British Poultry Science (BRIT POULTRY SCI )

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

Description

British Poultry Science, established in 1960, is a leading international journal for poultry scientists and advisers to the poultry industry throughout the world. Over 60% of the independently refereed papers published originate outside the UK. Most typically they report the results of studies with an experimental and biological framework which either make an original contribution to fundamental science or are of obvious application to the industry. Subjects which are covered include: anatomy, embryology, biochemistry, biophysics, physiology, reproduction and genetics; behaviour, microbiology, endocrinology, nutrition, environmental science, food science, feeding stuffs and feeding, management and housing welfare, breeding, hatching, poultry meat and egg yields and quality. Papers that adopt a modelling approach or describe the scientific background to new equipment or apparatus directly relevant to the industry are also published. The journal also features rapid publication of Short Communications and Summaries of papers presented at the Spring Meeting of the UK Branch of the WPSA.

  • Impact factor
    1.15
    Show impact factor history
     
    Impact factor
  • 5-year impact
    1.37
  • Cited half-life
    0.00
  • Immediacy index
    0.03
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
    0.37
  • Website
    British Poultry Science website
  • Other titles
    British poultry science (Online)
  • ISSN
    0007-1668
  • OCLC
    39501266
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Taylor & Francis

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author cannot archive a post-print version
  • Restrictions
    • 12 month embargo for STM, Behavioural Science and Public Health Journals
    • 18 month embargo for SSH journals
  • Conditions
    • Some individual journals may have policies prohibiting pre-print archiving
    • Pre-print on authors own website, Institutional or Subject Repository
    • Post-print on authors own website, Institutional or Subject Repository
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • On a non-profit server
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set statements to accompany deposits (see policy)
    • Publisher will deposit to PMC on behalf of NIH authors.
    • STM: Science, Technology and Medicine
    • SSH: Social Science and Humanities
    • 'Taylor & Francis (Psychology Press)' is an imprint of 'Taylor & Francis'
  • Classification
    ​ yellow

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Abstract Two experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of taurine on growth performance, meat quality, oxidative status and muscle taurine content in broilers. In Experiment 1, 50 1-d-old male Cobb chicks were given a diet supplemented with 0, 0.125, 0.50, 2.00 or 8.00 g/kg taurine from 1 to 42 d of age. In Experiment 2, 80 22-d-old male Cobb chicks were given a diet supplemented with 4.00 g/kg taurine for 0, 1, 2 or 3 weeks. Taurine contents of thigh and breast muscle increased linearly with increasing dietary taurine. Taurine supplementation for 1, 2 and 3 weeks significantly increased the taurine content of breast muscle. The taurine contents of liver and thigh meat were significantly increased by taurine supplementation for 3 weeks. The taurine contents of thigh and breast meat from broilers given a diet supplemented with 4 g/kg taurine for 3 weeks increased to 1.89 times the concentrations of the control group. There were no detrimental effects on growth performance, breast or thigh muscle yield, pH value or drip-water loss, and taurine supplementation did not affect the serum carbonyl content. Serum malondialdehyde concentration was significantly decreased by taurine supplementation for 1, 2 or 3 weeks.
    British Poultry Science 07/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract A study was conducted to estimate the prevalence and quantification by species of Campylobacter infection in broiler flocks at the end of the rearing period and to identify associated risk factors. A questionnaire about rearing period was completed and caecal samples were collected from 121 broiler flocks in Brittany, France, during 2008. Campylobacter was isolated in 87 of 121 flocks - a prevalence of 71.9% (95% CI, 63.7-80.1%), including 40.5% of C. jejuni and 29.8% of C. coli. The average concentration, in positive flocks, was 7.96 log10 cfu/g and ranged from 3.15 to 10.32 log10 cfu/g. The average concentration by was: 7.57 log10 cfu/g for C. jejuni and 8.44 log10 cfu/g for C. Coli. There was a seasonal effect, with increased risk of Campylobacter colonisation in June, July and August (Odds ratio (OR) = 9.59, 95% CI 1.15-79.75). The other factors, associated with lower risk of Campylobacter colonisation, were: the acidification of drinking water (OR = 0.33, 95% CI 0.13-0.86), antibiotic treatment at the beginning of rearing period (OR = 0.20, 95% CI 0.07-0.55), and rodent control around the house (OR = 0.18, 95% CI 0.03-0.95). The results show that hygiene practices and biosecurity measures could lead to a reduction in Campylobacter colonisation.
    British Poultry Science 07/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract 1. The present study investigated the effects of dietary supplementation with Gynura procumbens on egg yolk and serum cholesterol and triglycerides, excreta microflora, laying performance and egg quality. 2. A total of 160 Hy-Line Brown layers (45 weeks old) were randomly assigned into 4 treatments on the basis of laying performance. Each treatment had 4 replicates with 10 birds each. 3. Dietary treatments were basal diet supplemented with 0 (control), 2.5, 5.0 and 7.5 g/kg diet G. procumbens during 56 d feeding period. 4. Serum (d 21, 42 and 56) and egg yolk (d 28, 42 and 56) cholesterol and triglycerides concentrations were linearly reduced with increasing dietary concentrations of G. procumbens. 5. Increasing dietary concentrations of G. procumbens linearly reduced the excreta total anaerobic bacteria (d 28), Clostridium sp. and Escherichia coli (d 28 and 56) populations. 6. Overall egg production and egg mass were linearly increased and overall feed efficiency was linearly improved with increase in dietary G. procumbens. 7. Dietary increasing concentrations of G. procumbens linearly improved egg yolk colour (d 28 and 56) and breaking strength of eggs (d 56). 8. The results obtained in the present experiment indicate that dietary supplementation with G. procumbens could reduce the egg yolk cholesterol, suppresses harmful excreta microflora and improve layers performance.
    British Poultry Science 07/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract 1. The present study was conducted to develop Citrus junos probiotics (CJP), using by-products of Citrus junos fermented with multi-species probiotic bacteria including: Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Enterococcus faecium, Lactobacillus acidophilus, and Bacillus subtilis. The effects of dietary CJP on the growth performance, immune status, caecal microbiology and meat oxidative stability of broiler were investigated. 2. A total of 240 d-old Ross broiler chicks were used in a 35 d experiment in which the chicks were randomly allotted to one of the 4 dietary treatments (0g, 5g, 10g and 20g CJP/kg diet) in a completely randomised design. 3. Dietary supplementation of 5g/kg CJP significantly increased body weight (BW), average daily gain (ADG) and average daily feed intake (ADFI) of broiler during the overall experimental period. 4. Serum IgM concentration was significantly increased by 10 g/kg and 20 g/kg CJP, whereas the IgG and IgA concentration remained unaffected. In addition, 20g/kg CJP significantly inhibited proliferation of Escherichia coli without affecting the concentration of Lactobacillus or Bacillus spp. 5. A significant reduction in the TBARS values of breast and thigh meat was observed in response to increasing concentration of dietary CJP. 6. Thus, the results suggest that CJP up to a concentration of 20 g/kg can be used in the diet of broilers to improve immunity, to reduce caecal Escherichia coli and TBARS values of breast and thigh meat without any adverse effects on growth performance.
    British Poultry Science 07/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract 1. The aim of this study was to develop a suitable method for the analysis of florfenicol (FF) and its metabolite florfenicol amine (FFA) in chicken eggs and to determine FF and FFA residue depletion in eggs of laying hens. 2. The analytes were extracted from yolk, albumen, and whole egg by phosphate buffer and ethyl acetate. Following purification, samples were analysed by HPLC. 3. Fifty laying hens were divided into 5 Groups and each hen received doses of 20 mg/kg FF: Group 1 (received a single oral dose by gavage); Group 2 (a single intramuscular dose); Group 3 (a single subcutaneous dose); Group 4 (multiple oral doses for 3 d); and Group 5 (multiple oral doses for 5 d). 4. Limits of detection and of quantitation values were 1.94 and 6.45 g/10(9)g (ppb) for FF, respectively, and 0.48 and 1.58 ppb for FFA, respectively. Relative standard deviation values of intra-day and inter-day variation below 11% also confirmed the usefulness of the method for analysing FF and FFA in eggs. 5. From the first day of both oral and parenteral administration, FF and FFA were detected at 0.1% and 0.08% of dosage, respectively, and 57% of the drugs were eliminated from the egg yolk. Elimination time of FF was 8 d in Groups 1, 2, and 3; 9 d in Group 4; and 10 d in Group 5.
    British Poultry Science 06/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract 1. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of juniper oil on growth performance and meat quality in quails to determine its use as a safe and natural method to reduce overdependence on the use of antibiotic. 2. A total of 1000 1-d-old Pharaoh (Coturnix coturnix Pharaoh) quails, including both males and females, were divided into 4 groups containing 250 quails and treated as follows: (1) a control group with 0 mg volatile oil/kg diet; (2) 100 mg/kg juniper oil; (3) 150 mg/kg juniper oil and (4) 200 mg/kg juniper oil. The diets were prepared fresh for each treatment. The experiment was carried out for 42 d. 3. The results of the study showed that supplementation with juniper oil (100 and 150 mg/kg) caused a significant increase in live weight, live weight gain and carcass yields during the growing and finishing periods. Feed intake and feed conversion rate were not significantly influenced by treatments. 4. The quails given rations containing Juniper oil had reduced thiobarbituric acid levels in raw thigh meat samples at different storage times. Juniper oil was found to have significant antioxidant activity and prevented lipid oxidation in stored meat. 5. In conclusion, natural antioxidants such as a juniper oil can be used instead of synthetic antioxidants to retard lipid oxidation in animal diets to improve meat product quality and animal performance.
    British Poultry Science 06/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: A study of the incidence of chromosome instability in the Japanese quail as assessed by sister chromatid exchange and fragile site identification in chromosomes was conducted in to parent breeds, their F1 and F2 generations. The mean incidence of sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) in the study population was 6.02 ± 0.45 and the frequency of fragile sites was 1.17 ± 0.79. There were moderately negative correlations of 0.51- 0.64 between chromosome instability and fertility in the F1 and 0.10-0.23. The hatch of fertilised eggs was negatively correlated with the number of SCE in male (0.31) and female (0.33) F1 and was lower in P (0.18 and 0.19 respectively) whereas the correlations were similar for the number of fragile sites in both generations (0.51-0.62).
    British Poultry Science 06/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract 1. X-ray Micro Computer Tomography can be used to produce rapid, fully analysable, three-dimensional images of biological and other materials without the need for complex or tedious sample preparation and sectioning. We describe the use of this technique to visualise and analyse the microstructure of fragments of shell taken from three regions of chicken eggs (sharp pole, blunt pole and equatorial region). 2. Two- and three-dimensional images and data were obtained at a resolution of 1.5 microns. The images were analysed to provide measurements of shell thickness, the special density of mammillary bodies, the frequency, shape, volume and effective diameter of individual pore spaces, and the intrinsic sponginess (proportion of non-X-ray dense material formed by vesicles) of the shell matrix. Measurements of these parameters were comparable with those derived by traditional methods and reported in the literature. 3. The advantages of using this technology for the quantification of eggshell microstructural parameters and its potential application for commercial, research and other purposes are discussed.
    British Poultry Science 05/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract A dose-response experiment with 5 dietary threonine concentrations (5.0, 5.8, 6.6, 7.4 and 8.2 g/kg) was conducted to estimate the threonine requirement of White Pekin ducks from hatch to 21 d of age. A total of 240 one-d-old male White Pekin ducks were allotted to 5 experimental treatments and each treatment contained 6 replicate pens with 8 ducks per pen. Ducks were reared in raised wire-floor pens from hatch to 21 d of age. At 21 d of age, growth performance and intestinal morphology were determined. The weight gain and feed intake of Pekin ducks increased and feed/gain of these birds decreased linearly or quadratically as dietary threonine increased from 5.0 to 8.2 g threonine/kg. Compared to ducks fed on diets containing 5.0 g threonine/kg, ducks given diets containing 7.4 g threonine/kg had higher villus height in duodenum, jejunum, and ileum. The threonine requirements for weight gain of White Pekin ducks from hatch to 21 d of age was estimated to be 6.72 g/kg when dietary crude protein concentration was 189.8 g/kg and threonine supply was critical for maintaining intestinal structure of these birds.
    British Poultry Science 05/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract 1. An experiment was set up to study the effects of substrate provision on performance and behaviour in the Pecking and Scratching Area (PSA) of non beak-trimmed hens housed in large furnished cages (60 hens/cage). 2. Three layer hybrids (2 brown and 1 white, ISA-Hendrix Genetics) and two substrate conditions (with or without wheat bran automatically distributed on the PSA) were compared in a 3*2 experimental design with 12 cages per treatment. 3. Substrate distribution improved laying rate with no impact on the frequency of dirty or cracked eggs. 4. Substrate distribution improved the viability and body integrity of hens which were not beak-trimmed. 5. Distribution of substrate tended to increase the number of hens in the PSA and enhanced their pecking and scratching behaviours but had a negative impact on the number of dustbath bouts per cage and encouraged dustbathing on the wire floor close to the feeder. 6. The white hens laid more eggs in the nest than the brown birds and used the PSA more for pecking, scratching and dustbathing at the end of the day than the brown hens, underlining the necessity to adapt cage furnishing and rearing management to specific behaviours of each layer genotype.
    British Poultry Science 05/2014;
  • British Poultry Science 05/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract 1. An experiment was performed to evaluate the effectiveness of the antioxidants curcumin and lutein on the quality of meat from coccidiosis infected broilers. A total of 200 1-d-old Arbor Acre chicks were randomly assigned to a treatment group with five replicates. The treatments included a basal diet without carotenoid supplementation (control), with 300 mg/kg curcumin (CRM), with 300 mg/kg lutein (LTN) or with a combination (C + L) of 150 mg/kg curcumin and 150 mg/kg lutein. All chickens were challenged with Eimeria maxima at 21 d old. 2.The results revealed that the coccidiosis reduced redness of meat, while supplementation with carotenoids improved the fresh meat's redness (a*) and yellowness (b*) and contributed to colour stability maintenance after storage (1 month at -18(°)C and 3 d at 4(°)C). 3. Coccidiosis did not produced lipid and protein oxidation in fresh meat but after storage for one month, the MDA levels and carbonyl contents were lower in the CRM and C + L birds; and the sulfhydryl contents were higher in C + L birds. 4. The SDS-PAGE banding pattern showed equivalent myosin chain fragmentations in all treatment groups, whereas lower intensity actin bands were observed in the control group. Moreover, myofibril protein denaturation (DSC) profiles showed a reduction in the control group myosin and actin peaks. Coccidiosis reduced the meat's water holding capacity in non-supplemented chicken meat and was improved by natural carotenoid. 5.These results emphasise that coccidiosis did not decreased the eating quality of fresh meat, natural carotenoids are efficient antioxidants and that curcumin (300 mg/kg) fed individually or combined with lutein was the most effective supplemented antioxidant compound.
    British Poultry Science 05/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract 1. The objectives of the present study were to estimate heritability and genetic correlations for feed efficiency and body weight in Japanese quail. 2. Recorded tratis during different weeks of the growing period were body weight (BW) from hatch to 35 d, feed intake (FI), feed conversion ratio (FCR) and residual feed intake (RFI) from hatch to 28 d of age. 3. Genetic parameters were estimated by restricted maximum likelihood method using ASREML software. The results showed that heritability estimates for BW ranged from 0.11 to 0.22 and maternal permanent environmental effect was the highest at hatch (0.45). FCR, RFI and FI showed moderate heritabilities ranging from 0.13 to 0.40. 5. Genetic correlations of BW28 with FI0-28 (0.88) and RFI0-28 (0.1) and genetic correlation of FI0-28 with FCR0-28 (0.13) and RFI0-28 (0.52) were positive. A negative genetic correlation was found between BW28 and FCR0-28 (-0.49). There was a high positive genetic correlation (0.67) between RFI0-28 and FCR0-28. 6. In conclusion, selection for increased BW and reduced FI in a selection index could be recommended to improve feed efficiency traits including FCR and RFI in Japanese quail.
    British Poultry Science 05/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract 1. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR) are involved in lipid metabolism through transcriptional regulation of target gene expression. The objective of the current study was to clone and characterise the PPARα and PPARγ genes in the pigeon. 2. The full-length of 1941-bp PPARα and 1653-bp PPARγ were cloned from pigeons. The two genes were predicted to encode 468 and 475 amino acids, respectively. Both proteins contained two C4-type zinc fingers, a nuclear hormone receptor DNA-binding region signature and a HOLI domain, and had high identities with other corresponding avian genes. 3. Using quantitative real-time PCR, pigeon PPARα gene expression was shown to be high in kidney, liver, gizzard, and duodenum whereas PPARγ was predominantly expressed in adipose tissue.
    British Poultry Science 05/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract 1. Differences in growth performance, physicochemical properties and fatty acid composition of breast muscle from water-stressed 16-week old Naked Neck (NNK) and Ovambo (OVB) chickens were investigated. 2. Ovambo chickens had superior (P < 0.05) slaughter weights at 16 weeks of age, average daily weight gain (ADG) and water intake (ADWI) than NNK chickens. Body weights of birds at 16 weeks of age, ADG, average daily feed intake (ADFI), ADWI and water:feed ratio (WFR) declined progressively with increasing severity of water restriction while the opposite was observed for FCR values. Naked Neck chickens had better FCR at the 40% of ad libitum water intake than Ovambo chickens. 3. Meat from NNK chickens had higher redness (a*) values at the 40% of ad libitum water intake but lower lightness (L*) and yellowness (b*) values at 70% of ad libitum and ad libitum water intakes compared with OVB chickens. 4. There was no interaction between strain and water intake on most fatty acids, except for the proportion of elaidic acid (C18: 1t9) higher in meat from NNK compared with OVB chickens fed water at 40% of ad libitum. Water restriction to 40% of ad libitum water intake had a positive influence on the proportions of linoleic acid (C18:2n-6), arachidonic acid (C20:4n-6), adrenic acid (C22:4n-6), docosahexaenoic acid (C22:6n-3), total polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA), total omega-3 PUFA and total omega-6 PUFA proportions, but resulted in lower proportions of total monounsaturated fatty acids compared with 70% of ad libitum and ad libitum water intakes. 5. It was concluded that cooking loss, meat redness values, omega-3 and -6 polyunsaturated fatty acid proportions and n-6/n-3 ratio of Naked Neck chickens improved with increasing severity of water restriction compared with Ovambo chickens.
    British Poultry Science 05/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract 1. A sudy was conducted to test the hypothesis that feed efficiency correlated with the expression of genes from the somatotropic axis and mitochondrial genes involved in energy production, and that the environment to which the birds are exposed influenced the expression of such genes. 2. Quails were divided into high feed efficiency (High-FE) and low feed efficiency (Low-FE) groups and maintained in a comfortable or heat stress (38ºC for 24 h) environment to evaluate changes in insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), growth hormone receptor (GHR), adenine nucleotide translocator (ANT), uncoupling protein (UCP) and cytochrome oxidase subunit III (COX III) mRNA expression in liver and muscle tissues. 3. High-FE quails (0.28 g/g) presented a higher final body weight, greater weight gain, and a better feed conversion ratio than low-FE birds (0.18 g/g). High-FE birds showed greater IGF-I mRNA expression in the liver and muscle and greater GHR mRNA expression in the muscle. 4. Environmental effects only affected GHR expression in the liver, with quails under comfortable conditions exhibiting greater GHR expression than quails subjected to heat stress. 5. There was a significant interaction between feed efficiency and environmental temperature on ANT mRNA expression in the liver. The greatest ANT mRNA expression was observed for high FE-birds that remained under comfortable conditions. 6. In the liver, UCP mRNA expression did not differ among the quails and was not affected by environment or efficiency. However, comparisons of the low- and high-FE birds revealed higher levels of UCP mRNA in the muscle of low-FE birds. 7. COX III mRNA expression in the liver was dependent on environmental temperature and feed efficiency. Higher COX III mRNA expression was observed in animals that remained under comfortable conditions, and high-FE birds exhibited higher expression levels compared to low-FE birds. 8. These results suggest a correlation between IGF-I, GHR, ANT, UCP and COX III gene expression and feed efficiency and that environmental temperature could affect the expression of some of these genes.
    British Poultry Science 05/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract 1. There are no published methods for RNA isolation from avian whole blood where nucleated red blood cells (RBC) prevent the use of established mammalian protocols. The aim of this study was therefore to develop a protocol for total RNA extraction using avian whole blood by defining the effect of anticoagulants and sample purification protocols on RNA yield and quality. 2. Blood collections from the cutaneous ulnar or medial metatarsal veins of birds yielded adequate blood volume (2 to 3 ml) draws. The experiment was a 2 x 2 x 3 factorial arrangement of treatments, with 2 levels of DNase (0 and TURBO DNA-free(TM) Kit), 2 levels of Cleanup (0 and RNeasy MinElute Cleanup Kit), and 3 anticoagulants (no anticoagulant, EDTA, or sodium citrate). 3. RNA was isolated successfully by adding TRIzol LS to 0.25 ml of chicken whole blood at a 3:1 ratio. From 0.125 ml of avian whole blood, 2-3 µg of RNA with RNA integrity number values of 7.75 was successfully isolated with the TRIzol(®) LS extraction and an RNeasy(®) MinElute Cleanup Kit. 4. This reliable protocol can be used to extract high yield and quality of total RNA from a small amount of whole blood.
    British Poultry Science 05/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract 1. The objectives of this study were to compare the hatchability, chick body and internal organs weights and plasma testosterone concentration of hatchlings after in ovo administration of royal jelly (RJ) on d 7 of incubation. 2. Fertile eggs (n =150) were injected into the air sac or yolk sac with 0.5ml normal saline solution or normal saline and pure RJ. The eggs were randomly divided into five groups of 30 eggs each: NC, control eggs receiving no injection; ASA, air sac-injected eggs given normal saline solution; ARJ, air sac-injected eggs injected with pure RJ; YSA, yolk sac-injected eggs receiving normal saline solution; and YRJ, yolk sac-injected eggs given pure RJ. 3. Injection of RJ significantly decreased hatchability (46.7%) compared with injection of SA (68.3%). Hatchability was lower in ARJ (33.3 %) and YRJ (60.0%) groups than in the NC group (90.0%). Hatchability in ASA (70.0%) and YSA (66.66%) groups were comparable to the NC group. 4. In ovo injection of RJ into both sacs increased chicks' absolute and relative body, heart, liver and testes weights compared to the control group whereas plasma testosterone concentration was similar among the different groups. 5. It was concluded that in ovo injection of RJ may be an effective method to increase CWT and chicks' internal organ weights.
    British Poultry Science 05/2014;
  • British Poultry Science 03/2014;

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