26
22.64
0.87
15

Publication History View all

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This paper examines the relations between self-reported attachment orientation at work and personality, self-esteem, trait emotional intelligence (aka emotional self-efficacy), and independently assessed career potential and job performance. Self-report data were collected from 211 managers in an international business in the hospitality industry; independent assessments of these managers' job performance and career potential were separately obtained from the organization. A self-report measure of romantic attachment was adapted for application in the work context; a two-factor solution was found for this measure. Secure/autonomous attachment orientation at work was positively related to self-esteem, trait emotional intelligence, extraversion, agreeableness, and conscientiousness, and also to job performance. Not only was secure/autonomous attachment orientation at work statistically predictive of job performance, but the new measure also made a distinct contribution, beyond conscientiousness, to this prediction.
    Attachment & Human Development 09/2011; 13(5):471-88.
  • The Wiley-Blackwell Handbook of Individual Differences, 04/2011: pages 217 - 241; , ISBN: 9781405184359
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Past studies highlight the importance of Trait Emotional Intelligence (EI) in the prediction of career success. Given the evidence that trait EI predicts job performance and job satisfaction, it is reasonable to expect this construct to also predict other forms of career success. In this study, we examine whether EI predicts entrepreneurship; that is, whether higher trait EI is linked to entrepreneurial behaviours and entrepreneurial success, and whether any effects of trait EI on entrepreneurship are independent of the personality trait of Core Self-Evaluations, demographic variables, and individual differences in entrepreneurial personality. Results show that trait EI predicts only some entrepreneurial outcomes beyond other variables examined, and with small effect sizes. This suggests that individual differences in entrepreneurship result only in part from inter-personal differences in trait EI. Implications for research and practice are discussed.
    Personality and Individual Differences - PERS INDIV DIFFER. 01/2011; 51(8):1028-1033.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: 150 young bankers estimated their IQ (Academic/Cognitive Intelligence) and EQ (Emotional Intelligence) before taking an IQ test. Pearson correlations were r = .40 and .41 between IQ test (Wonderlic Personnel Test) scores (M = 32.8) and IQ estimates (M = 27.9) and EQ estimates, respectively. Women's mean self-estimated IQ was significantly lower than men's.
    Psychological Reports 12/2009; 105(3 Pt 2):1092-4.
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This study is part of a programmatic research effort into the determinants of self-assessed abilities. It examined cross-cultural differences in beliefs about intelligence and self- and other-estimated intelligence in two countries at extreme ends of the European continent. In all, 172 British and 272 Turkish students completed a three-part questionnaire where they estimated their parents', partners' and own multiple intelligences (Gardner (10) and Sternberg (3)). They also completed a measure of the 'big five' personality scales and rated six questions about intelligence. The British sample had more experience with IQ tests than the Turks. The majority of participants in both groups did not believe in sex differences in intelligence but did think there were race differences. They also believed that intelligence was primarily inherited. Participants rated their social and emotional intelligence highly (around one standard deviation above the norm). Results suggested that there were more cultural than sex differences in all the ratings, with various interactions mainly due to the British sample differentiating more between the sexes than the Turks. Males rated their overall, verbal, logical, spatial, creative and practical intelligence higher than females. Turks rated their musical, body-kinesthetic, interpersonal and intrapersonal intelligence as well as existential, naturalistic, emotional, creative, and practical intelligence higher than the British. There was evidence of participants rating their fathers' intelligence on most factors higher than their mothers'. Factor analysis of the ten Gardner intelligences yield two clear factors: cognitive and social intelligence. The first factor was impacted by sex but not culture; it was the other way round for the second factor. Regressions showed that five factors predicted overall estimates: sex (male), age (older), test experience (has done tests), extraversion (strong) and openness (strong). Results are discussed in terms of the growing literature in the field.
    International Journal of Psychology 12/2009; 44(6):434-42.
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Whereas there is now a rapidly emerging literature on psychiatric literacy (Jorm, 2000), there is much less work on the public's knowledge of, and beliefs about the purpose of, and processes involved in, psychotherapy. This study looked at what lay people think happens during psychotherapy; what the processes and aims are; and the aetiology, treatment and prognosis for a mood and psychotic (bipolar, schizophrenia) and two neurotic (depression, obsessive-compulsive) disorders. In total 185 British adults, recruited by a market research company, completed a four-part questionnaire, lasting about 20 minutes. Participants were generally very positive about psychotherapy believing the experience to be highly beneficial. Schizophrenia was seen to have a biological basis; depression and bipolar disorder were perceived to have family, work and other stress-related causal issues; obsessive-compulsive disorder was seen to be caused by stress and family-related issues. Participants thought psychotherapy a very effective treatment but drug treatments more effective for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. 'Talking it over' was judged highly relevant, specifically to depression. Participants believed that depression had a good chance of cure, and remission, but that neither schizophrenia nor bipolar disorder had much chance of an effective cure. Lay people show a curious pattern on insight, ignorance and naivety with regard to the cause and cure of mental disorders. They appear to have a modestly realistic but somewhat naive view of the process and efficacy of psychotherapy. This may influence how they react to their own and others' mental illness. It has clear implications for education in psychiatric literacy.
    International Journal of Social Psychiatry 08/2009; 55(6):525-37.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: A representative British sample of 257 adults completed a questionnaire in which they indicated their preference for eight dentists stratified by sex, age, and training location. These data were analysed in relation to participants' own sex and age, the latter stratified by a median split. A mixed analysis of variance indicated two main effects: a preference for younger (rather than older) dentists and dentists trained in Britain (rather than in Asia). There were also a significant two-way interaction between dentist age and training location: for the British-trained there was a preference for younger dentists, whereas for the Asian-trained there was a preference for older dentists. Limitations of the study design are discussed in conclusion.
    Psychology Health and Medicine 04/2009; 14(2):143-9.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: 230 adults estimated the ages at which children and adolescents ages 1 to 16 years could perform certain tasks like, "Say the months of the year backwards" and "Ride a bicycle". Nearly two-thirds of the participants consistently underestimated the age at which young people could perform. A total "correct" score, computed for each participant, formed a normal distribution. This score was used as a criterion measure for a series of multiple regressions. The strongest predictor was the extent to which people had regular contact with children, indicating the role of experience.
    Psychological Reports 11/2008; 103(2):634-8.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This study examined the relationship between three short measures of the Big Five. 100 participants completed the 60-item NEO-FFI, the 10-item Personality Inventory, the 5-item Single-Item Measure of Personality, as well as estimating their own NEO-FFI score. Correlations varied from r = .30 to .75. Concerns and advantages of short measures are discussed.
    Psychological Reports 03/2008; 102(1):312-6.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Over 4,000 British adults completed two widely used personality-type tests at an Assessment Centre, the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator and the Fundamental Interpersonal Relations Orientation-Behavior. Both correlational and regressional analyses showed modest overlap. Inclusion was related to Introversion-Extraversion and Control to the Thinking-Feeling Dimension. The Sensing-Intuition and Judging-Perceiving dimensions of the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator had only weak correlations with the Fundamental Interpersonal Relations Orientation-Behavior scores (all values below .08). The difference scores between Wanted and Expressed on the Fundamental Interpersonal Relations Orientation-Behavior indicated that the Thinking, Perceiving, Extraverts had the highest differences between Perceived and Wanted scores.
    Psychological Reports 01/2008; 101(3 Pt 1):970-8.
Information provided on this web page is aggregated encyclopedic and bibliographical information relating to the named institution. Information provided is not approved by the institution itself. The institution’s logo (and/or other graphical identification, such as a coat of arms) is used only to identify the institution in a nominal way. Under certain jurisdictions it may be property of the institution.