Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (ARCH PHYS MED REHAB)

Publisher: American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine; American Congress of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation; American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation; American Society of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

Journal description

Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation has distinguished itself through its coverage of the specialty of physical medicine and rehabilitation and of the more interdisciplinary field of rehabilitation. The journal publishes original articles that report on important trends and developments in these fields. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation brings readers authoritative information on the therapeutic utilization of physical and pharmaceutical agents in providing comprehensive care for persons with disabilities and chronically ill individuals.

Current impact factor: 2.44

Impact Factor Rankings

2015 Impact Factor Available summer 2015
2013 / 2014 Impact Factor 2.441
2012 Impact Factor 2.358
2011 Impact Factor 2.282
2010 Impact Factor 2.254
2009 Impact Factor 2.184
2008 Impact Factor 2.159
2007 Impact Factor 1.814
2006 Impact Factor 1.826
2005 Impact Factor 1.734
2004 Impact Factor 1.656
2003 Impact Factor 1.35
2002 Impact Factor 1.327
2001 Impact Factor 1.371
2000 Impact Factor 1.409
1999 Impact Factor 1.134
1998 Impact Factor 1.078
1997 Impact Factor 1.078
1996 Impact Factor 1.315
1995 Impact Factor 1.084
1994 Impact Factor 1.041
1993 Impact Factor 0.738
1992 Impact Factor 0.718

Impact factor over time

Impact factor
Year

Additional details

5-year impact 2.81
Cited half-life 9.50
Immediacy index 0.60
Eigenfactor 0.02
Article influence 0.85
Website Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation website
Other titles Archives of physical medicine and rehabilitation
ISSN 0003-9993
OCLC 1513891
Material type Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Journal / Magazine / Newspaper, Internet Resource

Publisher details

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Abstract Objective To determine the effectiveness of functional electrical stimulation (FES) on drop foot in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), using data from standard clinical practice. Design Case series with a consecutive sample of FES users collected between 2008 and 2013. Setting Specialist FES center at a district general hospital. Participants Patients with MS who have drop foot (N=187) (117 women, 70 men; mean age, 55y [range, 27–80y]; mean duration since diagnosis, 11.7y [range, 1–56y]). A total of 166 patients were still using FES after 20 weeks, with 153 patients completing the follow-up measures. Interventions FES of the common peroneal nerve (178 unilateral, 9 bilateral FES users). Main Outcome Measures Clinically meaningful changes (ie, >.05m/s and >0.1m/s) and functional walking category derived from 10-m walking speed. Results An increase in walking speed was found to be highly significant (P<.001), both initially where a minimum clinically meaningful change was observed (.07m/s) and after 20 weeks with a substantial clinically meaningful change (.11m/s). After 20 weeks, treatment responders displayed a 27% average improvement in their walking speed. No significant training effect was found. Overall functional walking category was maintained or improved in 95% of treatment responders. Conclusions FES of the dorsiflexors is a well-accepted intervention that enables clinically meaningful changes in walking speed, leading to a preserved or an increased functional walking category.
    Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation 04/2015; 96(4):667.
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    ABSTRACT: To investigate whether the concomitant presence of anterior cervical osteophytes (ACOs) can influence the severity and outcome in those with post-stroke dysphagia. Retrospective case-control study. University-affiliated hospital-based study. Post-stroke dysphagia patients with ACOs (n=20) were identified and matched by age, gender, location and laterality of the stroke lesion to a post-stroke dysphagia control group with no ACOs (n=20). Not applicable. Videofluoroscopic swallowing study results, the Functional Oral Intake Scale (FOIS) and the Penetration-Aspiration Scale (PAS) assessed within the first month of stroke were analyzed. FOIS at 6 months were recorded, and severity of dysphagia was compared between the 2 groups. The case group had larger degrees of post-swallow residues in the valleculae and pyriform sinuses (P=.020, P<.001) with more patients showing post-swallow aspiration (62.5%) than the control group (0%) (P<.001), along with a higher risk of being on enteral nutrition feeding (OR=13.933; 95% CI, 2.863-Infinity) within the first month of stroke. At the 6-month follow-up, the case group had significantly lower mean FOIS score (3.8±1.7) than the control group (6.1±1.3) (P<.001) with increased risk of having persistent dysphagia (OR=15.375; 95% CI, 3.195-Infinity). The presence of ACOs, which may cause mechanical obstruction and interfere with residue clearance at the valleculae and pyriform sinuses and result in more post-swallow aspiration, may influence initial severity and outcome of post-stroke dysphagia. The presence of ACOs may be considered as important clinical condition that may affect post-stroke dysphagia rehabilitation. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation 03/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.apmr.2015.02.026
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    ABSTRACT: To investigate the relation between mental health and disability after a road traffic crash (RTC) up to 24 months for claimants with predominantly minor injuries in an Australian sample.
    Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation 03/2015; 96(3):410-417. DOI:10.1016/j.apmr.2014.10.007
  • Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation 03/2015; 96(3):565-566. DOI:10.1016/j.apmr.2014.02.012
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate the feasibility of brain-computer interface (BCI)-assisted motor imagery training to support hand/arm motor rehabilitation after stroke during hospitalization. Proof-of-principle study. Neurorehabilitation hospital. Convenience sample of patients (N=8) with new-onset arm plegia or paresis caused by unilateral stroke. The BCI-based intervention was administered as an "add-on" to usual care and lasted 4 weeks. Under the supervision of a therapist, patients were asked to practice motor imagery of their affected hand and received as a discrete feedback the movements of a "virtual" hand superimposed on their own. Such a BCI-based device was installed in a rehabilitation hospital ward. Following a user-centered design, we assessed system usability in terms of motivation, satisfaction (by means of visual analog scales), and workload (National Aeronautics and Space Administration-Task Load Index). The usability of the BCI-based system was also evaluated by 15 therapists who participated in a focus group. All patients successfully accomplished the BCI training. Significant positive correlations were found between satisfaction and motivation (P=.001, r=.393). BCI performance correlated with interest (P=.027, r=.257) and motivation (P=.012, r=.289). During the focus group, professionals positively acknowledged the opportunity offered by BCI-assisted training to measure patients' adherence to rehabilitation. An ecological BCI-based device to assist motor imagery practice was found to be feasible as an add-on intervention and tolerable by patients who were exposed to the system in the rehabilitation environment. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation 03/2015; 96(3):S71 S78. DOI:10.1016/j.apmr.2014.05.026
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    ABSTRACT: To quantify improvements in walking performance commonly observed in patients with Multiple Sclerosis (pwMS). A systematic literature search and meta-analysis was conducted quantifying the expected benefits of exercise on walking ability in pwMS. Potential studies were identified by systematic search using PubMed (1966 to 31(st) March, 2014), EMBASE (1974 to 31(st) March, 2014), CINAHL (1998 to 31(st) March, 2014), SPORTSDiscus (1991-31(st) March, 2014) and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (1966 to 31(st) March, 2014). The search used key concepts of "Multiple Sclerosis" AND "exercise". Randomised controlled trials of exercise training in adult patients with MS. Data on patient and study characteristics; walking ability; 10metre walk test (10mWT); Timed 25-foot walk test (T25FW); 2 minute walk test (2MWT); 6 minute walk test (6MWT); Timed up and go (TUG) were extracted and archived. Data from 13 studies were included. Exercise produced significant improvements in walking speed, measured by 10mWT, mean difference (MD) reduction in walking time of -1.76 seconds (95%CI -2.47 to -1.06, p<0.001), but no change in the T25FW MD = -0.59s (95%CI -2.55 to 1.36, p=0.55). Exercise produced significant improvements in walking endurance as measured by 6MWT and 2MWT, with increased walking distance of MD=36.46 metres (95%CI 15.14 to 57.79, P<0.001) and MD=12.51 metres (95%CI 4.79 to 20.23, p=0.001), respectively. No improvement was found for TUG MD = -1.05s (95% CI -2.19 to 0.09, p=0.07). Our meta-analysis suggests exercise improves walking speed and endurance in pwMS. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation 02/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.apmr.2015.02.011
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    ABSTRACT: To investigate environmental barriers reported by stroke survivors in rural Chinese villages, and to determine the relative impact of environmental barriers on activity and participation compared with socio-demographic characteristics and body functioning. Cross-sectional survey. Structured interviews in the participants' homes. Community-dwelling stroke survivors in the rural areas of China (N=639). Not applicable. Activity and participation (Chinese version of the WHO's Disability Assessment Schedule 2.0), environmental barriers (Craig Hospital Inventory of Environmental Factors), neurological function (Canadian Neurological Scale), cognitive function (Abbreviated Mental Test), depression (Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression-6). Physical/structural barriers are the major impediment to activity and participation for these subjects(OR=1.86 in activity and 1.99 in participation, P<0.01). Services/assistance barriers primarily impede participation rather than activity(OR=1.58 in participation, P<0.05). Physical/structural and services/assistance barriers were considered the dominant barriers to activity and participation for the stroke survivors in the rural areas of China. Attitudinal/support and policy barriers did not emerge as serious concerns. To generate an enabling environment, physical/structural and service/assistance barriers are the environmental barriers to be decreased and eliminated first. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation 02/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.apmr.2015.01.024
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    ABSTRACT: To present an evidence-based overview of the effectiveness of medical rehabilitation intervention in natural disaster survivors and outcomes that are affected. A literature search was conducted using medical and health science electronic databases (PubMed, Medline, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Library) up to September 2014. Two independent reviewers selected studies reporting outcomes for natural disaster survivors following medical rehabilitation that addressed functional restoration and participation. Two reviewers independently extracted data and assessed the methodological quality of the studies using Critical Appraisal Skills Program's (CASP) appraisal tools. A meta-analysis was not possible due to heterogeneity amongst included trials, therefore a narrative analysis was performed for best evidence synthesis. Ten studies (2 randomised controlled trials, 8 observational studies) investigated a variety of medical rehabilitation interventions for natural disaster survivors to evaluate "best" evidence to date. The interventions ranged from comprehensive multidisciplinary rehabilitation to community educational programs. Studies scored low on quality assessment due to methodological limitations. The findings suggest 'some' evidence for the effectiveness of inpatient rehabilitation in reducing disability, improving participation and quality of life; and for community-based rehabilitation for participation. There was no data available for associated costs. The findings highlight the need to incorporate medical rehabilitation into response planning and disaster management for future natural catastrophes. Access to rehabilitation and investment in sustainable infrastructure and education is crucial. More methodologically robust studies are needed to build evidence for rehabilitation programs, cost-effectiveness and outcome measurement in such settings. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation 02/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.apmr.2015.02.007
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    ABSTRACT: To explore the effect of an evidence-based mobility intervention on level of function (LOF) achieved by intracerebral (ICH) and subarachnoid hemorrhagic (SAH) stroke patients and identify clinical characteristics and measures associated with walking distances greater than 50 feet. Retrospective pre- and post-intervention study. Regional neurointensive care unit (Neuro ICU). Adult ICH and SAH patients (n=361). Daily mobility intervention based on patient current level of function. Walking greater than 50 feet (LOF 5) by Neuro ICU discharge. Electronic health records (EHR) for 361 patients (52.6% women, mean age=62.1 years, intracerebral hemorrhagic stroke=63.2%, aphasia=35%, hemiplegia=33%) were included. There was a 2.3-fold increase in hemorrhagic stroke patients achieving LOF 5 feet by Neuro ICU discharge following introduction of a mobility intervention. In the multivariable logistic regression (LR) model including Neuro ICU length of stay (LOS) as a covariate, the intervention, a LOF 5 at admission, subarachnoid hemorrhage stroke type, third (vs. lowest) quartile of Neuro ICU LOS, and absence of aphasia and/or hemiplegia were associated with higher likelihood of achieving LOF 5 (OR [95% CI] of 5.28 [2.52-11.06], 6.02 [1.45-24.96], 3.78 [1.83-7.80], 2.94 [1.16-7.47], and 17.77 [6.59-47.92], respectively. A mobility intervention was strongly associated with increased distance walked by acute hemorrhagic Neuro ICU patients at discharge, and can be applied in any ICU setting to promote stroke recovery. Future studies directed at building predictive models for walking achievement in acute hemorrhagic stroke patients may provide insight into individualized treatment goal setting and discharge planning. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation 02/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.apmr.2015.02.008
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    ABSTRACT: This study aimed to explore major patient and provider characteristics influencing the receipt of physical therapy (PT) among patients newly diagnosed with osteoarthritis. A population-based cross-sectional study on outpatient PT for patients newly diagnosed with osteoarthritis within the period 2005-2010. The study was conducted using a nationally representative sample of one million National Health Insurance enrollees in Taiwan in 2005. People aged 18 years and older with an incidence of osteoarthritis and receiving initial outpatient treatment. The outcome variable of interest was the probability of receiving PT within 1 year of osteoarthritis diagnosis. Both individual and provider characteristics were investigated to determine their influence on PT receipt. Of the 29012 included osteoarthritis patients, only 24.8% of them received PT within the first year of diagnosis. Men and elderly patients were less likely to receive PT. In addition, low-income osteoarthritis patients were less likely to receive PT. Furthermore, PT receipt was increased in patients treated by female physicians and by physicians who specialized in rehabilitation medicine. In addition, we observed a pattern indicating that the lower the accreditation level of the practice setting is, the greater the probability of PT being received. Because of the National Health Insurance program in Taiwan, direct medical costs of PT have been substantially reduced; however, variations are still observed among different patient and provider characteristics. The major role of providers in PT receipt for osteoarthritis patients should not be ignored. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation 02/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.apmr.2015.02.006
  • Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation 02/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.apmr.2014.11.023
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    ABSTRACT: This study compared the reciprocal control of agonist and antagonist muscles in individuals with and without spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA) and evaluated the effect of a 4-week leg cycling regimen on functional coordination and reciprocal control of agonist and antagonist muscles in patients with SCA. Randomized controlled trial with repeated measures. Research laboratory in a general hospital. Individuals with SCA (n= 20) and without SCA (n=20). A single 15-minute session of leg cycling and a 4-week cycling regimen. Individuals with SCA (n= 20) and without SCA (n=20) underwent disynaptic reciprocal inhibition and D1 inhibition tests of soleus muscles before and after a single 15-minute cycling session. Individuals with SCA were randomly assigned to either participate in 4 weeks of cycling training (n=10) or to receive no training (n=10). The disynaptic reciprocal inhibition and D1 inhibition and International Cooperative Ataxia Rating Scale (ICARS) scores were evaluated in both groups after 4 weeks. Individuals with SCA showed abnormally strong resting values of disynaptic reciprocal inhibition and D1 inhibition (p<0.001) and impaired inhibition modulation capacity after a single 15-minute session of cycling (p<0.001). The inhibition modulation capacity was restored (p<0.001) and the ICARS scores improved significantly (pre: 13.5±9.81, post:11.3±8.74, p=0.046) after 4 weeks of cycling training. A 4-week cycling regimen can normalize the modulation of reciprocal inhibition and functional performance in individuals with SCA. These findings are applicable to the coordination training of patients. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation 02/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.apmr.2015.01.021
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    ABSTRACT: To assess changes in participation in society (frequency, restrictions, satisfaction) during and after cardiac rehabilitation (CR). Secondary aim was to assess associations between participation and quality of life (HRQoL). Prospective cohort study. Outpatient cardiac rehabilitation center. Patients with diagnosis of coronary artery disease (CAD, n=121; 57 years; 80% men). Multi-disciplinary CR MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Participation in society was assessed with the Utrecht Scale for Evaluation of Rehabilitation-Participation and HRQoL with the MacNew heart disease health-related quality of life questionnaire. All measurements were performed pre-CR, post-CR, and one year after start of CR. Frequency of participation did not change during and after CR. The proportion of patients experiencing restrictions in participation decreased from 69% Pre-CR to 40% post-CR (p<0.001) and 29% at one year (p<0.001, versus post-CR). Pre-CR, 71% of patients were dissatisfied with their participation. This improved to 49% post-CR (p<0.001) and 53% at one year (p<0.001, versus pre-CR). Experienced restrictions explained 5-7% of improvement in HRQoL during CR and satisfaction with participation explained 10-19%. Participation in society improves in patients undergoing CR. Despite these improvements, the presence of CAD is associated with persistent restrictions and dissatisfaction with participation. Since experienced restrictions and dissatisfaction are related to changes in HRQoL, it is important to address these aspects of participation during CR. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation 02/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.apmr.2015.01.019