Publication History View all

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This article suggests revisions to the scholarly orthodoxies concerning the status of art in Early Modern England, particularly during the reign of Henry viii. In the absence of the theoretical discussions of art that existed elsewhere in Europe, one must explore other methodological possibilities. What emerges is a more sophisticated appreciation of art than has been realized. Of particular value as evidence are the royal inventories, which reveal not only the types of art collected, but also the manner of its display. The approaches adopted here, it is argued, have wider applications beyond the study of Tudor England.
    Art History 04/2009; 32(2):290 - 306. DOI:10.1111/j.1467-8365.2009.00670.x
Information provided on this web page is aggregated encyclopedic and bibliographical information relating to the named institution. Information provided is not approved by the institution itself. The institution’s logo (and/or other graphical identification, such as a coat of arms) is used only to identify the institution in a nominal way. Under certain jurisdictions it may be property of the institution.