Journal of East African Natural History (J East Af Nat Hist Soc Natl Mus )

Publisher: East Africa Natural History Society; National Museums of Kenya

Description

Discontinued. Continued as Journal of East African Natural History (1026-1613).

  • Impact factor
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  • 5-year impact
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  • Cited half-life
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  • ISSN
    0012-8317
  • OCLC
    33255669
  • Material type
    Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Journal / Magazine / Newspaper, Internet Resource

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: From its origins in the South and Central American tropics, Parthenium hysterophorus has invaded locations in Australia, Asia and Africa, often with devastating impacts on health and livelihoods. Following studies on the distribution of parthenium in Ethiopia and southern Africa and subsequent recommendations for regional surveillance, this project investigated the actual extent of invasion by the weed to provide baseline data for its management in Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda. Roadside surveys undertaken on the basis of the CLIMEX simulation recorded parthenium in drainage trenches, dumpsites, abandoned buildings, construction sites, residential areas, rangelands and crop fields, thus emphasising the fact that successive dispersal and establishment of the weed closely follows patterns of disturbance. Results from this survey reiterate the need for immediate control of infestation in critical ecosystems and development of effective policy guidelines and strategies for management of this invasive species.
    Journal of East African Natural History 10/2014; 103(1):49-57.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: An investigation to assess the relationship between coarse particulate organic matter (CPOM) and macroinvertebrate communities was undertaken in the Njoro River, Kenya during 2010. Significantly lower macroinvertebrate densities and diversities were observed in study sites with low Coarse Particulate Organic Matter (CPOM) content. The Mugo study site had the highest CPOM content and macroinvertebrate density and diversity. The unidentifiable detritus category (i.e. small CPOM fragments) had the highest influence on macroinvertebrate taxa whereas twigs had the least influence. The benthic samples were dominated by detritivores, but no shredders were recorded. Our results suggest that CPOM is an important determinant of the macroinvertebrate assemblages in streams. Given this, we believe that it is important to conserve tropical stream riparian vegetation due to their important role as a source of CPOM in streams.
    Journal of East African Natural History 07/2014; 103(1):39-48.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Warthogs without incisors were described from the Cape of Good Hope as Phacochoerus aethiopicus and warthogs possessing incisors were first found in Senegal and later named Phacochoerus africanus. During the second half of the 18th century and the whole of the 19th century, the majority of workers recognised these two taxa as distinct. Twentieth century palaeontologists working in Africa also recognised the two species of warthogs in the Pleistocene and Holocene fossil records and were aware of the differences between the two Recent species. But in the same period, most zoologists considered all warthogs to belong to a single polytypic species. Re-examination of the literature and inspection of recent material confirm distinctive differences corresponding with geographic distribution of two species of warthogs: the widespread common warthog Phacochoerus africanus and the Cape warthog P. aethiopicus. Whereas the Cape warthog, P. aethiopicus aethiopicus, became extinct in South Africa in the 1870s, it survives in Kenya, Ethiopia and Somalia as a geographically isolated subspecies, P. aethiopicus delamerei. This discontinuous distribution has been noted in the literature, as are the criteria which distinguish P. aethiopicus from P. africanus.
    Journal of East African Natural History 04/2011;
  • Journal of East African Natural History 04/2011;
  • Journal of East African Natural History 01/2011; 100(2):69-87.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Kyllinga mbitheana, a new species, is described from eastern Kenya and its conservation status assessed. The species is a tufted perennial to 200 mm tall, with white inflorescences and glumes to 2.5 mm long. Kyllinga mbitheana is most similar to K. microbulbosa and K. brunneoalba, but is unique in Kyllinga, being the only species with a spikelet bearing up to ten fertile flowers. The spikelet has an indeterminate rachilla with distichously arranged glumes, and the floral ontogenetic pattern is similar to that of other Cyperoideae. The diagnostic laterally compressed nutlets can be observed in the ontogenetic phase, where the dorsiventrally orientated stigma primordia give rise to a laterally flattened ovary. The pollen grains have one distal pore and five lateral colpi, have micro-echinate sexine, and tapetum is covered by orbicules. This taxon is potentially insect pollinated.
    Journal of East African Natural History 09/2010;
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    ABSTRACT: The biodiversity of northern coastal Kenya is poorly understood because security problems and poor infrastructure have discouraged access to the area. However, the wooded areas in the region have great potential for harbouring unique and rare species, including sengis or elephant-shrews (Macroscelidea). Based on recent surveys of the Boni and Dodori National Reserves, which are between the Tana River and the Somali border, the ranges of the rufous sengi (Elephantulus rufescens) and four-toed sengi (Petrodromus tetradactylus) have been extended. Although the golden-ramped sengi (Rhynchocyon chrysopygus) of coastal Kenya south of the lower Tana River was assumed to occur in the Boni forest region, this now appears to be incorrect. The Rhynchocyon east of the lower Tana River is definitely not R. chrysopygus, but rather resembles taxa found hundreds of kilometres to the south. Determining the taxonomic status of what may be a new form of Rhynchocyon will require the collection of voucher specimens and DNA tissues for detailed analyses.
    Journal of East African Natural History 09/2010;