Transactions of the ASAE. American Society of Agricultural Engineers (T ASABE )

Publisher: American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers

Description

Transactions of the ASAE, an international journal published by the American Society of Agricultural Engineers, contains peer-reviewed technical articles on the current research being conducted to help solve problems in agriculture, food and other biological systems. Every technological advancement necessarily begins with research, and Transactions of the ASAE presents cutting-edge research on a broad range of topics including agricultural machinery, drainage, irrigation, electronics, biological engineering, forestry, food engineering, agricultural structures, crop production, natural resources, soils, and more. To qualify for publication, the material must represent original, important contributions to the research or design literature and meet other rigorous criteria during the peer-review process. The journal also serves as an information network, providing names and addresses of the people and organizations conducting research in these and related areas of interest.

  • Impact factor
    0.89
    Show impact factor history
     
    Impact factor
  • 5-year impact
    1.10
  • Cited half-life
    0.00
  • Immediacy index
    0.18
  • Eigenfactor
    0.01
  • Article influence
    0.34
  • Website
    Transactions of the ASAE (American Society of Agricultural Engineers) website
  • Other titles
    Transactions of the American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers
  • ISSN
    0001-2351
  • OCLC
    65222066
  • Material type
    Periodical
  • Document type
    Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Adding bioenergy to the US energy portfolio requires long-term profitability for bioenergy producers and the long-term protection of affected ecosystems. In this study, we present steps along the path towards evaluating both sides of the sustainability equation (production and environmental) for switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) using the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT). We modeled production of switchgrass and river flow using SWAT for current landscapes at a regional scale. To quantify feedstock production, we compared lowland switchgrass yields simulated by SWAT with estimates from a model based on empirical data for the eastern US. Geographic patterns were very similar. Average yields reported in field trials tended to be higher than average SWAT-predicted yields, which may nevertheless be more representative of production-scale yields. As a preliminary step toward quantifying bioenergy-related changes in water quality, we evaluated flow predictions by the SWAT model for the Arkansas-Red-White river basin. Monthly SWAT flow predictions were compared to USGS measurements from 86 subbasins across the region. Although agreement was good, analysis of residuals (functional validation) identified patterns to guide future improvements. Our next step will be to continue model improvement, after which we will forecast changes in water quality associated with incorporating bioenergy crops into future landscapes. This analysis will help us, in future, to identify areas with the highest economic and environmental potential for feedstock production.
    Transactions of the ASAE. American Society of Agricultural Engineers 10/2010; 53(5).
  • Transactions of the ASAE. American Society of Agricultural Engineers 07/2009; 52(3):949-956.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The food dyes Tartrazine, Indigo Carmine, and Patent Blue were used as tracers to compare the deposition caused by three sequential spray applications on the same collector through multicomponent analysis of the mixture by ultraviolet‐visible absorption spectrophotometry. This methodology is quick, easy, conomical, and poses no health risks, given the use of authorized food dyes. The errors made in the estimation of the dyes were less than 10% for all the mixtures analyzed when Tartrazine was present in a concentration higher than 1 mg L-1. The methodology has been used to quantify mixtures of the three dyes on artificial collectors (filter‐paper strips) and on leaves of tomato plants. The variability of the data corresponding to the recovery rates of the dyes on the filter paper and leaves was 1.78% and 1.27%, respectively. These values are adequate to compare different spray applications using Tartrazine, Indigo Carmine, and Patent Blue as tracers over the same collector.
    Transactions of the ASAE. American Society of Agricultural Engineers 06/2008; 34(4):1177-1186.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The food dyes Tartrazine, Indigo Carmine, and Patent Blue were used as tracers to compare the deposition caused by three sequential spray applications on the same collector through multicomponent analysis of the mixture by ultraviolet‐visible absorption spectrophotometry. This methodology is quick, easy, economical, and poses no health risks, given the use of authorized food dyes. The errors made in the estimation of the dyes were less than 10% for all the mixtures analyzed when Tartrazine was present in a concentration higher than 1 mg L-1. The methodology has been used to quantify mixtures of the three dyes on artificial collectors (filter‐paper strips) and on leaves of tomato plants. The variability of the data corresponding to the recovery rates of the dyes on the filter paper and leaves was 1.78% and 1.27%, respectively. These values are adequate to compare different spray applications using Tartrazine, Indigo Carmine, and Patent Blue as tracers over the same collector.
    Transactions of the ASAE. American Society of Agricultural Engineers 01/2008; 51(4):1177-1186.

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