Economic and political weekly Journal Impact Factor & Information

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Website Economic and Political Weekly website
Other titles Economic and political weekly, Economic & political weekly
ISSN 0012-9976
OCLC 1567377
Material type Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Journal / Magazine / Newspaper, Internet Resource

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Social science textbooks are not and cannot be objective or unbiased. What is included and what is excluded in a textbook indicates the ideology and the aims of the textbooks, whether the aims are stated or unstated. The questions are: Which ideology? Which aims? Some excerpts from the present NCERT (National Council of Educational Research and Training) textbooks indicate unstated aims of facilitating students' conformation and integration into the present social system. This is indicated by the use--and absence--of terms and concepts such as "capitalism" in these textbooks. Apparently the unstated aim is that if capitalism remains un-understood and unanalysed, it may not be questioned, and students will not realise that there is any alternative to capitalism. In the present circumstances, what can a textbook maker who stands on the left do?
    Economic and political weekly 04/2015; Vol - L(N0. 17):109-119.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Although the structural reforms, initiated in 1991, did not lead to any appreciable increase in either the efficiency or the export orientation of Indian manufacturing firms, unexpectedly, there has been a visible improvement in manufacturing design capabilities in certain segments, for instance, in the motor vehicle sector. The paper suggests that the development of “frugal engineering”—an approach of “frugality” in resolving complex design problems—is a real advance. It suggests, further, that this approach developed from the experiences of the procedures laid down in the phased manufacturing programme of the 1950s, and first found expression in the successful forays into some specific export markets by Indian vehicle manufacturers in the late 1970s and 1980s. Although this design expertise cannot solve the problems of manufacturing efficiency, particularly across the wider industrial sphere, it indicates that Indian firms have the expertise to resolve problems related to the manufacturing sphere if strategic goals are appropriately set by managers.
    Economic and political weekly 04/2015; L(14):45-50.
  • Economic and political weekly 03/2015; L(13):46-52.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Since it is neither feasible nor desirable to reduce central grants to the states equivalent to the increase in tax devolution, the award of the Fourteenth Finance Commission is certainly not revenue neutral for the union government. But the larger question is not of arithmetic but of a shift in policy towards greater fiscal autonomy to the states by ensuring more than 70% of the fund flow through the Finance Commission route and also preserving the fiscal space for the union for its own functions. It is about getting expenditure priorities right at each level of government.
    Economic and political weekly 03/2015; L(12):33-35.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Bihar shares a large part of its border with Nepal, including 10 trade transit points for Indo–Nepal trade. There is much potential for economic gains towards which India and the state of Bihar can cooperate with Nepal within the mutually agreed formal framework. The region has a locational advantage that bestows natural interdependence, which is yet to be utilised. There is a need to shift from bilateralism to subregionalism as far as South Asian regional cooperation is concerned. T he renewed policy thrust on India's relationship with her immediate neighbours presents an apt context to revisit the nature and forms of cross-border economic engagements. Regional trade and economic cooperation within the South Asian region remains among the lowest in world despite several initiatives in the form of treaties and agreements, including the much talked about South Asian Free Trade Area (SAFTA). Most of these initiatives have adopted a bilateral or multilateral approach , wherein the perspective from the bordering regions has largely been ignored. One aspect that could stimulate cooperation between the countries of South Asia, but remains relatively un-explored, is the identifi cation and promotion of potential economic cooperation across bordering regions on both sides, which in turn can be linked further to enhance regional integration. This could have particular spillover effects in case of geographically large countries such as India, where the federal structure provides adequate space to its provinces to engage in cross-border activities within the formal bilateral framework. However, there is little evidence or projection of the ways and means as well as gains that such an exercise may invoke. Though regional trade in South Asia in general, and between India and Nepal in particular, has received enriching research contribution (Shrestha 2013; Taneja and Choudhary 2011; Rajkarnikar 2011; Sharan 2010; Pandey 2010), subre-gional perspectives have not got the attention they d eserve. Studies on bordering states (Chanda 2013; Kansakar 2012; Pohit and Taneja 2000) have primarily captured the dynamics of cross-border informal trade rather than exploring the potential in these regions for catalysing cooperation. In fact, given that India shares a traditionally unique relationship with other South Asian countries, particularly N epal, it may consider leveraging it to play a greater role within the region, as situated within a subregional framework. One of the unique characteristics of Indo–Nepal interaction, which is also refl ective of the potential of economic partnership, is the direct cultural affi ni-ty between some of the states of India with Nepal with or without an alignment with national strategies. Bihar is one such state that shares its cultural legacy and to some extent economic characteristics with Nepal, which may not necessarily overlap with the rest of India. These local commonalities between bordering regions are fundamental to various forms of economic interaction between them irrespective of the formal Indo–Nepal framework. It is this context that justifi es a subregional p erspective towards expanding and strengthening of formal cooperation between India and Nepal, which in turn may be linked to other South Asian countries, at least to some extent.
    Economic and political weekly 03/2015; L(10):20-22.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Bihar shares a large part of its border with Nepal, including 10 trade transit points for Indo–Nepal trade. There is much potential for economic gains towards which India and the state of Bihar can cooperate with Nepal within the mutually agreed formal framework. The region has a locational advantage that bestows natural interdependence, which is yet to be utilised. There is a need to shift from bilateralism to subregionalism as far as South Asian regional cooperation is concerned. T he renewed policy thrust on India's relationship with her immediate neighbours presents an apt context to revisit the nature and forms of cross-border economic engagements. Regional trade and economic cooperation within the South Asian region remains among the lowest in world despite several initiatives in the form of treaties and agreements, including the much talked about South Asian Free Trade Area (SAFTA). Most of these initiatives have adopted a bilateral or multilateral approach , wherein the perspective from the bordering regions has largely been ignored. One aspect that could stimulate cooperation between the countries of South Asia, but remains relatively un-explored, is the identifi cation and promotion of potential economic cooperation across bordering regions on both sides, which in turn can be linked further to enhance regional integration. This could have particular spillover effects in case of geographically large countries such as India, where the federal structure provides adequate space to its provinces to engage in cross-border activities within the formal bilateral framework. However, there is little evidence or projection of the ways and means as well as gains that such an exercise may invoke. Though regional trade in South Asia in general, and between India and Nepal in particular, has received enriching research contribution (Shrestha 2013; Taneja and Choudhary 2011; Rajkarnikar 2011; Sharan 2010; Pandey 2010), subre-gional perspectives have not got the attention they d eserve. Studies on bordering states (Chanda 2013; Kansakar 2012; Pohit and Taneja 2000) have primarily captured the dynamics of cross-border informal trade rather than exploring the potential in these regions for catalysing cooperation. In fact, given that India shares a traditionally unique relationship with other South Asian countries, particularly N epal, it may consider leveraging it to play a greater role within the region, as situated within a subregional framework. One of the unique characteristics of Indo–Nepal interaction, which is also refl ective of the potential of economic partnership, is the direct cultural affi ni-ty between some of the states of India with Nepal with or without an alignment with national strategies. Bihar is one such state that shares its cultural legacy and to some extent economic characteristics with Nepal, which may not necessarily overlap with the rest of India. These local commonalities between bordering regions are fundamental to various forms of economic interaction between them irrespective of the formal Indo–Nepal framework. It is this context that justifi es a subregional p erspective towards expanding and strengthening of formal cooperation between India and Nepal, which in turn may be linked to other South Asian countries, at least to some extent.
    Economic and political weekly 03/2015; L(10):20-22.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Bihar shares a large part of its border with Nepal, including 10 trade transit points for Indo–Nepal trade. There is much potential for economic gains towards which India and the state of Bihar can cooperate with Nepal within the mutually agreed formal framework. The region has a locational advantage that bestows natural interdependence, which is yet to be utilised. There is a need to shift from bilateralism to subregionalism as far as South Asian regional cooperation is concerned. T he renewed policy thrust on India's relationship with her immediate neighbours presents an apt context to revisit the nature and forms of cross-border economic engagements. Regional trade and economic cooperation within the South Asian region remains among the lowest in world despite several initiatives in the form of treaties and agreements, including the much talked about South Asian Free Trade Area (SAFTA). Most of these initiatives have adopted a bilateral or multilateral approach , wherein the perspective from the bordering regions has largely been ignored. One aspect that could stimulate cooperation between the countries of South Asia, but remains relatively un-explored, is the identifi cation and promotion of potential economic cooperation across bordering regions on both sides, which in turn can be linked further to enhance regional integration. This could have particular spillover effects in case of geographically large countries such as India, where the federal structure provides adequate space to its provinces to engage in cross-border activities within the formal bilateral framework. However, there is little evidence or projection of the ways and means as well as gains that such an exercise may invoke. Though regional trade in South Asia in general, and between India and Nepal in particular, has received enriching research contribution (Shrestha 2013; Taneja and Choudhary 2011; Rajkarnikar 2011; Sharan 2010; Pandey 2010), subre-gional perspectives have not got the attention they d eserve. Studies on bordering states (Chanda 2013; Kansakar 2012; Pohit and Taneja 2000) have primarily captured the dynamics of cross-border informal trade rather than exploring the potential in these regions for catalysing cooperation. In fact, given that India shares a traditionally unique relationship with other South Asian countries, particularly N epal, it may consider leveraging it to play a greater role within the region, as situated within a subregional framework. One of the unique characteristics of Indo–Nepal interaction, which is also refl ective of the potential of economic partnership, is the direct cultural affi ni-ty between some of the states of India with Nepal with or without an alignment with national strategies. Bihar is one such state that shares its cultural legacy and to some extent economic characteristics with Nepal, which may not necessarily overlap with the rest of India. These local commonalities between bordering regions are fundamental to various forms of economic interaction between them irrespective of the formal Indo–Nepal framework. It is this context that justifi es a subregional p erspective towards expanding and strengthening of formal cooperation between India and Nepal, which in turn may be linked to other South Asian countries, at least to some extent.
    Economic and political weekly 03/2015; L(10):20-22.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Indo–Nepal Economic Cooperation through Bihar: Bilateralism to Subregionalism Bihar shares a large part of its border with Nepal, including 10 trade transit points for Indo–Nepal trade. There is much potential for economic gains towards which India and the state of Bihar can cooperate with Nepal within the mutually agreed formal framework. The region has a locational advantage that bestows natural interdependence, which is yet to be utilised. There is a need to shift from bilateralism to subregionalism as far as South Asian regional cooperation is concerned.
    Economic and political weekly 03/2015; 50(10):20-22.