Edinburgh, Scotland, United Kingdom

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School of GeoSciences
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School of Informatics
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School of Engineering
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    ABSTRACT: Narrow-bore instruments are commonly perceived to be brighter than wide-bore models of the same kind of instrument. This effect is closely related to the effect of the bore profile of a brass instrument on the potential for non-linear propagation of sound within the tube. This paper reports on practical tests with trumpets of different bore diameters, experiments with loudspeaker excitation of instruments, and simulations. The brassiness curves of a range of low instruments with similar Brassiness Potential but differing in their absolute bore diameters are compared. The relative importance of the two effects is explored.
    01/2016;
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    ABSTRACT: Quasars that allow the study of intergalactic medium (IGM) He ii are very rare, since they must be at high redshift along sightlines free of substantial hydrogen absorption, but recent work has dramatically expanded the number of such quasars known. We analyze two dozen higher-redshift (z = 3.1–3.9) low-resolution He ii quasar spectra from the Hubble Space Telescope and find that their He ii Gunn–Peterson troughs suggest exclusion of very early and very late reionization models, favoring a reionization redshift of z ∼ 3. Although the data quality is not sufficient to reveal details such as the expected redshift evolution of helium opacity, we obtain the first ensemble measure of helium opacity at high redshift averaged over many sightlines: τ = 4.90 at z ∼ 3.3. We also find that it would be very difficult to observe the IGM red wing of absorption from the beginning of He ii reionization, but depending on the redshift of reionization and the size of ionization zones, it might be possible to do so in some objects with the current generation of UV spectrographs.
    The Astrophysical Journal 08/2015; 726.
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    ABSTRACT: The fields of metallic nanoparticle study and synthetic biology have a great deal to offer one another. Metallic nanoparticles as a class of material have many useful properties. Their small size allows for more points of contact than would be the case with a similar bulk compound, making nanoparticles excellent candidates for catalysts or for when increased levels of binding are required. Some nanoparticles have unique optical qualities, making them well suited as sensors, while others display para-magnetism, useful in medical imaging, especially by Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). Many of these metallic nanoparticles could be used in creating tools for synthetic biology, and conversely the use of synthetic biology could itself be utilised to create nanoparticle tools. Examples given here include the potential use of quantum dots (QDs) and gold nanoparticles as sensing mechanisms in synthetic biology, as well as ways of using synthetic biology to create ways of sensing metal nanoparticles based on current methods of detecting metals and metalloids such as arsenate. There are a number of organisms which are able to produce a range of metallic nanoparticles naturally, such as species of the fungus Phoma which produces anti-microbial silver nanoparticles. The Biological synthesis of nanoparticles may have many advantages over their more traditional industrial synthesis. If the proteins involved in biological nanoparticle synthesis can be put into a suitable bacterial chassis then they might be manipulated and the pathways engineered in order to produce more valuable nanoparticles.
    New Biotechnology 12/2014;

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Top publications last week by downloads

 
Medicine &amp Science in Sports &amp Exercise 01/2001;
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Research Papers in Education 01/2009;
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