a commodity and customized or even one-of-a-kind projects. We refer to the approaches taken by three highly innovative advanced service companies, IBM, Ericsson, and Cable & Wireless, to package and deliver ICT service on a more industrialized basis. We identify the six-stage process that describes their journeys to date. We also describe some of the challenges they faced on that journey as well those currently facing them as they move to a higher degree of industrialization. To address these challenges, we propose a model with three axes: offering development, service delivery, and go to market. The model demonstrates how the increasing industrialization of managed service requires an approach integrating all three of these dimensions. We also show that strong governance is required to address the impacts of technological evolution, marketplace dynamics, and corporate culture.
    Ibm Systems Journal 02/2008;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In this paper, we describe continuously available services and application hosting on the Events/IBM.comt Infrastructure (EI)—a continuously available virtualized environment based on three active data centers that has demonstrated 100-percent availability for many premier Web sites, including www.ibm.com. The environment consists of simultaneously active paths spanning three geographically diverse data centers. We describe techniques for automated rapid scaling and continuous availability using IBM WebSphere® clustering, IBM DB2™ replication, load balancing, virtualized network infrastructure components, and IBM System p® virtualization capabilities. We explore best practices for deploying application releases and updates, applying fix packs, and updating hardware and perating systems, all without interrupting service. In addition, we discuss how to troubleshoot and synchronize the vast flows of a multipath redundant solution. Finally, we describe the requirements that dictate continuously available hosting solutions and modifications to our multisite approach for use in fewer data centers. Application of the topics in this paper has resulted in continuous service with no planned or unplanned interruptions over many years of application hosting within the EI.
    Ibm Systems Journal 02/2008;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This paper discusses high availability and disaster recovery solutions and their differences and presents the concepts and technical details of various solutions that combine them for highly critical environments. It discusses the business and regulatory issues that are driving the requirements for these solutions and presents various data center topologies that customers are choosing when implementing 3-site solutions.
    Ibm Systems Journal 02/2008;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: All too often, software designers ignore the fact that a running computer system is a combination of software and hardware. In this combination, hardware may play a crucial role, particularly in time-sensitive systems. In this paper, we first explore the nature and impact that platforms may have on application software and its design. Based on this analysis, a canonical model of software platforms is proposed to assist in more accurately factoring in the effects of platforms on the design of real-time and embedded software applications. Finally, we show how this model can be realized using modern model-driven design standards and methods.
    Ibm Systems Journal 02/2008;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: IBM Parallel Sysplex® is a clustering technology that was designed to address specific client business objectives for IBM mainframe System z® servers. The nondisruptive addition of scalable processing capacity and improved application availability with respect to unplanned and planned outages were two key design objectives. This paper focuses on the evolving technology options that support the business objective of continuous availability. Key technology options are discussed relative to their importance to achieving continuous availability. Best practices for effectively using these technology options to improve availability, based on extensive client experiences, are recommended.
    Ibm Systems Journal 02/2008;
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This paper introduces Distributed Responsive Infrastructure-Virtualization Environment (DRIVE), a tool that provides both an integrated development environment (IDE) and an execution environment and thus supports the entire life cycle of sensor/actuator applications. Developers are only responsible for implementing the core event-handling logic, whereas DRIVE generates the necessary code for message passing and invocation, thus reducing the development skills required. The development methodology, which is component based and model driven, separates the solution model, which captures the business logic, from the deployment model, which reflects the physical computing infrastructure. This allows the administrators to configure and deploy applications on various infrastructure topologies. To illustrate the benefits of DRIVE, we present an example application, dock-door receiving, and show the ways in which DRIVE supports the modeling and development of the application logic and the multiphase deployment of the resulting application in a production environment.
    Ibm Systems Journal 02/2008;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The service-oriented modeling and architecture modeling environment (SOMA-ME) is first a framework for the model-driven design of service-oriented architecture (SOA) solutions using the service-oriented modeling and architecture (SOMA) method. In SOMA-ME, Unified Modeling Language (UML™) profiles extend the UML 2.0 metamodel to domain-specific concepts. SOMA-ME is also a tool that extends the IBM Rational® Software Architect product to provide a development environment and automation features for designing SOA solutions in a systematic and model-driven fashion. Extensibility, traceability, variation-oriented design, and automatic generation of technical documentation and code artifacts are shown to be some of the properties of the SOMA-ME tool.
    Ibm Systems Journal 02/2008;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: For a service delivery system to produce optimal solutions to service-related business problems, it must be based on an approach that involves many of the traditional functional areas in an organization. Unfortunately, most business school curricula mirror the older traditional organizational structure that dominated businesses throughout most of the twentieth century. This structure typically consisted of vertically organized functions (or silos), such as production, marketing, and finance, with each silo operating largely independently of the others. Similarly, business schools today are usually organized by functional departments—such as marketing, finance, accounting, and operations management—with little interaction among them. Within this traditional silo-structured environment, it is very difficult to properly develop a curriculum, or even a course, in service management. Consequently, a significant gap exists between the education received by business school graduates and the skills that they need to succeed in today's service-intense environment. This paper explores the underlying causes of this gap and suggests ways in which the emerging field of service science can facilitate the changes in business school curricula that will make them more relevant in meeting the needs of today's businesses and organizations.
    Ibm Systems Journal 02/2008;

Related Journals