Transactions of the ASAE. American Society of Agricultural Engineers (T ASABE )

Publisher: American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers

Journal description

Transactions of the ASAE, an international journal published by the American Society of Agricultural Engineers, contains peer-reviewed technical articles on the current research being conducted to help solve problems in agriculture, food and other biological systems. Every technological advancement necessarily begins with research, and Transactions of the ASAE presents cutting-edge research on a broad range of topics including agricultural machinery, drainage, irrigation, electronics, biological engineering, forestry, food engineering, agricultural structures, crop production, natural resources, soils, and more. To qualify for publication, the material must represent original, important contributions to the research or design literature and meet other rigorous criteria during the peer-review process. The journal also serves as an information network, providing names and addresses of the people and organizations conducting research in these and related areas of interest.

Current impact factor: 0.89

Impact Factor Rankings

2015 Impact Factor Available summer 2015
2010 Impact Factor 0.822
2009 Impact Factor 0.889
2008 Impact Factor 1.042
2007 Impact Factor 1.042
2006 Impact Factor 0.637
2005 Impact Factor 0.664
2004 Impact Factor 0.728
2003 Impact Factor 0.563
2002 Impact Factor 0.454
2001 Impact Factor 0.456
2000 Impact Factor 0.514
1999 Impact Factor 0.653
1998 Impact Factor 0.574
1997 Impact Factor 0.525

Impact factor over time

Impact factor
Year

Additional details

5-year impact 1.10
Cited half-life 0.00
Immediacy index 0.18
Eigenfactor 0.01
Article influence 0.34
Website Transactions of the ASAE (American Society of Agricultural Engineers) website
Other titles Transactions of the American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers
ISSN 0001-2351
OCLC 65222066
Material type Periodical
Document type Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The effects of processing conditions and cooking methods on the physical quality, anthocyanin content, and sensory attributes of frozen purple-fleshed sweetpotato (PFSP) French fries were investigated. PFSP strips were blanched in boiling water for 0, 5, or 10 min, par-fried at 180°C for 0 or 1 min, and stored at -20°C ±2°C. Frozen PFSP strips were then oven-baked at 180°C for 8 min or deep-fat fried at 180°C for 3 min. The lowest peak force values were determined in fries after 10 min blanching. However, the combination of par-frying and deep-fat frying significantly increased peak force in 10 min blanched PFSP fries. A deep purple color developed in fries treated with a combination of 5 or 10 min blanching, 1 min par-frying, and oven baking. A decrease in total monomeric anthocyanin content (14.51 ±0.45 mg per 100 g dry weight) and a corresponding increase in polymeric color (34.23%) were measured in oven-baked fries with no blanching and no par-frying. The 1 min par-frying increased total monomeric anthocynanin content to the highest level (36.05 ±0.60 mg per 100 g d.w.) in oven-baked fries without blanching. The lowest moisture content (20.1%) and highest oil content (37.9%) were determined in fries treated with 10 min blanching, 1 min par-frying, and deep-fat frying. A dark brown color was determined in fries treated with 10 min blanching, 1 min par-frying, and deep-fat frying. PFSP fries treated with 10 min blanching, no par-frying, and deep-fat frying had the highest sensory ratings according to a taste panel. However, the sensory quality of oven-baked fries was increased when samples were par-fried. Fries treated with 10 min blanching, 1 min par-frying, and oven baking may be a more nutritious alternative with 64.3% less oil content, 27.7% more anthocyanin content, and favorable overall sensory quality compared to fries treated with 10 min blanching, no par-frying, and deep-fat frying.
    Transactions of the ASAE. American Society of Agricultural Engineers 01/2012; 55(6):2285-2291.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Aseptic processing and conventional canning are both thermal processes that include heating, holding, cooling, and packaging steps. In aseptic processing, packaging is done after the heat transfer steps, so product quality as well as packaging size and material options are generally improved. The objective of this study was to compare aseptic processing and conventional canning based on textural quality of apple slices. Aseptic processing of apple slices heated by direct steam contact was investigated in this study, and heat penetration testing was used to determine processing time by measuring the time required for the center of apple slices to consistently reach the setpoint temperature of 82.2� C. In canning, can center temperature was tested for the same conditions. Samples of Golden Delicious, cored, sliced, and unpeeled apple slices were taken from a commercial processing line and aseptically processed based on the processing time determined by heat penetration testing. The remainder of the apple slice population was commercially canned. The texture of the aseptically processed and canned apple slices was compared by measuring the peak shear force using a Kramer shear device. Compared to the texture of conventionally canned apple slices, aseptic processing improved the texture of apple slices by 57.4%, 31%, and 30.5%, respectively, for the three processing days. Aseptically processed apple slices consistently required a higher shear force than conventionally canned slices, indicating that the former were of higher quality.
    Transactions of the ASAE. American Society of Agricultural Engineers 01/2011; 54(3):1001-1005.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Adding bioenergy to the US energy portfolio requires long-term profitability for bioenergy producers and the long-term protection of affected ecosystems. In this study, we present steps along the path towards evaluating both sides of the sustainability equation (production and environmental) for switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) using the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT). We modeled production of switchgrass and river flow using SWAT for current landscapes at a regional scale. To quantify feedstock production, we compared lowland switchgrass yields simulated by SWAT with estimates from a model based on empirical data for the eastern US. Geographic patterns were very similar. Average yields reported in field trials tended to be higher than average SWAT-predicted yields, which may nevertheless be more representative of production-scale yields. As a preliminary step toward quantifying bioenergy-related changes in water quality, we evaluated flow predictions by the SWAT model for the Arkansas-Red-White river basin. Monthly SWAT flow predictions were compared to USGS measurements from 86 subbasins across the region. Although agreement was good, analysis of residuals (functional validation) identified patterns to guide future improvements. Our next step will be to continue model improvement, after which we will forecast changes in water quality associated with incorporating bioenergy crops into future landscapes. This analysis will help us, in future, to identify areas with the highest economic and environmental potential for feedstock production.
    Transactions of the ASAE. American Society of Agricultural Engineers 10/2010; 53(5).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The effects of processing conditions on color and textural quality of refrigerated potato strips were investigated. To determine effect of blanching time, potato strips were blanched at low temperature (60°C) in 0.25% ascorbic acid (AA) and 0.5% CaCl2 solution for 10, 20, or 30 min and then blanched at high temperature (~98°C) in boiling water for 5, 10, or 15 min. The highest after‐frying peak force was determined in potato fries blanched at low temperature for 30 min and then blanched at high temperature for 5 min. Changes in blanching times did not significantly affect the lightness. To determine effect of AA and CaCl2, potato strips were blanched at low temperature for 20 min in 0.125% or 0.25% AA and 0%, 0.25%, or 0.5% CaCl2 solution and then blanched at high temperature in boiling water for 10 min. Before‐frying peak force of potato strips was significantly increased by increasing CaCl2 concentration. Ascorbic acid did not affect the color quality. To determine the effect of potato variety, Russet Burbank, Keuka Gold, Reba, and Norwis varieties of potato strips were blanched at low temperature in 0.5% CaCl2 solution for 20 min and then at high temperature in boiling water for 10 min. The highest after‐frying peak force was obtained for the Russet Burbank variety. Less color difference was determined in potato fries prepared from Reba compared to Russet Burbank, Keuka Gold, and Norwis. The results indicate that blanching Russet Burbank potato strips at 60°C in 0.5% CaCl2 solution for 20 or 30 min followed by blanching in boiling water for 5 or 10�min can be an effective process to produce high‐quality potato strips.
    Transactions of the ASAE. American Society of Agricultural Engineers 01/2010; 53(5):1661-1666.
  • Transactions of the ASAE. American Society of Agricultural Engineers 07/2009; 52(3):949-956.