Educational leadership: journal of the Department of Supervision and Curriculum Development, N.E.A (EDUC LEADERSHIP )

Publisher: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development; National Education Association of the United States. Dept. of Supervision and Curriculum Development

Description

EL is ASCD's flagship publication. With a circulation of 175,000, EL is acknowledged throughout the world as an authoritative source of information about teaching and learning, new ideas and practices relevant to practicing educators, and the latest trends and issues affecting prekindergarten through higher education. EL is published eight times each year, September through May, with a combined December/January issue.

Impact factor 0.23

  • 5-year impact
    0.24
  • Cited half-life
    0.00
  • Immediacy index
    0.05
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
    0.14
  • Website
    Educational Leadership website
  • Other titles
    Educational leadership
  • ISSN
    0013-1784
  • OCLC
    2576039
  • Material type
    Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Journal / Magazine / Newspaper, Internet Resource

Publications in this journal

  • Educational leadership: journal of the Department of Supervision and Curriculum Development, N.E.A 01/2015; 72(4):16-22.
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    ABSTRACT: Contrary to what many people assume, writes Stewart, a high-quality teacher workforce is not the simple result of some traditional cultural respect for teachers that exists in some countries. Rather, it requires deliberate policy choices. In a tour of seven countries that traditionally score high on international tests of student performance (Singapore, China, Japan, U.K., Finland, Canada, and Australia), Stewart describes many ways in which policymakers support effective teaching. Examples include recruiting the most able candidate into the teaching profession; providing time and structure for meaningful professional development; modernizing teacher preparation programs; and improving teacher evaluation and compensation.
    Educational leadership: journal of the Department of Supervision and Curriculum Development, N.E.A 12/2010;
  • Educational leadership: journal of the Department of Supervision and Curriculum Development, N.E.A 10/2010; 68(2):52-57.
  • Educational leadership: journal of the Department of Supervision and Curriculum Development, N.E.A 09/2010; 68(1):22-26.
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    ABSTRACT: One important principle of social psychology, writes Nisbett, is that some big-seeming interventions have little or no effect. This article discusses a number of cases from the field of education that confirm this principle. For example, Head Start seems like a big intervention, but research has indicated that its effects on academic achievement gaps are slight because it is not always implemented well. Fortunately, research has also found that some even bigger preschool interventions, such as the Perry Preschool Project and the Abecedarian Project, do produce large effects. On the school level, Nisbett asserts that charter schools in general do not necessarily produce positive effects, but that certain intensive types of charter schools--for example, KIPP schools--do. Nisbett also discusses a second principle of social psychology--that small interventions sometimes produce large effects. He gives several examples, such as Carol Dweck's work, which teaches students that they can increase their intelligence through their own efforts. The author concludes that to close achievement gaps, we need to be far-sighted enough to invest in very big interventions that are effective--and creative enough to consider small interventions as well.
    Educational leadership: journal of the Department of Supervision and Curriculum Development, N.E.A 01/2010;
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    ABSTRACT: Although today's performance pay plans take many forms, the most commonly proposed version--in which teachers are rewarded on the basis of their students' standardized test scores--flows from flawed logic and several troublesome assumptions: that teachers lack motivation and supposedly need financial awards to give students what they need; that U.S. schools are failing compared with school systems in other parts of the world; and that measuring academic achievement--through the use of standardized testing--is all that counts. Denver, Colorado's Pay for Performance pilot resulted in a new approach to looking at performance. The new plan replaces the traditional approach to compensation with its combined focus on student academic growth; teacher knowledge and skill; professional evaluation; and market incentives, which refer to bonuses awarded to teachers working in difficult-to-serve schools or in difficult-to-staff positions. The discussion of performance pay should lead states and districts to a new consideration of the true goals of education.
    Educational leadership: journal of the Department of Supervision and Curriculum Development, N.E.A 01/2009;
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    ABSTRACT: Six high-performing/high-poverty schools provide insights into what it takes to make a dramatic turnaround. School leaders had to make tough calls--and many of those decisions were about how to use resources. The budget in a high-performing, high-poverty school is a moral document, reflective of the school's beliefs about the conditions necessary to sustain success for all students and the adults who serve them. As budgets constrict, school leaders maintain their success by working collaboratively with staff to stay focused on the priorities that guide their work. Leaders in these schools begin by asking themselves questions that deal with three areas: (1) building the necessary leadership capacity; (2) focusing the staff's everyday core work on student, professional, and system learning; and (3) creating and fostering a safe, healthy, and supportive learning environment for all.
    Educational leadership: journal of the Department of Supervision and Curriculum Development, N.E.A 01/2009;
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    ABSTRACT: Although professional learning communities have gained wide acceptance as a way for teachers to support one another's learning, there is less attention paid to the need for principals to meet together to enhance learning and leadership. Three years ago Sterrett (an elementary school principal) and Haas (a high school principal in the same district) realized that they needed a nonthreatening place to share frustrations and exchange strategies. They began meeting together at each other's schools for an hour or two once a month to air problems, brainstorm solutions, and share their latest learning about education issues. Some of their best ideas for improving instruction came out of these monthly tete-a-tetes. The authors share six norms they follow to ensure their monthly mini-learning community remains fruitful: honoring each other's time; moving from complaining to problem solving; focusing on improving instruction; being honest and noncompetitive; including time to observe instruction; and spurring each other's professional growth. (Contains 1 endnote.)
    Educational leadership: journal of the Department of Supervision and Curriculum Development, N.E.A 01/2009;
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    ABSTRACT: Since 2002, the Partnership for 21st Century Skills has been the leading advocacy organization in the United States focused on infusing 21st century skills into education. Its "Framework for 21st Century Learning," the result of a consensus among hundreds of stakeholders, describes the skills, knowledge, and expertise students need to succeed in work and life. Here, the author spells out the goals of this partnership.
    Educational leadership: journal of the Department of Supervision and Curriculum Development, N.E.A 01/2009;
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    ABSTRACT: Typically embodied in classroom-based projects, service learning aims to link community service with the school curriculum to enhance both character development and academic skills. Service learning can also go beyond these goals to prepare students to become engaged citizens, by expanding their understanding of social problems and the role of civic action in solutions to these problems. Roughly one-quarter of all schools engage at least some of their students in service learning projects. Service learning projects cut across all subject areas and grade levels. Several studies in the last decade have addressed the role that service learning can play in increasing students' commitment to civic participation. The strongest effects have generally been found for service learning programs that have the explicit aim of developing active citizenship, in contrast with those that emphasize community service and character building. To turn service learning projects into meaningful opportunities to learn about democracy and civic participation, teachers need access both to training and to worthwhile service opportunities for their students. They need encouragement from school and district leaders to tackle real-world problems and controversial issues. Every community faces significant issues that don't have simple solutions, from conserving water to providing adequate support for the elderly, and even changing school policies. Bringing these issues into the classroom motivates students to grapple with tough challenges.
    Educational leadership: journal of the Department of Supervision and Curriculum Development, N.E.A 01/2009;
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    ABSTRACT: At a time when the United States faces unprecedented challenges at home and abroad, public schools must do far more to prepare young people to be engaged, ethical advocates of "liberty and justice for all." This article explores what makes some people behave ethically--even at the risk of their own lives--and asserts that developing moral habits of the heart is the central mission of schools. It describes "schools of conscience" that support students in their search for meaning while teaching them the civic principles and virtues necessary for sustaining the common good in a democracy.
    Educational leadership: journal of the Department of Supervision and Curriculum Development, N.E.A 01/2009;
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    ABSTRACT: Student affect--the attitudes, interests, and values that students exhibit and acquire in school--can play a profoundly important role in students' postschool lives, possibly an even more significant role than that played by students' cognitive achievements. If student affect is so crucial, then why don't teachers assess it? One deterrent is that few teachers know how to do it. Yet assessing affect is relatively straightforward. Affect inventories are typically patterned after the attitudinal inventories that organizational psychologist Rensis Likert devised almost 80 years ago. An inventory presents a series of statements with which students are asked to agree or disagree. To score the inventory, points are awarded for "agreement with positive statements" as well as for "disagreement with negative statements." For important affective outcomes teachers wish to promote in their schools--for example, students' sense of social responsibility--the time has come to do more than merely talk about these desirable outcomes. It's time to measure them.
    Educational leadership: journal of the Department of Supervision and Curriculum Development, N.E.A 01/2009;
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    ABSTRACT: From 1998 to 2008, voters in California, Arizona, and Massachusetts passed anti-bilingual education ballot initiatives that required English-only instruction for the vast majority of the states' English language learners. The contentious political discourse leading up to the votes largely ignored the research on best practices for educating English language learners, as well as the practical and pedagogical issues facing educators. The author of this article examines the research to counter several "myths" underlying the English-only movement: that all schools should be required to adopt the same approach in serving their differing populations of English language learners; that bilingual instruction is the reason for English language learners' low levels of English proficiency; and that students can learn English quickly and then easily catch up with native English speakers in literacy and content learning.
    Educational leadership: journal of the Department of Supervision and Curriculum Development, N.E.A 01/2009;
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    ABSTRACT: Scads of pseudodiagnostic tests are peddled by commercial vendors who recognize that desperate educators will do almost anything to dodge an impending accountability cataclysm. And this "almost anything" includes buying tests that promise to help a teacher raise test scores--even if they don't. Accordingly, today's educators need to be aware of three types of pseudodiagnostic tests currently failing to live up to their claims. This article describes the features of these pseudodiagnostic tests: (1) The Too-Few-Items Test; (2) The Single-Trait Vertical Scale Test; and (3) The Fuzzy-Measure Test. Tips on choosing legitimate diagnostic tests are also presented.
    Educational leadership: journal of the Department of Supervision and Curriculum Development, N.E.A 01/2009;
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    ABSTRACT: Media literacy is making a comeback, spurred by students' access to unlimited information on the Internet. Can schools provide the skills students need to become media literate in a digital world? Researchers find that reading for understanding online requires the same skills as offline reading, including using prior knowledge and making predictions, plus a set of additional critical-thinking skills that reflect the open-ended, continually changing online context. Choosing appropriate search engines, following relevant links, and judging the validity of information are difficult challenges, not only for students of all ages, but also for most adults, including many teachers. Educators face enormous challenges in preparing their students to be critical online readers. For the most part, the teaching of critical-thinking skills is not part of the regular curriculum, and printed text is still considered the mainstay of school reading. Moreover, many recent studies identify persistent barriers to integrating new technologies into instruction, including lack of training and help for teachers and insufficient access to functioning technology. Yet more and more students spend more and more time online. Rather than ignoring this fact of life, the author asserts educators and education policymakers should embrace it.
    Educational leadership: journal of the Department of Supervision and Curriculum Development, N.E.A 01/2009;
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    ABSTRACT: In an age when students gravitate to online sources for research--and when tremendous amounts of both reputable and questionable information are available online--many have come to regard the Internet itself as a culprit in students' plagiarism. Some teachers go so far as to forbid students from researching online, in the mistaken assumption that if students are working from hard-copy sources only, the problem will disappear. The authors believe that an approach far different from either warnings and punishment or attempts to curtail online research is warranted. Teachers who wish to prevent plagiarism should devote extensive instruction to the component tasks of writing from sources. In this article, the authors offer several strategies on how teachers can discourage plagiarism among their students.
    Educational leadership: journal of the Department of Supervision and Curriculum Development, N.E.A 01/2009;
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    ABSTRACT: Digital tools, such as blogs and wikis, now make it easy for educators to embrace continual learning. Thousands of accomplished educators are now writing blogs in which they reflect on instruction, challenge assumptions, question policies, offer advice, design solutions, and learn together. All this collective knowledge is readily available for free. Feed readers, also known as aggregators, can automatically check nearly any Web site for new content dozens of times each day, limiting the amount of time spent browsing and customizing learning experiences. Those new to the technology should start by using a feed reader as a learning tool for a few weeks and encourage peers to come on board. Those confident in their writing ability can easily start their own blog using such services as Typepad and Edublogs. And those who want to transition to writing blogs can start by writing wikis using such services as Wikispaces and Wet Paint.
    Educational leadership: journal of the Department of Supervision and Curriculum Development, N.E.A 01/2009;