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Publication History View all

  • Global Public Health 09/2011; 6(6):681-3.
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    ABSTRACT: In recent years, there has been increased involvement of the for-profit sector in the development of nonprofit frameworks for organizational transformation of nongovernmental organizations (NGOs). The present paper uses a social psychological approach to examine an exchange between the sectors in which business management consultants travel to developing countries to offer their skills to NGOs. Social representations theory provides a means of delving into the various meanings these business management consultants attribute to international development and the NGO work environment. The study reveals that consultants tend to interpret the NGO sector and international development through a lens of profit and efficiency, and that experience working with an NGO may actually strengthen this perspective.
    Journal of Applied Social Psychology 04/2010; 40(5):1106 - 1122.
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    ABSTRACT: Gender is well recognised as a critical consideration for HIV/AIDS organisations. Since the 1990s, HIV/AIDS policy-makers, donors, non-governmental organisations and transnational corporations have adopted gender mainstreaming as the process for integrating gender into development programmes and institutions. There is an increasing body of literature on the successes and challenges of practicing gender mainstreaming within organisational environments, however, little has been said about this practice within HIV/AIDS-specific organisational environments. As a contribution to this gap, this reflective paper aims to generate debate about some of the considerations for gender mainstreaming practice in HIV/AIDS organisations. It draws on the author's experience conducting a gender mainstreaming review with a southern African HIV/AIDS capacity-strengthening organisation, as well as a review of the development literature on gender mainstreaming. The paper looks at three key issues facing gender mainstreaming: (1) donor requirements on disaggregating data by sex; (2) connecting gender mainstreaming with the priorities of community HIV/AIDS organisations; and (3) the role of resistance to gender mainstreaming as neo-colonial. Preliminary understandings of these issues suggest that current approaches to gender mainstreaming may not be flexible enough to consider the multiple ways gender and HIV/AIDS interact in different sociocultural contexts. There is an urgent need for further debate and in-depth research into these issues, given the challenge they pose for HIV/AIDS organisations and donors that have chosen to make gender mainstreaming a criterion for HIV/AIDS funding.
    AIDS Care 01/2010; 22 Suppl 2:1613-9.
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    ABSTRACT: This paper explores the limits of lesbian camp as it is currently conceived within Lesbian Studies. I argue, in what I hope is a rather circuitous way, that a reliance on repudiative models of identity formation fixes gender as complementary and sexuality as oppositional, irrespective of intention. In this context, I imagine instead what it would take to theorize femininity itself as camp, and femme subjects as ideal for working this through at the level of praxis.
    Journal of Lesbian Studies 02/2007; 11(1-2):159-66.
  • Constellations 03/2003; 5(1):96 - 109.
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    ABSTRACT: In the context of current concerns about health inequalities among minority ethnic groups in the UK, this paper addresses perceptions of mental health services among members of an African-Caribbean community in a South England town. Efforts to reduce health inequalities must take account of the views of local community members on the sources of those inequalities and on local health services. The statistical existence of inequalities in diagnosis and treatment of African-Caribbeans in the UK is well-established, supported by sociological explanations of these inequalities which centre on social exclusion in a variety of forms: institutional, cultural and socio-economic. However, detailed studies of the perspectives of local communities on mental health issues and services have received less attention. In this case study of community perceptions of mental health services, we find that social exclusion comprises an explanatory framework which is repeatedly invoked by community members in describing their interaction with mental health services. Interviewees assert that experience and expectation of racist mis-treatment by mental health services are key factors discouraging early accessing of mental health services, and thereby perpetuating mental health inequalities. We conclude that participation and partnership are vital means by which to generate both the objective and subjective inclusion that are requirements for an accessible and appropriate health service.
    Social Science [?] Medicine 03/2003; 56(3):657-69.
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    ABSTRACT: Recruitment of informants can 'make or break' social research projects, yet this has received little research attention. Drawing on our recent qualitative research into health and social capital in a multi-ethnic neighbourhood in South England, this paper presents a detailed analysis of the complexities encountered in recruiting research informants who described themselves as African-Caribbean, Pakistani-Kashmiri and white English. Three methods of recruitment were used: (1) advertisements and articles in local media, (2) institutional contacts through local voluntary organisations and (3) interpersonal contacts, referrals and snowballing. We compare and contrast the experiences of ethnically matched interviewers who conducted research amongst the three aforementioned ethnic groups. These experiences were recorded by means of lengthy interviewer 'debriefing questionnaires' that focused on factors that had served to help or hinder them in finding research participants. These questionnaires formed the basis of a discussion workshop in which the interviewers and researchers sought to identify the factors impacting on the recruitment process. Our findings suggest that local advertisements and media contact worked best for recruiting members of the white English community in our South English town. Interpersonal contacts were crucial in recruiting Pakistani-Kashmiri informants. Institutional contacts were the most useful way of accessing African-Caribbean individuals. We conclude that local ethnic identities and social networks produce qualitatively different responses to recruitment attempts in different communities. Such differences necessitate the employment of a range of recruitment methodologies and detailed formative research in a target community before commencing recruitment.
    Ethnicity and Health 03/2003; 8(1):41-61.
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    Constellations 12/2002; 8(2):249 - 266.
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    ABSTRACT: This paper describes qualitative methods used in a research project for the former Health Education Authority, exploring Putnam's concept of 'social capital' in relation to children and young people's well-being and health. Putnam's conceptualization of social capital consists of the following features: trust, reciprocal support, civic engagement, community identity and social networks, and the premise is that levels of social capital in a community have an important effect on people's well-being. Research was carried out with 102 children aged between 12 and 15 in two relatively deprived parts of a town in southeast England. The paper describes the research setting, methods, consent process and ethical issues that arose. It explores how the methods generated different forms of interconnected data, giving rise to a number of health/well-being-related themes. The paper concludes that using a range of methods, including visual methods, has helped to explore quality of life issues for children that are usually neglected in studies of young people's health-related behaviours.
    Health Education Research 07/2001; 16(3):255-68.
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