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    ABSTRACT: This article challenges the dominance of a rupture model for understanding how we live day-to-day with life-threatening illness and the prospect of death. It argues that this model acts as a key interpretive framework for understanding dying and its related experiences. As a result, a rupture model upholds a normative and inherently crisis-based view of severe ill-health that reifies dying as an experience which exists outside of, and somehow transformatively beyond, everyday matters of ordinary life. These matters include the minutiae of daily experience which inform and shape our lived identities - as individuals and as relational selves. Drawing primarily on interview data from two family case studies that have contributed to an ethnographic project exploring family experiences of living with life-threatening illness, it will show how mundane, daily life is integral to understanding the ways in which families are produced and able to maintain a sense of continuity during circumstances of impending death. The analysis presented here moves analytical understanding of dying experience towards a theory of how individuals and families 'know' and engage with so-called 'big' life events and experiences. In this way, my study helps generate a novel and more inclusive way of understanding living with life-threatening/limiting illness.
    Mortality 08/2013; 18(3):251-269.
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    ABSTRACT: AIMS: To explore if and how information about a transition to a palliative care approach was communicated to patients recently discharged from hospital and who fulfilled standardized criteria for palliative care need. BACKGROUND: Palliative care philosophy and, more recently, UK palliative care policy, endorse a context of 'open' awareness, where all parties openly acknowledge that the patient's death is approaching. The perceived benefits of making the patient aware of their prognosis encompass a variety of planning activities, which mean that death, when it occurs, is arguably more in keeping with the wishes of the patient. DESIGN: A qualitative inductive interview study conducted in 2010-2011. METHODS: Fifteen semi-structured interviews were conducted with 15 patients and 3 family carers. All patients were identified as having palliative care needs according to standardized criteria, 3-6 months after discharge from hospital. A thematic analysis was undertaken. FINDINGS: Contrary to the professed ideal of 'open' awareness, some participants were only partially aware and others wholly unaware that they were likely to be approaching the end-of-life. Those identified as unaware were over 85. Participants displayed a reluctance to acquire knowledge which would require them to face the imminence of death. CONCLUSION: Philosophy and policy aside, people do not always conform to the autonomy paradigm of a self-directed life followed by a self-directed death.
    Journal of Advanced Nursing 04/2013;
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    ABSTRACT: There has been considerable debate about the future sustainability of pension provision and, in particular, the precarious position of many female pensioners. The reasons for women's lower participation rates in private pensions than men's require greater investigation. Using the General Lifestyle Survey (GLF) 2008, this article examines the impact of various characteristics on the likelihood of contributing to a private pension, such as educational attainments, income, occupational group, full-time/part-time status, and whether an individual has any dependent children. It shows that these characteristics play an important role in access to private pensions. Finally, it suggests that strategies to alleviate disadvantages must take into account the complex circumstances that individuals experience throughout the life course, which result in gendered pension provision.
    Journal of Aging & Social Policy 01/2013; 25(3):197-217.
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    ABSTRACT: This paper explores non-relinquishing birth parents’ experiences of contested child care and adoption proceedings. It highlights the perceptions and voices of birth parents which are rarely prioritized in dominant discourses of professional practice in this area. The paper reviews previous related research and also discusses a small-scale empirical study which elicited the perspectives of three birth parents whose children had been made subject to care proceedings and placed for adoption in England. Drawing on previous research and this study, the paper makes range of practice recommendations for sensitive professional practice with birth parents during contested child care and adoption proceedings.
    Child & Family Social Work 03/2011; 16(4):444 - 453.
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    ABSTRACT: Men's involvement in prenatal screening is becoming increasingly important. However, despite the potentially significant role of fathers in haemoglobinopathy screening, their participation is under researched. Furthermore, the portrayal of Black and minority ethnic (BME) fathers tends to be based on persisting stereotypes of men as either absentee parents with limited roles in screening or as controlling decision-makers. To describe the influence of ethnicity and gender on the process of participation of men in antenatal screening for sickle cell and thalassaemia. A qualitative study, using in-depth interviews and focus groups with 22 pregnant women from a range of socio-economic and ethnic backgrounds, 16 male partners and 15 midwives in a northern city in the UK. Men from BME groups take a pragmatic and equitable role in screening with their partners. White British men on the other hand, while willing to participate in screening, take a more casual view of their own direct participation. Accounts from hospital midwives supported these findings. While acknowledging the importance of material connections between certain BME groups and blood disorders, two key issues are raised. First, BME men's involvement contribute a challenge towards existing assumptions often made about BME fathers. Second, White British men's participation can be useful in determining the genetic status of the foetus and therefore their role should not be neglected. Screening research and practice need to broaden out their focus on issues of gender, ethnicity and screening.
    Ethnicity and Health 01/2011; 16(4-5):327-41.
  • Child Abuse Review 10/2010; 19(5):308 - 311.
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    ABSTRACT: One of the problems the police face is how to maintain or improve levels of public access and communication within limited resources and a range of policing priorities. Policing multi-cultural areas with multiple deprivations, such as the East End of London, requires networked information and communication services. The development of information and communication technology (ICT) is potentially a new form of communication for community police services. To develop ICT for police work involves understanding and gaining knowledge about how these technologies fit into police services and with the needs of local residents.
    The Howard Journal of Criminal Justice 11/2009; 48(5):501 - 513.
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    ABSTRACT: Homicide-suicide (HS) events in Yorkshire and the Humber have been documented previously by Milroy in a study of the period 1975 to 1992 (Milroy, Med Sci Law. 1993;33:167-171; Milroy 1994; Milroy, Forensic Sci Int. 1995;71:117-122; Milroy, Med Sci Law. 1995;35:213-217; and Milroy, J Clin Forensic Med. 1998;5:61-64). Reported here is an update of that study covering HS events in the same region from 1993 to 2007. Data from cohort 1 (1975-1992) and cohort 2 (1993-2007) are presented and compared, where data are available, with the findings of 2 previous studies in England and Wales (Barraclough and Harris, Psychol Med. 2002;32:577-584; and West 1965). Homicide followed by suicide is often defined in the literature as homicide(s) followed by the suicide of the perpetrator within 1 week of the homicide(s) (Barraclough and Harris, Psychol Med. 2002;32:577-584; Campanelli and Gilson, Am J Forensic Med Pathol. 2002;23:248-251; and Hannah et al, 1998;19:275-283). All the cases reported here fall within this definition. Findings are consonant with international literature, and suggest that HS is most likely to be carried out by an older, white, married, or cohabiting working man, who kills his female partner and/or their children and then himself. There are indications that restricting access to significant methods of killing can reduce the incidence of HS.
    The American journal of forensic medicine and pathology: official publication of the National Association of Medical Examiners 11/2009; 31(1):58-63.
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    ABSTRACT: Eleven years ago Wendy Booth was involved in a research study that looked at the effects of relocating people with learning difficulties from long-stay institutions into less restrictive accommodation. She became friends with one of the women who was moving from hospital and they still see each other often. Two subsequent research studies have also left a legacy of people who phone or write to her on a regular basis. This paper addresses the ethical implications of including lonely people as partners in research.
    British Journal of Learning Disabilities 08/2009; 26(4):132 - 134.
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    ABSTRACT: As families are central to the implementation of the Convention on the Rights of the Child and children's rights generally, it is necessary to develop a deeper understanding of the ways in which children and adults interact with each other in these spheres. Thus, this paper explores the dynamics of parent-child relationships in Ghana, the first country to ratify the Convention. In particular, it focuses on the three Rs of intergenerational relationships in Ghana - respect, responsibility and reciprocity, which continue to be central to parent-child/adult-child relations, and assesses their implications for the very concept of children's rights as inalienable and the implementation of the Convention.
    The International Journal of Children s Rights 06/2009; 17(3):415-432.
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