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    ABSTRACT: Figure optionsDownload full-size imageDownload high-quality image (83 K)Download as PowerPoint slide
    Surface Science 10/2014;
  • Journal of electroanalytical chemistry 09/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Diversity Set was screened for potential inhibitors of phospho-MurNAc-pentapeptide translocase MraY from Escherichia coli using a primary fluorescence enhancement assay, followed by a secondary radiochemical assay. One new MraY inhibitor was identified from this screen, a naphthylisoquinoline alkaloid michellamine B, which inhibited E. coli MraY (IC50 456μM) and Bacillus subtilis MraY (IC50 386μM), and which showed antimicrobial activity against B. subtilis (MIC 16μg/mL). Following an earlier report of halogenated fluoresceins identified from a combined MraY/MurG screen, three halogenated fluoresceins were tested as inhibitors of E. coli MraY and E. coli MurG, and phloxine B was identified as an inhibitor of E. coli MraY (IC50 32μM). Molecular docking of inhibitor structures against the structure of Aquifex aeolicus MraY indicates that phloxine B appears to bind to the Mg(2+) cofactor in the enzyme active site, while michellamine B binds to a hydrophobic groove formed between transmembrane helices 5 and 9.
    Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry 07/2014;
  • European Polymer Journal 06/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The post-translational modification known as glycation affects the physiological properties of peptides and proteins. Glycation is particularly important during hyperglycaemia where α-dicarbonyl compounds are generated. These compounds react with proteins to generate α-dicarbonyl-derived glycation products, which are correlated with diabetic complications such as nephropathy, retinopathy, and neuropathy, among others. One of these α-dicarbonyl compounds is ethanedial, also known as glyoxal. Thereby, glyoxal binding to protein/peptides is studied by electron capture dissociation (ECD) and collisionally activated dissociation (CAD). Acetylated and non-acetylated undecapeptides containing one lysine and one arginine susceptible of glycation were reacted with glyoxal under pseudo-physiological and MeOH/H2 O (50:50) conditions. Two types of glyoxal-derived AGEs were fragmented by ECD and CAD using 12 Tesla Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICRMS). Reaction with glyoxal under different reaction conditions showed the addition of C2 O and C2 H2 O2 , which corresponded to a net increase on the peptide mass of 39.9949 Da and 58.0055 Da, respectively. The binding site was assigned within an error <1 ppm, using ECD and CAD. The results indicated that both types of glyoxal-derived AGEs are formed at the side chain of arginine located in position 3. Types and binding sites of glyoxal-derived AGEs were investigated in peptides containing one arginine-one lysine using FTICRMS. Two net mass additions to the mass of the peptide were assigned as C2 O and C2 H2 O2 , which were located at the arginine side chain. In addition, these mass additions (C2 O and C2 H2 O2 ) observed in the peptides were unaffected by different reaction conditions. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry 01/2014; 28(1):25-32.
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    ABSTRACT: Streptomyces, and related genera of Actinobacteria, are renowned for their ability to produce antibiotics and other bioactive natural products with a wide range of applications in medicine and agriculture. Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) is a model organism that has been used for more than five decades to study the genetic and biochemical basis for the production of bioactive metabolites. In 2002, the complete genome sequence of S. coelicolor was published. This greatly accelerated progress in understanding the biosynthesis of metabolites known or suspected to be produced by S. coelicolor and revealed that streptomycetes have far greater potential to produce bioactive natural products than suggested by classical bioassay-guided isolation studies. In this article, efforts to exploit the S. coelicolor genome sequence for the discovery of novel natural products and biosynthetic pathways are summarized.
    Journal of Industrial Microbiology 12/2013;
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    ABSTRACT: The electro-oxidation of dopamine (DA) is investigated on the unmodified surfaces of five different classes of carbon electrodes: glassy carbon (GC), oxygen-terminated polycrystalline boron-doped diamond (pBDD), edge plane pyrolytic graphite (EPPG), basal plane pyrolytic graphite (BPPG), and the basal surface of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG), encompassing five distinct grades with step edge density and coverage varying by more than 2 orders of magnitude. Surfaces were prepared carefully and characterized by a range of techniques, including atomic force microscopy (AFM), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), and Raman spectroscopy. Although pBDD was found to be the least susceptible to surface fouling (even at relatively high DA concentrations), the reaction showed sluggish kinetics on this electrode. In contrast, DA electro-oxidation at pristine basal plane HOPG at concentrations ≤100 μM in 0.15 M PBS, pH 7.2, showed fast kinetics and only minor susceptibility toward surface fouling from DA byproducts, although the extent of HOPG surface contamination by oxidation products increased substantially at higher concentrations (with the response similar on all grades, irrespective of step edge coverage). EPPG also showed a fast response, with little indication of passivation with repeated voltammetric cycling but a relatively high background signal due to the high capacitance of this graphite surface termination. Of all five carbon electrode types, freshly cleaved basal plane HOPG showed the clearest signal (distinct from the background) at low concentrations of DA (<10 μM) as a consequence of the low capacitance. Studies of the electrochemical oxidation of DA in the presence of the common interferents ascorbic acid (AA) and serotonin (5-HT), of relevance to neurochemical analysis, showed that the signals for DA were still clearly and easily resolved at basal plane HOPG surfaces. In the presence of AA, repetitive voltammetry caused products of AA electro-oxidation to adsorb onto the HOPG surface, forming a permselective film that allowed the electrochemical oxidation of DA to proceed unimpeded, while greatly inhibiting the electrochemical response of AA itself. The studies presented provide conclusive evidence that the pristine surface of basal plane HOPG is highly active for the detection of DA, irrespective of the step edge density and method of cleavage, and adds to a growing body of evidence that the basal plane of HOPG is a much more active electrode for many classes of electrode reactions than previously believed.
    Analytical Chemistry 12/2013;
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    ABSTRACT: Non-ribosomal peptides are bio synthesized using a range of enzymes that allow much more structural variability compared with "normal" peptides. Deviations from the standard amino acid structures are common features of this diverse class of natural products, making sequencing a challenging process. FTICR mass spectrometry, specifically the complementary tandem mass spectrometry techniques collision activated dissociation (CAD) and electron induced dissociation (EID), have been used to reveal structural information on the non-ribosomal peptide actinomycin D. EID was also combined with a multiple ion isolation method in order to provide an accurate (sub-ppm) internal calibration for the product ions. EID has been found to produce more detailed, complementary data than CAD for actinomycin D, with additional information being provided through fragmentation of the sodium and lithium adducts. Furthermore, the use of isolation in the FTICR cell was found to increase product ion intensities relative to the precursor ion, enabling significantly more peaks to be detected than when using EID alone. The combination of multiple ion isolation with EID, therefore, enables an accurate internal calibration of the fragment ions to be made (average mass uncertainty of <0.3 ppm), as well as increasing the degree of fragmentation of the compound, resulting in detailed structural information.
    Journal of the American Society for Mass Spectrometry 12/2013;
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    ABSTRACT: Crotonaldehyde (2-butenal) adsorption over gold sub-nanometer particles, and the influence of co-adsorbed oxygen, has been systematically investigated by computational methods. Using density functional theory, the adsorption energetics of crotonaldehyde on bare and oxidised gold clusters (Au13, d = 0.8 nm) were determined as a function of oxygen coverage and coordination geometry. At low oxygen coverage, sites are available for which crotonaldehyde adsorption is enhanced relative to bare Au clusters by 10 kJ mol(-1). At higher oxygen coverage, crotonaldehyde is forced to adsorb in close proximity to oxygen weakening adsorption by up to 60 kJ mol(-1) relative to bare Au. Bonding geometries, density of states plots and Bader analysis, are used to elucidate crotonaldehyde bonding to gold nanoparticles in terms of partial electron transfer from Au to crotonaldehyde, and note that donation to gold from crotonaldehyde also becomes significant following metal oxidation. At high oxygen coverage we find that all molecular adsorption sites have a neighbouring, destabilising, oxygen adatom so that despite enhanced donation, crotonaldehyde adsorption is always weakened by steric interactions. For a larger cluster (Au38, d = 1.1 nm) crotonaldehyde adsorption is destabilized in this way even at a low oxygen coverage. These findings provide a quantitative framework to underpin the experimentally observed influence of oxygen on the selective oxidation of crotyl alcohol to crotonaldehyde over gold and gold-palladium alloys.
    Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics 12/2013;
  • Biochimica et Biophysica Acta 12/2013; 1830(12):5354-5355.
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