Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (ARCH PHYS MED REHAB )

Publisher: American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine; American Congress of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation; American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation; American Society of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Elsevier

Description

Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation has distinguished itself through its coverage of the specialty of physical medicine and rehabilitation and of the more interdisciplinary field of rehabilitation. The journal publishes original articles that report on important trends and developments in these fields. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation brings readers authoritative information on the therapeutic utilization of physical and pharmaceutical agents in providing comprehensive care for persons with disabilities and chronically ill individuals.

Impact factor 2.44

  • Hide impact factor history
     
    Impact factor
  • 5-year impact
    2.81
  • Cited half-life
    9.50
  • Immediacy index
    0.60
  • Eigenfactor
    0.02
  • Article influence
    0.85
  • Website
    Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation website
  • Other titles
    Archives of physical medicine and rehabilitation
  • ISSN
    0003-9993
  • OCLC
    1513891
  • Material type
    Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Journal / Magazine / Newspaper, Internet Resource

Publisher details

Elsevier

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Pre-print allowed on any website or open access repository
    • Voluntary deposit by author of authors post-print allowed on authors' personal website, arXiv.org or institutions open scholarly website including Institutional Repository, without embargo, where there is not a policy or mandate
    • Deposit due to Funding Body, Institutional and Governmental policy or mandate only allowed where separate agreement between repository and the publisher exists.
    • Permitted deposit due to Funding Body, Institutional and Governmental policy or mandate, may be required to comply with embargo periods of 12 months to 48 months .
    • Set statement to accompany deposit
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to journal home page or articles' DOI
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Articles in some journals can be made Open Access on payment of additional charge
    • NIH Authors articles will be submitted to PubMed Central after 12 months
    • Publisher last contacted on 18/10/2013
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This study evaluated whether adding functional exercise training to standard physiotherapy during residential slow stream rehabilitation (SSR) improved discharge outcomes and functional ability. Randomised controlled trial. A regional hospital in Australia. Sixty older people admitted to slow stream rehabilitation. All participants received standard physiotherapy. An individualised functional incidental training (FIT) program was implemented for intervention participants comprising of four extra episodes of functional exercise daily for the period of slow stream rehabilitation. Research assistants visited twice weekly to practise and progress FIT programs. Outcome measures included discharge destination, participant expected discharge destination and functional tests of the Berg Balance Scale (BBS), De Morton Mobility Index (DEMMI) and five times sit to stand test (FTSTS) at admission and discharge. Fifty-two participants completed the study. At baseline, the SSR group achieved higher scores on the BBS, DEMMI and FTSTS. There was no significant difference in discharge destination between groups (p=0.305). The difference in functional change between groups from admission to discharge on the BBS, DEMMI and FTSTS was not significant. Participant expected discharge destination was significantly associated with eventual discharge destination (χ(2)=8.40, df=1, p=0.004). Adding FIT to standard physiotherapy did not improve discharge outcomes and did not have a statistically significant effect on function but may have a small effect on balance. Patient expected and actual discharge destinations were associated. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation 01/2015;
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    ABSTRACT: In order to assess the nature and impact of fatigue and coping with fatigue in the chronic phase after acquired brain injury (ABI), the Dutch Multifactor Fatigue Scale (DMFS) was developed. Its psychometric properties were analyzed in a mixed group of patients with ABI. Cross-sectional, survey study SETTING: Academic Rehabilitation Center PARTICIPANTS: For development of the DMFS: community-dwelling adults with stroke (n=9) and Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) (n=5). For analyses of the psychometric properties of the DMFS: community-dwelling adults with ischemic stroke (n=55), hemorrhagic stroke (n=22) TBI (n=35) or other ABI (n=22), all at least 6 months after brain injury. Not applicable MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S): Dutch Multifactor Fatigue Scale (DMFS), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), Checklist Individual Strength (CIS) and Dutch Personality Questionnaire (NPV2) RESULTS: Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses on data of 134 patients showed that the final DMFS consisted of 5 factors (explaining 55% of variance) that can be labeled Impact of fatigue, Mental fatigue, Signs and Direct consequences, Physical fatigue and Coping with fatigue. All scales of the DMFS showed sufficient to good reliability, good convergent validity with an existing fatigue scale, and good divergent validity with measures of mood and self-esteem. The DMFS is believed to improve the diagnostic process of fatigue in the chronic phase after ABI. Being able to measure several factors of fatigue after brain injury, therapeutic indications can be targeted to patients' needs. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation 01/2015;
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    ABSTRACT: To examine the relationship between gait initiation, fall history and physiological fall risk in individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS) during both cognitive distracting and non-distracting conditions. Single time point cross sectional analysis. University research laboratory. Twenty ambulatory individuals with MS ranging in age from 28 to 76 years. Not applicable MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Gait initiation time was quantified as the time to toe off of the first step following an auditory cue. Gait initiation was performed with and without concurrent cognitive challenge of reciting alternating letters of the alphabet. Additionally, participants underwent a test of fall risk utilizing the physiological profile assessment (PPA) and provided a self-report of number of falls in the previous three months. Gait initiation times ranged from 0.67s to 1.12s during the single task condition and 0.73s to 1.84s during the cognitive challenge condition. PPA scores ranged from -0.80 to 3.87. Participants reported a median of 0.0 falls (IQR = 0.0-2.75) in the previous 3 months. There was a significant correlation between PPA score and gait initiation times only in the cognitive distraction condition (ρ=0.50). There was also a correlation between cognitive distraction gait initiation times and fall history (ρ=0.60). The observations provide preliminary evidence that gait initiation during cognitive challenge may represent a target for fall prevention strategies in MS. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation 01/2015;
  • Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation 01/2015; 96(1):179-80.
  • Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation 01/2015;
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    ABSTRACT: To examine the frequency and factors associated with patients with stroke in Australian hospitals receiving documented rehabilitation assessments; the criteria used when rehabilitation was not recommended; and whether being assessed for rehabilitation affected access to rehabilitation. Retrospective medical record audit of patients with a diagnosis of stroke who were discharged consecutively between 2013 and 2014. 10 acute care public hospitals in Australia. Adults with stroke (n=333) receiving care in the participating hospitals INTERVENTIONS: Not applicable. Documented assessment regarding patient suitability for rehabilitation during the acute hospitalisation. Data from 292 patients were included for analysis (60% male, mean age 72). 42% of patients were assessed for rehabilitation by a health professional providing care in the hospital. 43% of patients were assessed for rehabilitation by a representative from a rehabilitation service. 37% of patients did not receive any documented rehabilitation assessment. In multivariable analysis, patients were significantly more likely to be assessed for rehabilitation if they lived in the community before their stroke, had moderate severity strokes, or received occupational therapy during the hospital admission. Rehabilitation was not recommended in 9% of assessments despite the presence of stroke-related symptoms. Patients not assessed for rehabilitation were significantly less likely to access rehabilitation than patients who were assessed. More than one third of the patients were not assessed for rehabilitation. When assessed, rehabilitation was not consistently recommended for patients with stroke-related symptoms. This study highlights factors that increase the likelihood of being assessed for rehabilitation. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: To determine the inter-rater reliability of the Neuromuscular Recovery Scale (NRS) an outcome measure designed for spinal cord injury (SCI). The scale classifies people with complete or incomplete SCI into four phase of injury groups exhibiting reduced variability in measures of balance, gait speed and walking. The NRS, which assesses motor performance based on normal, pre-injury function disallowing use of compensation, includes 4 treadmill-based items, 6 overground/mat items and an overall rating. Outcomes range from 1-4 with up to 3 subclassifications (A, B, C). Higher ratings reflect greater recovery of normal function. Masked comparison, multi-center observational study SETTING: Outpatient rehabilitation PARTICIPANTS: Fourteen raters and a criterion standard expert assigned scores to 10 video NRS assessments of persons with SCI. The raters were volunteers from the NeuroRecovery Network. Not applicable Main outcome measure: Inter-rater reliability measured with Kendall's coefficient of concordance (W) RESULTS: Inter-rater reliability was generally strong (W: 0.91-0.98; CI: 0.65-0.99) while lower reliability occurred for treadmill stand retraining (W: 0.87; CI: 0.06, 1) and seated trunk extension (W: 0.82; CI: 0.28, 0.94). Less experienced raters assigned slightly lower scores than the expert for most items but the difference was less than half a point and did not weaken concordance. NRS had strong inter-rater reliability, a necessary first step in establishing its utility as a clinical and research outcome measure. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of a novel divided attention task, walking under auditory constraints, on gait performance in older adults, and to determine whether the effect was moderated by cognitive status. Validation Cohort SETTING: General Community PARTICIPANTS: 104 older non-demented and ambulatory older adults INTERVENTIONS: Not applicable MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S): In this pilot study, we evaluated walking under auditory constraints (WUAC) in 104 older adults who completed three pairs of walking trials on a gait mat under one of three randomly assigned conditions: one pair without auditory stimulation, and two pairs with emotionally charged auditory stimulation with happy or sad sounds. The mean age of subjects was 80.6±4.9 years and 63% were women. The mean velocity during normal walking was 97.9±20.6 cm/sec and the mean cadence was 105.1±9.9 steps/min. The effect of walking under auditory constraints on gait characteristics was analyzed using a two factorial ANOVA with a 1-between factor (cognitively intact and minimal cognitive impairment groups) and a 1-within factor (type of auditory stimuli). Under both happy and sad auditory stimulation trials, cognitively intact older adults (n=96) showed an average increase in gait velocity of 2.68 cm/s (F[1.86, 191.71](1, 2)=3.99, p=0.02) and an average increase in cadence of 2.41 steps/min (F[1.75, 180.42]=10.12, p<0.001) compared to trials without auditory stimulation. In contrast, older adults with minimal cognitive impairment (Blessed test score 5-10, n=8) showed average reduction in gait velocity of 5.45 cm/s (F[1.87, 190.83]= 5.62, p=0.005) and in cadence of 3.88 steps/min (F[1.79, 183.10]=8.21, p=0.001) under both auditory stimulation conditions. Neither baseline fall history nor performance on activities of daily living accounted for these differences. Our results provide preliminary evidence of the differentiating effect of emotionally charged auditory stimuli on gait performance in older individuals with minimal cognitive impairment compared to those without. A divided attention task using emotionally charged auditory stimuli might be able to elicit compensatory enhancement in gait performance in cognitively intact older individuals, but lead to decompensation in those with minimal cognitive impairment. Further investigation is needed to compare gait performance with this task to other dual-task paradigms, and separately examine the effects of physiological aging versus cognitive impairment on gait performance under auditory constraints. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: There is substantial interest in mechanisms for measuring, reporting and improving the quality of healthcare, including post-acute care (PAC) and rehabilitation. Unfortunately, current activities generally are either too narrow or to poorly specified to reflect PAC rehabilitation quality of care. In part, this is due to lack of a shared conceptual understanding of what construes "quality of care" in PAC Rehabilitation. This paper presents the PAC-Rehab Quality Framework: an evidence-based conceptual framework articulating elements specifically pertaining to PAC rehabilitation quality of care. The widely recognized Donabedian's SPO (structure, process and outcomes) model furnished the underlying structure for the PAC-Rehab Quality Framework, and the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) framed the functional outcomes. A comprehensive literature review provided the evidence-base to specify elements within the SPO and ICF derived framework. A set of macro-outcomes (functional performance, quality of life of patient and caregivers, consumers experience, place of discharge and healthcare utilization) were defined for PAC rehabilitation, and then related to their: (1) immediate and intermediate outcomes, (2) underpinning care processes, (3) supportive team functioning and improvement processes, and finally the (4) underlying care structures. The role of environmental factors and the centrality of patients in the framework are explicated as well. Finally, we discuss why outcomes may best measure and reflect the quality of PAC rehabilitation. The PAC-Rehab Quality Framework provides a conceptually sound, evidence-based framework appropriate for quality of care activities across the PAC Rehabilitation continuum. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: To identify patient characteristics that influence physiotherapist decisions regarding enrollment and attendance in a structured aerobic exercise program early after stroke. Retrospective chart review. Rehabilitation hospital. Consecutive sample of 345 people admitted to in-patient stroke rehabilitation over a 2 year period. Not applicable. Patient demographics, pre-existing medical conditions, and post-stroke outcome variables (neurological deficit, physical impairment, balance control, and functional mobility and independence) were compared between individuals enrolled and not enrolled in a structured aerobic exercise program. The rate of attendance was calculated for the enrolled group. One hundred and twenty nine patients (38%) were enrolled in the structured aerobic exercise program. Patients who were older (p=0.0093) and had cardiac disease (p=0.012), cardioembolic sources (p=0.0094), and arthritis (p=0.031) were less likely to be enrolled in aerobic exercise. Post-stroke outcome variables were not associated with enrollment. Among those enrolled, the rate of attendance was positively correlated with the FIM(TM) cognitive rating (r=0.27; p=0.0031). Enrollment in structured aerobic exercise programs during in-patient stroke rehabilitation can be limited by safety concerns related to patients' cardiovascular and musculoskeletal status. Barriers associated with the perception of cardiovascular risk factors should be confronted since they do not preclude participation in cardiac rehabilitation. In addition, post-stroke deficits do not limit participation in adapted aerobic exercise early after stroke. It is likely that the characteristics of the structured aerobic exercise program were integral to accommodate the breadth of post-stroke deficits encountered in this study. Future research investigating physiotherapist and practice environment factors that influence the decision to prescribe and implement aerobic exercise is warranted. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: To systematically review the evidence examining effects of walking interventions on pain and self-reported function in individuals with chronic musculoskeletal pain. Six electronic databases (Medline, CINAHL, PsychINFO, PEDro, Sport Discus and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials) were searched from January 1980 up to March 2014. Randomized and quasi-randomized controlled trials in adults with chronic low back pain, osteoarthritis or fibromyalgia comparing walking interventions to a non-exercise or non-walking exercise control group. Data were independently extracted using a standardized form. Methodological quality was assessed using the United States Preventative Services Task Force (USPSTF) system. Twenty-six studies (2384 participants) were included and suitable data from 17 were pooled for meta-analysis with a random effects model used to calculate between group mean differences and 95% confidence intervals. Data were analyzed according to length of follow-up (short-term: ≤8 weeks post randomization; medium-term: >2 months - 12 months; long-term: > 12 months). Interventions were associated with small to moderate improvements in pain at short (mean difference (MD) -5.31, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) -8.06 to -2.56) and medium-term follow-up (MD -7.92, 95% CI -12.37 to -3.48). Improvements in function were observed at short (MD -6.47, 95% CI -12.00 to -0.95), medium (MD -9.31, 95% CI -14.00 to -4.61) and long-term follow-up (MD -5.22, 95% CI 7.21 to -3.23). Evidence of fair methodological quality suggests that walking is associated with significant improvements in outcome compared to control interventions but longer-term effectiveness is uncertain. Using the USPSTF system, walking can be recommended as an effective form of exercise or activity for individuals with chronic musculoskeletal pain but should be supplemented with strategies aimed at maintaining participation. Further work is also required examining effects on important health related outcomes in this population in robustly designed studies. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.
    Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: To assess the feasibility and psychometric properties of eight scales covering two domains of the newly developed Work Disability Functional Assessment Battery (WD-FAB): physical function (PF) and behavioral health (BH) function. Cross-sectional. Community. Adults unable to work due to a physical (n=497) or mental (n=476) disability. None. Each disability group responded to a survey consisting of the relevant WD-FAB scales and existing measures of established validity. The WD-FAB scales were evaluated with regard to data quality (score distribution; percent "I don't know" responses), efficiency of administration (number of items required to achieve reliability criterion; time required to complete the scale) by computerized adaptive testing (CAT), and measurement accuracy as tested by person fit. Construct validity was assessed by examining both convergent and discriminant correlations between the WD-FAB scales and scores on same-domain and cross-domain established measures. Data quality was good and CAT efficiency was high across both WD-FAB domains. Measurement accuracy was very good for the PF scales; BH scales demonstrated more variability. Construct validity correlations, both convergent and divergent, between all WD-FAB scales and established measures were in the expected direction and range of magnitude. The data quality, CAT efficacy, person fit and construct validity of the WD-FAB scales were well supported and suggest that the WD-FAB could be used to assess physical and behavioral health function related to work disability. Variation in scale performance suggests the need for future work on item replenishment and refinement, particularly regarding the Self-Efficacy scale. Copyright © 2014 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: To determine the efficacy of venlafaxine XR for the treatment of pain (secondary aim) in individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) enrolled in an RCT on the efficacy of venlafaxine XR for major depressive disorder (MDD: primary aim). It was hypothesized that venlafaxine XR would be effective for both neuropathic and nociceptive pain. Multi-site, double-blind, randomized (1:1) controlled trial with subjects block randomized and stratified by site, lifetime history of substance abuse and prior history of MDD. Six Departments of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation in University based medical schools. 123 individuals with SCI and major depression between 18 and 64, at least 1 month post-SCI who also reported pain. Twelve-week trial of venlafaxine XR versus placebo using a flexible titration schedule. 0-10 numerical rating scale for pain, pain interference items of the Brief Pain Inventory; 30% and 50% responders. The effect of venlafaxine XR on neuropathic pain was similar to placebo. However venlafaxine XR resulted in statistically significant and clinically meaningful reductions in nociceptive pain site intensity and interference even after controlling for anxiety, depression and multiple pain sites within the same individual. For those who achieved a minimally effective dose of venlafaxine XR, some additional evidence of effectiveness was noted for those with mixed (both neuropathic and nociceptive) pain sites. Venlafaxine XR could complement current medications and procedures for treating pain after SCI and MDD which has nociceptive features. Its usefulness for treating central neuropathic pain is likely to be limited. Research is needed to replicate these findings and determine whether the antinociceptive effect of venlafaxine XR generalizes to persons with SCI pain without MDD. Copyright © 2014 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: To determine if acceleration metrics derived from monitoring outside of treatment are responsive to change in upper extremity (UE) function. The secondary purposes were two-fold: The first was to compare metric values during task-specific training and while in the free-living environment. The second was to establish metric associations with an in-clinic measure of movement capabilities. Before-After Observational Study SETTING: Inpatient Hospital (primary purpose); Outpatient Hospital (secondary purpose) PARTICIPANTS: Individuals (n=8) with UE hemiparesis < 30 days post stroke (primary purpose); Individuals (n=27) with UE hemiparesis > 6 months post stroke (secondary purpose). The inpatient sample was evaluated for UE movement capabilities and monitored with wrist-worn accelerometers for 22 hours outside of treatment before and after multiple sessions of task-specific training. The outpatient sample was evaluated for UE movement capabilities and monitored during a single session of task-specific training and the subsequent 22 hours outside of clinical settings. Action Research Arm Test and acceleration metrics quantified from accelerometer recordings. Five metrics improved in the inpatient sample, along with UE function as measured on the ARAT: use ratio, magnitude ratio, variation ratio, median paretic UE acceleration magnitude, and paretic UE acceleration variability. Metric values were greater during task-specific training than in the free-living environment, and each metric was strongly associated with ARAT score. Multiple metrics that characterize different aspects of UE movement are responsive to change in function. Metric values are different during training than in the free-living environment, providing further evidence that what the paretic UE does in the clinic may not generalize to what it does in everyday life. Copyright © 2014 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: To assess lifetime prevalence of seven chronic health conditions (CHCs) among a cohort of adults with chronic traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI). Cross-sectional SETTING: A large rehabilitation hospital in the Southeastern United States. Adults with SCI who were (1) ≥18 years of age, (2) ≥ one year post-injury, and (3) had residual neurological effects impeding full recovery (n=1,678). Not applicable. CHCs were measured using questions from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System for: diabetes (not including gestational); heart attack, also called a myocardial infarction; angina or coronary heart disease; stroke, high blood pressure (not including during pregnancy); high blood cholesterol; or cancer. Of participants, 49.5% reported having at least one CHC, with 23.2% reporting 2+. The most frequently reported CHC was high cholesterol (29.3%), followed by hypertension (28.7%) and diabetes (11.8%). While the prevalence of CHCs significantly increased with increasing age, only hypertension and cancer were significantly associated with years post-injury. Four CHCs (diabetes, coronary heart disease, hypertension, high cholesterol) were significantly related to mobility status as measured by injury level and ambulatory status. However, after controlling for age, years post-injury, gender, and race, mobility status became non-significant in relation to coronary heart disease but remained significantly associated with diabetes, hypertension, and high cholesterol. Clinicians should be aware of the risk of CHC in persons with SCI and should screen for these conditions as well as regular maintenance activities related to SCI. Copyright © 2014 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: To describe extent to which adherence to Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) Statement in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in adult traumatic brain injury (TBI) has improved over time. MedLine, PsycINFO and CINAHL databases were searched from inception to September, 2013. Primary report of randomized controlled trials in adult traumatic brain injury. The quality of reporting on CONSORT checklist items was examined and compared over time. Study selection was conducted by 2 researchers independently. Any disagreements were solved by discussion. Two reviewers independently conducted data extraction based on a set of structured data extraction forms. Data regarding the publication years, size, locations, participation centers, intervention types, intervention groups and CONSORT checklist items were extracted from the including trials. Of 105 trials reviewed, 38.1%, 5.7% and 32.4% investigated drugs, surgical procedures and rehabilitations as the intervention of interest, respectively. Among reports published between 2002-2010 (n=51) and 2011-September, 2013 (n=16), median sample size was 99 and 118; 39.2% and 37.5% detailed implementation of randomization process; 60.8% and 43.8% of all reports provided information on method of allocation concealment; 56.9% and 31.3% stated how blinding was achieved; 15.7% and 43.8% reported information regarding trial registration and only 2.0% and 6.3% stated where full trial protocol could be accessed, respectively. Reporting of several important methodological aspects of RCTs conducted in adult TBI population improved over years; however, quality of reporting remains below an acceptable level. The small sample sizes suggest that many RCTs are likely underpowered. Further improvement is recommended in designing and reporting RCTS. Copyright © 2014 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: To determine if normalising spatial-temporal gait data for walking speed when obtained from multiple walking trials leads to differences in gait variability parameters associated with a history of falling in transtibial amputees. Cross-sectional study of transtibial amputees with and without histories of falling in the past 12 months. Rehabilitation centre. Forty-five unilateral transtibial amputees (35 male, age 60.5 (SD13.7) years) were recruited. Participants completed 10 consecutive walking trials over an instrumented walkway. Primary gait parameters were walking speed and step-length, step-width, step-time, and swing-time variability. Participants provided a retrospective 12-month falls history. Sixteen (36%) amputees were classified as fallers. Variation in gait speed across the 10 walking trials was 2.9% (range 1.1%-12.1%). Variability parameters of normalised gait data were significantly different to variability parameters of non-normalised data (all p<0.01). For non-normalised data, fallers had greater amputated limb step-time (p=0.02), step-length (p=0.02), swing-time (p=0.05), step-width (p=0.03) variability and non-amputated limb step-length (p=0.04) and step-width (p=0.01) variability. For normalised data only three variability parameters remained significantly greater for fallers. These were amputated limb step-time (p=0.05), step-length (p=0.02), and step-width (p=0.01) variability. Normalising spatial-temporal gait data for walking speed before calculating gait variability parameters may aid in discerning the variability parameters related to falls history in transtibial amputees. This may help focus initial rehabilitation efforts of amputee patients with falls history. Copyright © 2014 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation 12/2014;