Transactions of the American Fisheries Society (T AM FISH SOC )

Publisher: American Fisheries Society, American Fisheries Society

Description

The Society's highly regarded international journal of fisheries science has been published continuously since 1872. It features results of basic and applied research in genetics, physiology, biology, ecology, population dynamics, economics, health, culture, and other topics germane to marine and freshwater finfish and shellfish and their respective fisheries and environments. Available in print and electronic formats.

Impact factor 1.31

  • Hide impact factor history
     
    Impact factor
  • 5-year impact
    1.87
  • Cited half-life
    0.00
  • Immediacy index
    0.31
  • Eigenfactor
    0.01
  • Article influence
    0.60
  • Website
    Transactions of the American Fisheries Society website
  • Other titles
    Transactions of the American Fisheries Society
  • ISSN
    0002-8487
  • OCLC
    6445080
  • Material type
    Conference publication, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Journal / Magazine / Newspaper, Internet Resource

Publisher details

American Fisheries Society

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author cannot archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • On open access repositories
    • Publisher's version/PDF must be used
    • Now published by Taylor & Francis
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • Transactions of the American Fisheries Society 01/2015;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Restoration of oyster reefs is increasing worldwide due to oyster populations reaching historic lows and recognition of the many ecosystem services provided by oyster reefs, such as essential fish habitat. This study took advantage of an existing network of subtidal oyster reefs and a large-scale oyster reef restoration effort in Pamlico Sound, North Carolina, to (1) compare estuarine fish assemblages on oyster reefs with those on unstructured bottom, (2) identify the short-term change in fish abundance and richness in response to reef creation, and (3) identify spatiotemporal trends in fish abundance and richness. We quantified transient and reef fish using gill nets and fish traps, respectively. Oyster reefs harbored more unique species than unstructured bottom, thereby enhancing the overall diversity of estuarine fish assemblages. Fish abundance on recently created experimental reefs (6–8 months postconstruction) was similar to that on control reefs that were 4–6 years old, suggesting rapid colonization of new reefs. Fish diversity at 1 of 2 sites actually decreased on control reefs after reef construction, suggesting that rapid colonization of new reefs was due, in part, to the movement of fish from old to new reefs. Information on the distribution, abundance, and diversity of estuarine fish in relation to restored oyster reefs will improve our understanding of oyster reefs as essential fish habitat.Received June 12, 2013; accepted September 14, 2013
    Transactions of the American Fisheries Society 12/2014; 143(1).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Models based on simple air temperature–water temperature relationships have been useful in highlighting potential threats to coldwater-dependent species such as Brook Trout Salvelinus fontinalis by predicting major losses of habitat and substantial reductions in geographic distribution. However, spatial variability in the relationship between changes in air temperature to changes in water temperature complicates predictions. We directly measured paired summer air and water temperatures over 2 years in a stratified representative sample of watersheds (2) supporting wild Brook Trout throughout Virginia near the southern edge of the species distribution. We used the temperature data to rank streams in terms of two important components of habitat vulnerability: sensitivity (predicted change in water temperature per unit increase in air temperature) and exposure (predicted frequency, magnitude, and duration of threshold water temperatures). Across all sites, sensitivity was substantially lower (median sensitivity = 0.35°C) than the 0.80°C assumed in some previous models. Median sensitivity across all sites did not differ between the 2 years of the study. In contrast, median exposure was considerably greater in 2010 (a particularly warm summer) than in 2009, but exposure ranks of habitat patches were highly consistent. Variation in sensitivity and exposure among habitat patches was influenced by landscape metrics (percent forested riparian corridor, patch area, and elevation), but considerable unexplained variation in sensitivity and exposure among sites was likely due to local-scale differences in the extent of groundwater influence. Overall, our direct measurement approach identified significantly more Brook Trout habitat patches with low sensitivity and low exposure that may persist under warming air temperatures than did previous large-scale models. Our sensitivity and exposure classification should provide a useful general framework for managers in making investment decisions for protecting and restoring Brook Trout habitat.Received September 2, 2011; accepted August 9, 2013
    Transactions of the American Fisheries Society 12/2014; 143(1).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The Pallid Sturgeon Scaphirhynchus albus is an endangered riverine sturgeon with historical distribution restricted to the Yellowstone, Missouri, Mississippi, and Atchafalaya rivers. Although not abundant, Pallid Sturgeon in the lower Mississippi River appear to be naturally recruiting, and information about habitat use is important to conserve this species. Thirty-four adult Pallid Sturgeon (612–1,013-mm FL) were tagged with acoustic transmitters and relocated a total of 272 times in a 40-km reach of the lower Mississippi River from April 2009 through December 2012. Pallid Sturgeon strongly selected island tip and natural bank habitats, and, to a lesser degree, revetted bank habitat. Although frequently used, Pallid Sturgeon exhibited negative selection for the expansive main channel habitat. Secondary channel habitat was seasonally available and excluded from habitat selection analysis, but this habitat was frequently used in the spring when available. Fifty percent of Pallid Sturgeon detections were in relatively narrow ranges of depths (6.2–13.6 m) and surface current velocities (0.64–1.05 m/s). Use of different habitats was related to river stage and water temperature, suggesting use of some habitats was seasonal. Results suggest that maintaining natural bank habitat and secondary channel–island complexes will benefit conservation of this endangered species in the lower Mississippi River.Received April 12, 2012; accepted July 29, 2013
    Transactions of the American Fisheries Society 12/2014; 143(1).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Steelhead Oncorhynchus mykiss are the most widespread of the Pacific salmonids Oncorhynchus spp. and are found in nearly all basins within their native range around the northern Pacific Rim. Here, we elucidate genetic population structure of steelhead in coastal basins from most of their coastal-California range using variation at 15 microsatellite loci. Juvenile fish from 60 streams in 40 river basins were sampled in a single year from a single cohort. As samples of juvenile salmonids often contain sibling groups, a method was implemented to identify and eliminate all but one member of larger sibships. This, in conjunction with a rigorous sampling protocol and hierarchical sampling design, provided substantially improved resolution for understanding patterns of migration and demography. A pattern of isolation by distance was evident, as indicated by both phylograms that were largely concordant with geography and a significant regression of genetic distance on geographic distance, indicating that population structure is largely determined by migration that is dependent upon geographic distance. Within-basin genetic distances tended to be smaller than those between basins, although there was substantial overlap between them. Using a Bayesian clustering method to evaluate signals of population structure above the level of a river basin, four geographic sites were identified where genetic composition shifted abruptly. These areas largely correspond to major geographic features of the coastline: San Francisco and Humboldt bays and two extended sections of coast (the so-called Lost Coast and Russian Gulch areas) with no streams reaching inland more than several kilometers. Only one of these boundaries is concordant with the current delineation of steelhead Distinct Population Segments designated under the U.S. Endangered Species Act. Finally, there was a strong correlation between latitude and genetic variation, with fewer alleles present in the south, a pattern consistent with generally smaller population sizes in the south.Received January 8, 2013; accepted June 27, 2013
    Transactions of the American Fisheries Society 12/2014; 143(1).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This study examined 23 years of egg size data from a population entirely made up of hatchery-maintained fall Chinook Salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytschain Lake Oahe, South Dakota. Egg size data, obtained by water-displacement during hatchery egg inventories, ranged from 4.2 to 6.6 eggs/mL over the 23 years. However, linear regression of data from either pooled lots of eggs (y = 0.0035x – 1.8116; P = 0.727) or individual spawns (y = 0.0003x + 5.3037; P = 0.907) indicated no significant change in mean egg size over time. The lack of change in egg size of Lake Oahe fall Chinook Salmon over the 23 years of this study indicates there was no hatchery-induced evolutionary impacts on egg size.Received July 26, 2013; accepted September 6, 2013
    Transactions of the American Fisheries Society 12/2014; 143(1).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In the Blackfoot basin of western Montana, the recovery of migratory Westslope Cutthroat Trout Oncorhynchus clarkii lewisi requires landscape conservation as well as restoration of spawning tributaries. Westslope Cutthroat Trout are now increasing in the Blackfoot River and several streams, including Nevada Spring Creek, where natural channel, flow, and temperature regimes have reestablished aquatic habitat and migration corridors. To examine whether restoration has improved corridors for migration, we tracked the movements of 14 adult Westslope Cutthroat Trout from wintering areas in lower Nevada Creek (downstream of Nevada Spring Creek) to spawning and summering areas. Ten fish moved through Nevada Spring Creek upstream a median distance of 7.7 km (range, 7.6–16.9) to spawning sites at the headwaters of Wasson Creek through stream reaches where channels were reconstructed, instream flows enhanced, and grazing practices improved. Eight of the 10 fish that entered Wasson Creek spawned in a concentrated area upstream of two experimental diversion–fish screen structures located in the main channel of Wasson Creek. Prespawning movements of the remaining four radio-tagged fish were much farther than those of Wasson Creek spawners (median, 51.8 km; range, 44.9–63.1). These four fish moved downstream through Nevada Creek into the Blackfoot River and then ascended upper Blackfoot River before entering two separate spawning tributaries. This telemetry study indicates that restoration can improve migration corridors which, in turn, promote the recovery of migratory Westslope Cutthroat Trout, and that spring-influenced tributaries like Nevada Spring Creek provide important overwinter habitat for Westslope Cutthroat Trout that spawn and summer elsewhere in the basin.Received June 7, 2013; accepted August 27, 2013
    Transactions of the American Fisheries Society 12/2014; 143(1).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The predictive power of recruitment models often relies on the identification and quantification of external variables, in addition to stock size. In theory, the identification of climatic, biotic, or demographic influences on reproductive success assists fisheries management by identifying factors that have a direct and reproducible influence on the population dynamics of a target species. More often, models are constructed as one-time studies of a single population whose results are not revisited when further data become available. Here, we present results from stock recruitment models for Alewife Alosa pseudoharengus and Bloater Coregonus hoyi in Lakes Michigan and Huron. The factors that explain variation in Bloater recruitment were remarkably consistent across populations and with previous studies that found Bloater recruitment to be linked to population demographic patterns in Lake Michigan. Conversely, our models were poor predictors of Alewife recruitment in Lake Huron but did show some agreement with previously published models from Lake Michigan. Overall, our results suggest that external predictors of fish recruitment are difficult to discern using traditional fisheries models, and reproducing the results from previous studies may be difficult particularly at low population sizes.Received March 22, 2013; accepted August 6, 2013
    Transactions of the American Fisheries Society 12/2014; 143(1).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Understanding local and geographic factors influencing species distributions is a prerequisite for conservation planning. Our objective in this study was to model local and geographic variability in elevations occupied by native and nonnative trout in the northwestern Great Basin, USA. To this end, we analyzed a large existing data set of trout presence (5,156 observations) to evaluate two fundamental factors influencing occupied elevations: climate-related gradients in geography and local constraints imposed by topography. We applied quantile regression to model upstream and downstream distribution elevation limits for each trout species commonly found in the region (two native and two nonnative species). With these models in hand, we simulated an upstream shift in elevation limits of trout distributions to evaluate potential consequences of habitat loss. Downstream elevation limits were inversely associated with latitude, reflecting regional gradients in temperature. Upstream limits were positively related to maximum stream elevation as expected. Downstream elevation limits were constrained topographically by valley bottom elevations in northern streams but not in southern streams, where limits began well above valley bottoms. Elevation limits were similar among species. Upstream shifts in elevation limits for trout would lead to more habitat loss in the north than in the south, a result attributable to differences in topography. Because downstream distributions of trout in the north extend into valley bottoms with reduced topographic relief, trout in more northerly latitudes are more likely to experience habitat loss associated with an upstream shift in lower elevation limits. By applying quantile regression to relatively simple information (species presence, elevation, geography, topography), we were able to identify elevation limits for trout in the Great Basin and explore the effects of potential shifts in these limits that could occur in response to changing climate conditions that alter streams directly (e.g., through changes in temperature and precipitation) or indirectly (e.g., through changing water use).Received October 12, 2012; accepted August 6, 2013
    Transactions of the American Fisheries Society 12/2014; 143(1).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The existence of multiple migration tactics within a population has been observed for several fish species, and they may contribute differentially to adult recruitment. Relative contribution by juveniles using the same habitats on different schedules is variable; therefore, understanding and conserving this diversity should be important to fisheries managers. We investigated adult recruitment by two distinct juvenile migration tactics in several spawning populations of stream-type Chinook Salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha in Idaho: those leaving the spawning grounds as subyearlings during June through November (downstream rearing, or DSR, type) and those emigrating from natal areas 1 year after emergence (natal reach rearing, or NRR, type). The DSR type had greater juvenile abundance in all populations, although the NRR type exhibited better survival from the natal reach to the migratory corridor. The DSR type had greater survival from smoltification to adult return to freshwater compared with the NRR type. More DSR emigrants than NRR emigrants returned to freshwater as adults, although the difference was influenced by cohort and population. Adult recruits to stream-type Chinook Salmon populations in Idaho are comprised mostly of DSR emigrants, i.e., fish that dispersed from their natal habitats and reared in reaches downstream. This finding is ubiquitous, although the size of the effect depends on cohort and population. We demonstrated that juvenile Chinook Salmon in Idaho do indeed use downstream rearing habitats effectively, thereby increasing recruitment of adults back to the spawning gravels in these populations. This study illustrates how dispersive life histories are essential to achieve the full productive potential of migratory stream fish populations.Received March 31, 2014; accepted July 16, 2014
    Transactions of the American Fisheries Society 11/2014; 143(6).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The first winter of life can play an important role in the success of age-0 fishes. First-winter survival is often size dependent, with larger fish exhibiting higher survival than small fish. Cohorts of age-0 saugeye female Walleye Sander vitreus × male Sauger S. canadensis stocked into Ohio reservoirs exhibit overwinter shifts toward larger body sizes; however, it is unclear whether growth, size-dependent mortality, or size-dependent emigration underlie this phenomenon. Saugeye may experience low prey availability during the overwinter period, making them especially vulnerable to starvation. Furthermore, survivors emerging from winter in poor energetic condition may experience reduced spring foraging success and growth. We used a combination of overwinter PIT tag studies in the field and overwinter outdoor pool experiments to understand these direct and indirect effects of winter on survival and size distributions of cohorts of saugeye. Using PIT tags to allow us to track growth of individuals in reservoirs, we found that saugeye of all sizes increased in length over winter, there was no evidence of size-dependent overwinter mortality, and rates of emigration out of the reservoir were greater for large saugeye than small saugeye. Thus, only growth rate, and not mortality or emigration biased toward small fish, can explain the observed overwinter shift in size distributions. In pool experiments, we found no direct effects of winter on survival, even in the complete absence of food, and no negative consequences of starvation over the winter on the ability of saugeye to resume feeding in the spring. Our results suggest that shifts in size distributions of first-year cohorts over winter are driven by growth rather than mortality. Neither direct effects of first winter on survival nor indirect effects mediated through effects of starvation on future foraging ability are important in recruitment success of saugeye in Ohio reservoirs.Received March 18, 2014; accepted June 30, 2014
    Transactions of the American Fisheries Society 11/2014; 143(6).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: On February 6, 2012, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed five distinct population segments (DPSs) of Atlantic Sturgeon Acipenser oxyrinchus encompassing their entire U.S. range, including one DPS in Chesapeake Bay, as either threatened or endangered under the Endangered Species Act. Designation of DPSs is a management tool that identifies significant, discrete, geographically defined portions of a species’ range, which can be listed as unique management units. At the time of listing, all DPSs except the Chesapeake Bay DPS comprised several rivers with known reproduction. After the Chesapeake Bay DPS was established, an additional spawning population was confirmed in the Pamunkey River, which is part of the York River system. We used the Schumacher–Eschmeyer formula for multiple census to estimate the number of adult Atlantic Sturgeon that spawned in the Pamunkey River during 2013. Gill nets were placed between river kilometers 27 and 67 in the upper Pamunkey River for 10 weeks during spawning season. The Schumacher–Eschmeyer model gave an estimate of 75 adult Atlantic Sturgeon (95% confidence interval = 17–168 adults) for the 2013 spawning population. This study represents the first estimate of annual spawning population abundance for any river in the Chesapeake Bay DPS and is only the third estimate of Atlantic Sturgeon abundance rangewide.Received March 24, 2014; accepted July 14, 2014
    Transactions of the American Fisheries Society 11/2014; 143(6).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Pacific Lamprey Entosphenus tridentatus, which is native to the Pacific coast of North America, is an important fisheries resource for some Native American communities and so has been a conservation concern. Chemical analysis of water conditioned with mature male Pacific Lampreys and electrophysiological examination of the identified sulfated bile acids revealed that Pacific Lampreys may use the two bile acid compounds, 3-keto petromyzonol sulfate (3kPZS) and petromyzonol sulfate (PZS), as mating pheromones that can attract ovulatory females and stimulate them to nest. Liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry analysis on extracts of water conditioned with mature male Pacific Lampreys identified both 3kPZS, known as a major sex pheromone component, and PZS, known as a component of migratory pheromones in Sea Lamprey Petromyzon marinus. When combined with the previous electro-olfactogram (EOG) data demonstrating olfactory sensitivity of Pacific Lampreys to both compounds, the identification of the two bile acid compounds suggests that Pacific Lamprey evolved to have a chemical communication system for reproduction similar to that of Sea Lamprey. Further studies are required to confirm putative pheromonal functions of these two compounds in Pacific Lamprey. Comprehensive understanding of the reproductive behavior mediated by sex pheromones may provide a helpful tool in restoring the dwindling Pacific Lamprey populations along the North Pacific coast of North America.Received March 7, 2014; accepted July 10, 2014
    Transactions of the American Fisheries Society 11/2014; 143(6).