Education and training of the mentally retarded (Educ Train Ment Retard )

Publisher: Council for Exceptional Children. Division on Developmental Disabilities

Description

  • Impact factor
    0.00
  • 5-year impact
    0.00
  • Cited half-life
    0.00
  • Immediacy index
    0.00
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
    0.00
  • Other titles
    Education and training in developmental disabilities
  • ISSN
    0013-1237
  • OCLC
    51822274
  • Material type
    Periodical
  • Document type
    Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publications in this journal

  • Education and training of the mentally retarded 01/1990; 25.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Investigated the effects of a self-instructional training package on the job-task sequencing of 4 mentally retarded students (aged 18–20 yrs, IQs 43–65). The effects of training on the Ss' task completion and task repetition were also examined. Findings indicate that training increased job-task sequencing for all Ss. Data reveal increases in task completion for 3 Ss and decreases in task repetition for all Ss. Target behaviors were maintained up to 3 mo posttraining. Results support the use of self-instruction in the vocational training of mentally retarded persons. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
    Education and training of the mentally retarded 11/1986;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Evaluated a simulation training program to teach bank depositing skills to a 25-yr-old moderately mentally retarded male (IQ 46). Based on a task analysis of specific skills, the S was instructed to operate an automated banking machine. The skills of accessing the machine, conducting the transaction, and terminating the transaction were sequentially taught using a simulated mock-up. Generalization probes in the natural environment were conducted before, during, and after training. Results indicate that up to 6 mo after training, the S maintained appropriate banking skills using an actual automated banking machine. Findings support the utility of simulated training programs to teach community survival skills to individuals who are mentally retarded. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
    Education and training of the mentally retarded 11/1986;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Describes the Rec Club program, an approach to community-based recreational development for adults with mild to moderate retardation. The program was intended to integrate specific skill training activities within a broader effort to enhance independent recreational activities. All activities were conducted in the community so that the long-term access of the club was not limited by the availability of specialized facilities or funding. Training focused only on the specific skills necessary for successful participation in community setting. The training approach emphasized that the minimal amount of assistance necessary to insure the participants' success was provided, and assistance provided to participants was reduced as the participants' skills increased. The success of the program is illustrated by data from 6 Ss on activities such as bowling and riding the bus. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
    Education and training of the mentally retarded 11/1986;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Examined the basic counting competencies, difficulties, skill progressions, and variation that could be expected in mentally handicapped school children. 13 elementary (aged 6 yrs to 10 yrs 10 mo, IQs 33–49) and 23 intermediate (aged 11 yrs to 14 yrs 2 mo, IQs 36–50) children classified as moderately mentally handicapped and 37 elementary (aged 5 yrs 10 mo to 10 yrs 11 mo, IQs 51–80) and 27 intermediate (aged 11 yrs 1 mo to 13 yrs 3 mo, IQs 51–80) children classified as mildly mentally handicapped were individually administered structured interviews. Analyses indicated deficiencies in basic counting competencies and systematic oral- and object-counting errors. Object-counting competence preceded automatic pattern recognition, and there were striking individual differences in ability, even within "homogeneous" groups of Ss. Error analyses provided clues to oral- and object-counting difficulties and direction for remedial efforts. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
    Education and training of the mentally retarded 11/1986;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Use of a constant delay procedure by students classified as moderately mentally retarded peers was demonstrated to be an effective and parsimonious procedure to teach sight words. Five peer tutors (aged 9–21 yrs; IQs 40–53) were first taught the sight words with the time delay procedure and then taught to use the delay procedure to teach the words to 6 younger peers (aged 6–9 yrs; IQs 37–49) who were also classified moderately mentally retarded. Younger peers learned all 5 sight words in 1–4 sessions. Results support the use of both peer modeling and the delay procedure in the reading instruction of mentally retarded students. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
    Education and training of the mentally retarded 11/1986;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Studied the enhancement of associative learning, mental imagery use, and creativity among 19 13–15 yr old educable mentally retarded (EMR) Ss and 22 age-matched controls. Ss participated in an imagery-based associative learning elaboration task followed by a delayed test of incidental learning. Elaboration responses were scored according to 2 measures of creativity (fluency and originality), and these measures were related to incidental learning. While the fluency and incidental learning scores of controls were somewhat higher than those of EMR Ss, both EMR Ss and controls were able to generate original elaborations. Most original elaborations were feature/theme based, and originality was positively related to incidental learning. It is concluded that a clarification of the conditions that lead to greater flexibility and originality in EMR Ss may contribute to their adjustment to the demands of mainstream educational and occupational environments. (30 ref) (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
    Education and training of the mentally retarded 08/1986;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Evaluated subsequent community adjustment of 40 mentally retarded persons (IQs 50–85) who had been diagnosed as emotionally disturbed at ages 12–19 yrs. After a 10-yr period, Ss, who had been hospitalized as adolescents, were contacted and interviewed as to their current overall social and vocational adjustment. Outcome was evaluated in terms of previous findings by the 2nd author and T. Barnes (see record 1981-21947-001) that in similar cohorts with mild mental retardation, but no psychiatric disorders, there were favorable outcomes in the majority of cases and that nonretarded psychiatric cohorts generally had such outcomes to a slightly lesser degree. Only 30% of the current Ss could be judged as having a favorable adult outcome (i.e., generally worked full-time and were self-supporting). An additional 42.5% often reported full-time employment but tended to be totally dependent or minimally self-supporting. (41 ref) (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
    Education and training of the mentally retarded 08/1986;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: 373 college students compared "mentally retarded" and "normal" persons on 18 personality-trait characteristics. Three factors were found to underlie the Ss' perceptions with mentally retarded persons being perceived more favorably than normal persons on traits indicative of amiability, less favorably on traits reflective of cognitive/mental competencies, and differing on those traits suggestive of social/self control. None of the S variables (e.g., age, sex, level of exposure, characterizations of mentally retarded persons) had a major impact on these perceptions. Various explanations for this apparent stability in people's perceptions of mentally retarded persons are outlined, including the possible independence of people's perceptions of social groups and their individual members and the potential for initial biases to lead to behaviors that confirm the observer's stereotypes. (31 ref) (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
    Education and training of the mentally retarded 02/1986;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: A repeated finding in studies of child abuse and neglect is the overrepresentation of handicapped children. Such findings are examined in light of the paradoxically low incidence of handicapped children in state and national statistics on maltreated children. Drawing on existing data and a survey of 51 child protection services workers, it is suggested that the child protection system may be neglecting developmentally disabled children by failing to recognize and document handicaps among maltreated populations, although Ss indicated an awareness of the relationship between maltreatment and developmental disabilities and judged themselves adequately skilled in detecting developmental disabilities. The need is stressed for better reporting systems, coordination between agencies that serve developmentally disabled and maltreated children, and training for child protection workers. (36 ref) (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
    Education and training of the mentally retarded 02/1986;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Assessed the degree of community integration of 300 17–24 yr olds who had participated in special education programs for students labeled mentally retarded. Surveys were administered by trained interviewers on variables related to basic self-care, home management, community usage, use of free time, recreational/leisure activities, and self-satisfaction. Results indicate that Ss were generally satisfied with their present situation and that most Ss had some degree of competence in the area of independent living skills. However, the majority of Ss' recreational interests were passive and home-based, and few Ss made use of community facilities. Relative to mildly retarded Ss, moderately to severely retarded Ss were more likely to report a lack of work skills, loneliness, and health problems. (22 ref) (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
    Education and training of the mentally retarded 02/1986;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Teachers of moderately to severely developmentally disabled students typically employ some form of assistance procedure in order to facilitate or prompt correct responding. Assistance may take the form of verbal, model, or physical prompts. In any form, these additions to the natural cue must eventually be removed or faded to ensure independent performance in the presence of naturally occurring stimuli. The systems of stimulus fading, stimulus shaping, increasing assistance, decreasing assistance, graduated guidance, and time delay incorporate fading strategies to transfer control from the prompt to the naturally occurring stimulus. While many research accounts attest to the efficacy of discrete systems, few investigations validate integrated procedures or compare assistance systems to identify the most salient teaching strategies. Existing assistance procedures are reviewed, and suggestions for the selection and integration of these procedures are presented. (60 ref) (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
    Education and training of the mentally retarded 02/1986;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Describes an employment preparation program that served 53 mentally retarded or learning disabled 18–59 yr olds in terms of assessment, pre-employment training, work experience, on-site training in competitive employment, and supported employment. An evaluation was conducted that highlighted the importance of training approach and methodology, program management, and trainee characteristics in successful participation in competitive employment settings. (27 ref) (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
    Education and training of the mentally retarded 02/1986;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Stimulus control procedures have been useful in reducing clinically significant problems of aggression and related aberrant behaviors presented by developmentally disabled individuals. These procedures involve the identification and modification of immediately preceding stimulus events that are functional in instigating the aggressive behaviors. Limitations, however, remain in use of stimulus control procedures in that a high relationship between specific stimulus events and episodes of aggression is seldom observed. Recent conceptual and methodological innovations in applied behavior analysis provide the potential for increasing understanding of the stimulus events that control aggression in this clinical population. These innovations involve the definition and analysis of setting events, which involve physiological conditions, environmental events or objects, and behavioral histories. The potential use of this expanded stimulus control model is illustrated with recent research findings. Implications for more effective treatment of aggression in the developmentally disabled person are suggested. (33 ref) (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
    Education and training of the mentally retarded 02/1986;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Field independence and dependence were compared in 80 mildly retarded and 80 non-retarded children (all between 8 and 13 years old). Non-retarded children, especially older whites, were more field independent. Mildly retarded children, especially younger blacks, were more field dependent. (Author/DB)
    Education and training of the mentally retarded 12/1985;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The article describes procedures necessary to implement a community-based instructional model for vocational training of handicapped students. Strategies for use in gaining administrative support, in programming, community site selection and development, parent involvement, and employer participation are provided. Benefits of community-based vocational training are illustrated with a case study. (Author)
    Education and training of the mentally retarded 12/1985;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Meta-analysis was used to statistically integrate the findings of 30 studies of language intervention efficacy in mentally retarded preschool children. Results indicated that (1) intervention has positive, immediate gains for retarded children and that (2) significant neurological involvement may impede intervention success. (Author/DB)
    Education and training of the mentally retarded 12/1985;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Neurological changes of Alzheimer's disease have been consistently documented in individuals with Down syndrome 35 years of age or older suggesting a genetic relationship between the conditions. The paper discusses the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease, its progressive behavioral impact on persons with Down syndrome, and implications for services to Down syndrome adults. (Author/DB)
    Education and training of the mentally retarded 12/1985;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The effectiveness and efficiency of two instructional prompting procedures, progressive time delay and the system of least prompts, in teaching manual signs was evaluated with three moderately or severely retarded adolescents with additional handicaps. Results indicated both procedures were effective though the time delay method appeared to be more efficient. (Author/DB)
    Education and training of the mentally retarded 12/1985;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The effectiveness of interactive video in teaching the skill of asking for help was evaluated with 116 secondary-aged mildly (105) and moderately (11) mentally retarded students taught the eight-lesson interactive video sequence. Comparison of pre- and post-tests of both knowledge and application showed positive effects of the curriculum. (DB)
    Education and training of the mentally retarded 12/1985;

Related Journals