University of East London

London, London, United Kingdom

Departments View all

Department of Psychology
478
Total Impact Points
191
Members
School of Health, Sport and Bioscience
64
Total Impact Points
112
Members
Department of Bioscience
10
Total Impact Points
101
Members

Publication History View all

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Background Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS) is a common, complex, endocrine condition with potential long-term cardiovascular, endocrine and metabolic health implications. Currently, there exists no medical treatment that addresses all clinical presentations. Herbal practitioners often treat women with PCOS; yet, there is a lack of research investigating PCOS and herbal treatment. This study aimed to examine the current scientific literature on PCOS and phytotherapy, explore practitioners’ experiences treating women with the syndrome and evaluate whether there is a role for phytotherapy in the treatment of PCOS. Methods A literature search was conducted using the terms; ‘Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome’ / ‘PCOS’ and ‘phytotherapy’/‘herbal medicine’ / ‘herbs’. The published research identified by these terms was then reviewed. A brief questionnaire with a mix of eleven open and closed questions was sent to herbal practitioners on the National Institute of Medical Herbalists (NIMH) 2012 register. Results The literature review found promising results for the use of Mentha spicata, Cinnamomum verum and berberine containing herbs. There was a weaker evidence base for the use of Glycyrrhiza glabra and Paeonia lactiflora. The questionnaire was completed by 72 practitioners, 71% had treated women with PCOS. The majority (38%, n = 50) felt herbal medicine was ‘quite successful’ in treating PCOS. The average time until herbal treatment started to be successful was 3.2 months. The most frequently used herbs were Paeonia lactiflora, Glycyrrhiza glabra and Vitex agnus castus. Dietary and lifestyle advice emerged as frequently identified therapeutic interventions. Conclusions This exploratory study suggests that there is a role for phytotherapy in the treatment of PCOS. Further investigation, consisting of well-designed clinical trials and monitoring the successful use of herbal medicine by practitioners, is clearly necessary. This future research would serve to substantiate positive empirical evidence, constructing a more robust evidence base for the effective use of phytotherapy as a therapeutic option for women with PCOS.
    Journal of Herbal Medicine. 09/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Inflation of balloons provides a straightforward way of achieving large biaxial deformations. Previous studies have shown that when a balloon bursts, crack propagation occurs at very high speed – much higher than would be expected from the low strain modulus and elastic wave velocity of the rubber. The present paper is concerned with studies of the deformation and fracture of cylindrical balloons. On inflation, the deformations of such a balloon pass through an unstable region but subsequently increase monotonically with pressure. In this relatively high pressure region, the ratio of the longitudinal and circumferential extension ratios is broadly in accord with expectations from high-strain elasticity theory when the ratio of the corresponding stresses is taken into account. On bursting, crack speeds up to some 300 m/s are attained in this region. It is shown that these speeds are in accord with large increases in incremental moduli for the highly-strained rubber. Marked changes in crack tip profile observed at very high crack speeds are consistent with control of the rate of growth by inertia rather than by the viscoelastic properties of the rubber (as is believed to be the case at lower speeds). Consistent with this, various elastomers having different glass transition temperatures show similar crack growth behaviour in the very high speed region.
    International Journal of Non-Linear Mechanics 09/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Prebiotics are increasingly added to probiotic food preparations (synbiotics) to enhance probiotic survival and growth. This study examines the ability of three potential prebiotics; inulin, lactulose and lactobionic acid to support the growth of five probiotic lactobacilli cultures and provide protection from bile acid stress. Three lactobacilli probiotics could not utilise any of the prebiotics, with growth less than 20% compared to growth in glucose. Only Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM and Lactobacillus reuteri NCIMB 11951 utilised lactulose. Similar variability was observed with the ability of the prebiotics to protect probiotics from bile acid stress. Both L. acidophilus NCFM and L. reuteri NCIMB 11951 were able to grow in 2 mM cholic and taurocholic acid when incubated in synbiotic combinations with lactulose (1%) or lactobionic acid (1%). Although synbiotic preparations are increasingly used, the potential benefits to gut health may be limited as only specific combinations may enhance probiotic survival and growth.
    Journal of Functional Foods 05/2014;

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  • Head of Institution
    Professor John J Joughin (Vice Chancellor)
  • Website
    www.uel.ac.uk/research
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