203
641.07
3.16
337

Publication History View all

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The language used by National Health Service (NHS) "commissioning" managers when discussing their roles and responsibilities can be seen as a manifestation of "identity work", defined as a process of identifying. This paper aims to offer a novel approach to analysing "identity work" by triangulation of multiple analytical methods, combining analysis of the content of text with analysis of its form. Fairclough's discourse analytic methodology is used as a framework. Following Fairclough, the authors use analytical methods associated with Halliday's systemic functional linguistics. While analysis of the content of interviews provides some information about NHS Commissioners' perceptions of their roles and responsibilities, analysis of the form of discourse that they use provides a more detailed and nuanced view. Overall, the authors found that commissioning managers have a higher level of certainty about what commissioning is not rather than what commissioning is; GP managers have a high level of certainty of their identity as a GP rather than as a manager; and both GP managers and non-GP managers oscillate between multiple identities depending on the different situations they are in. This paper offers a novel approach to triangulation, based not on the usual comparison of multiple data sources, but rather based on the application of multiple analytical methods to a single source of data. This paper also shows the latent uncertainty about the nature of commissioning enterprise in the English NHS.
    Journal of Health Organisation and Management 03/2013; 27(1):4-23.
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: General practice receptionists fulfil an essential role in UK primary care, shaping patient access to health professionals. They are often portrayed as powerful 'gatekeepers'. Existing literature and management initiatives advocate more training to improve their performance and, consequently, the patient experience. To explore the complexity of the role of general practice receptionists by considering the wider practice context in which they work. Ethnographic observation in seven urban general practices in the north-west of England. Seven researchers conducted 200 hours of ethnographic observation, predominantly in the reception areas of each practice. Forty-five receptionists were involved in the study and were asked about their work as they carried out their activities. Observational notes were taken. Analysis involved ascribing codes to incidents considered relevant to the role and organising these into related clusters. Receptionists were faced with the difficult task of prioritising patients, despite having little time, information, and training. They felt responsible for protecting those patients who were most vulnerable, however this was sometimes made difficult by protocols set by the GPs and by patients trying to 'play' the system. Framing the receptionist-patient encounter as one between the 'powerful' and the 'vulnerable' gets in the way of fully understanding the complex tasks receptionists perform and the contradictions that are inherent in their role. Calls for more training, without reflective attention to practice dynamics, risk failing to address systemic problems, portraying them instead as individual failings.
    British Journal of General Practice 03/2013; 63(608):177-84.
  • BMJ (online) 12/2012; 345:e8508.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Abstract The somatoform disorders, as currently defined in DSM-IV and ICD-10, have been criticized for their complexity and poor clinical utility. In this paper we consider these criticisms as well as the conceptual question of whether there is sufficient evidence for classifying them as mental and behavioural disorders. The review suggests that, as currently defined, somatoform disorders do not fulfil a recently articulated set of criteria for mental and behavioural disorders. In particular, the disorders are not defined according to positive psychological and behavioural disorders and evidence is sparse to support their classification as different and distinct diagnoses. Any revision of the disorders should not be based on 'medically unexplained' symptoms. Rather, the relevant diagnoses should include a combination of bothersome somatic symptoms with several other psychological features including beliefs about somatic symptoms and evidence of marked concerns about health and illness. Finally, the review presents a set of proposals for the revision of these disorders, by the Somatic Disorders and Dissociative Disorders Working Group of the WHO International Advisory Group for the Revision of ICD-10 Mental and Behavioural Disorders, which attempt to take account of the criticisms and current understanding of somatic experiences.
    International Review of Psychiatry 12/2012; 24(6):556-67.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Abstract Background: Explanatory models of illness, held by patients and treating clinicians, offer justifications and propose explanations for sickness, treatment evaluations and choice. These have been studied in relation to common mental disorders but research on explanatory models of psychosis (EMOP) has received scant attention. Adequately understanding patients' explanatory models for psychosis has important clinical implications. Method: We systematically examined studies on EMOP in the developing world to report on the nature of explanatory models, their relationship with help-seeking, duration of untreated psychosis (DUP), perceived stigma and any differences in the explanatory models between first and subsequent episodes. Results: 14 studies examining EMOP in developing countries were identified. The majority of studies reported predominantly supernatural and psychosocial EMOP. Holding supernatural and psychosocial explanatory models affected help-seeking behaviour, treatment modalities used and DUP. Discussion: EMOP in developing countries are rich and varied. The literature reports on a variety of populations using different methods and suffers from methodological limitations. Some recent studies have also attempted to modify explanatory models by using educational interventions; however, this was not examined in patient populations. Further research is needed to examine the impact of different explanatory models on DUP and help-seeking behaviours.
    International Review of Psychiatry 10/2012; 24(5):450-62.
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The relationship between functional somatic syndromes and multiple somatic symptoms is unclear. PURPOSE: We assessed whether the number of somatic symptoms is a predictor of health status in three functional somatic syndromes (FSS). METHODS: In a population-based study of 990 UK adults we assessed chronic widespread pain (CWP), chronic fatigue (CF) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) by questionnaire and medical record data. We assessed health status (Short Form 12 and EQ-5D), number of somatic symptoms (Somatic Symptom Inventory) and anxiety/depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale) both at baseline and at follow-up 1 year later. RESULTS: The proportion of people with an FSS who also have multiple somatic symptoms (52-55 %) was similar in the three functional syndromes. The presence of multiple somatic symptoms was associated with more impaired health status both at baseline and at follow-up. This finding was not explained by severity of FSS. In the absence of multiple somatic symptoms, the health status of the FSS was fair or good. In multiple regression analysis, the number of somatic symptoms, the presence of a functional syndrome (CWP or CF) and anxiety/depression were predictors of EQ-5D thermometer at follow-up after adjustment for confounders. CONCLUSIONS: Multiple somatic symptoms in people with an FSS are associated with impaired health status and this cannot be explained by more severe functional syndrome or the presence of anxiety and depression.
    International Journal of Behavioral Medicine 08/2012;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Psychosocial assessment is a central aspect of managing self-harm in hospitals, designed to encompass needs and risk, and to lead to further care. However, little is known about service user experiences of assessment, or what aspects of assessment service users value. The aim of this study was to explore service user experiences of assessment, and examine the short-term and longer-term meanings of assessment for service users. METHOD: Interpretative phenomenological analysis was applied to 13 interviews with service users following hospital attendance, and seven follow-up interviews conducted 3 months later. RESULTS: Few participants had a clear understanding of assessment's purpose. Assessment had the potential to promote or challenge hope, dependent on whether it was experienced as accepting or critical. If follow-up care did not materialise, this reinforced hopelessness and promoted disengagement from services. LIMITATIONS: The study sample was small and the participants heterogeneous in terms of self-harm history, method and intent, which may limit the transferability of the findings to other settings. Only self-report data on clinical diagnosis were collected. CONCLUSIONS: This was the first study to utilise an in-depth qualitative approach to investigate service user experiences of assessment and follow-up. The findings suggest that re-conceptualising psychosocial assessment as primarily an opportunity to engage service users therapeutically may consequently affect how health services are perceived. In order to maintain benefits established during the hospital experience, follow-up needs to be timely and integrated with assessment.
    Journal of affective disorders 08/2012;
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Increased amygdala response to negative emotions seen in functional MRI (fMRI) has been proposed as a biomarker for negative emotion processing bias underlying depressive symptoms and vulnerability to depressive relapse that are normalized by antidepressant drug treatment. The purpose of this study was to determine whether abnormal amygdala responses to face emotions in depression are related to specific emotions or change in response to antidepressant treatment and whether they are present as a stable trait in medication-free patients in remission. Sixty-two medication-free unipolar depressed patients (38 were currently depressed, and 24 were in remission) and 54 healthy comparison subjects underwent an indirect face-emotion processing task during fMRI. Thirty-two currently depressed patients were treated with the antidepressant citalopram for 8 weeks. Adherence to treatment was evaluated by measuring citalopram plasma concentrations. Patients with current depression had increased bilateral amygdala responses specific to sad faces relative to healthy comparison subjects and nonmedicated patients in stable remission. Treatment with citalopram abolished the abnormal amygdala responses to sad faces in currently depressed patients but did not alter responses to fearful faces. Aberrant amygdala activation in response to sad facial emotions is specific to the depressed state and is a potential biomarker for a negative affective bias during a depressive episode.
    American Journal of Psychiatry 08/2012; 169(8):841-50.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Suicide represents a substantial problem, with significant societal and personal impact. The identification of factors influencing suicide risk is an important step in preventing self-harming behaviour. In this article the authors explore whether emotional instability increases risk of suicide, beyond that of mood intensity. METHOD: This article provides a summary of existing theory and indirect evidence in support of an association between emotional instability and suicidality. A systematic literature search (Embase, Medline, PsychInfo) was carried out on literature conducted up to October, 2011. Meta-analysis was used to assess the strength of the proposed association. RESULTS: The systematic search identified 20 journal articles meeting the inclusion criteria, including retrospective questionnaire design studies and research conducted across several time-points. Meta-analysis revealed a moderate association, which remained statistically significant even when only including studies conducted over multiple time-points. This effect was attenuated, but remained significant, when controlling for study selection bias. LIMITATIONS: Retrospective questionnaire studies failed to adequately control for mood level. Little is still currently understood about the types of emotional instability (e.g., dysoria, anxiety) most associated with suicidality. CONCLUSIONS: Future avenues of investigation include micro- to macro-longitudinal research and the differentiation of emotion subtypes and instability metrics. Momentary assessment techniques may help to detect subtle fluctuations in mood leading to more effective and immediate intervention. Psychosocial intervention strategies for treating unstable emotions are discussed.
    Journal of affective disorders 07/2012;
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Rates of obesity are rising and previous research suggests this is not effectively dealt with in healthcare settings. Nurses are increasingly involved in lifestyle management of patients, and understanding the barriers to discussing weight with patients is likely to increase successful weight management. Obesity management is a role that nursing students will need to be equipped with and more likely to be targeted for future training developments in tackling the increasing rates of obesity. OBJECTIVES: To explore the perceptions of obesity, potential barriers to successful patient weight management and training needs of nursing students. METHODS: Qualitative, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 20 nursing students. Audiotaped interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed using an inductive thematic approach informed by principles of grounded theory. RESULTS: Participants reported the challenge of managing obesity in healthcare practice, such as the impact of negative attitudes in healthcare practice on patient care. Although perceived as core to their training, nursing students lacked the confidence and techniques to discuss weight management with patients. Participants also perceived the nursing curriculum as lacking a focus on obesity, and reported a need for advanced communication skills training. CONCLUSION: Although seen as important, nurses lack the skills to facilitate weight management, leading to nurses failing to broach the issue. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: Nurse educators should consider the perceptions of current students when making curriculum developments in this area.
    Nurse education today 07/2012;
Information provided on this web page is aggregated encyclopedic and bibliographical information relating to the named institution. Information provided is not approved by the institution itself. The institution’s logo (and/or other graphical identification, such as a coat of arms) is used only to identify the institution in a nominal way. Under certain jurisdictions it may be property of the institution.