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    ABSTRACT: Global ICT programs are defined as new and universal modes of organizing mediated by technology and enacted through a novel mix of policy instruments, international institutions, business interests, and techno/managerial concepts. Largely unexplored in the various fields studying innovation and digital technologies, such programs are of interest, not least because of their projected ability to promote innovation and help achieve new mechanisms of governance at local, national, and global scale. Based on relevant information systems research, this paper argues that we need a new theoretical understanding for the study of such programs and in order to explore their potential as a means of technology transfer and innovation in the developed and developing world.
    Government Information Quarterly 01/2009;
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    ABSTRACT: Information technology is becoming an increasingly important factor in contemporary management. Information systems are being set up in business explicitly to accommodate the new opportunities of this technology, and these are having a lasting effect on managerial practice. The full implications of this technology-driven development have not been appreciated by organizations, which in absorbing technological systems, are tolerating a great drain on their resources.The efficacy of computers is predicated on the acceptance of some very specific perspectives. A growing discontent and disappointment with their limited achievements is our reason for advocating a different point of view. We will discuss how a shift in perspective, particularly in respect to the perception of uncertainty, will affect thinking and practice in the field of management support systems. We will render our view of the application of computerized decision support systems (DSS), and especially, we will focus on the beliefs and assumptions that have shaped this technology thus far. To this end we will discuss the concept of uncertainty, by juxtaposing current thinking and practice with our understanding of the context of its application. Finally, we will place our understanding of uncertainty in a managerial context and explain the implications this would have for strategists.
    Information Systems Journal 03/2008; 1(1):61 - 70.
  • Information Systems Journal 03/2008; 2(2):161 - 165.
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    ABSTRACT: The impact that information technology can have on development is the subject of an ongoing debate. Central to this debate is the role of universities. Education shapes people's attitudes toward technology and determines how it will be used. This research shows that in India, students at higher educational institutions are socialized to believe that information technology can have a very positive impact on their country. They do not share the skepticism commonly found in Western literature. This research finds that first and foremost, IT is seen as a tool for personal development, where students can leverage their education to become rich and successful, either in India or abroad. Second, IT is seen as a tool for Indian ascension, lifting India to the status of a great global power. Only thirdly is IT seen as a means to assist in the development of India's poor population. © 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    Information Technology for Development 05/2006; 12(3):201 - 212.
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    ABSTRACT: IT-based government reform projects form an integral part of policy-making. These projects include a variety of different types of applications, each of which has a different scope and rationality according to what type of governemt reform is intended. Looking back over a 17-year period, the author describes the evolution of IT-based government reform initiatives in the Indian state of Gujarat. The findings reveal the interrelatedness of back-end and front-end IT-based government reform initiatives and provide insights into the kinds of institutional support and activities required in order for these initiatives to lead to governance reform. Copyright © 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    Journal of International Development 02/2006; 18(6):877-888.
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    ABSTRACT: This paper argues that information systems (IS) research conducted within the standard account of the paradigms of positivism and interpretivism suffers from persistent theory-practice inconsistencies. These inconsistencies are located between researchers’ stated (or implicit) ontological assumptions and research practice and results. Such a situation calls for a (re)consideration of the underlying ontological premises of information systems research and practice. This paper proposes that a critical realist ontology allows for one re-interpretation of the activity of science as implicitly predicated upon natural and social realism as well as the concepts of structures and generative mechanisms. This interpretation provides greater explanatory power vis-a`-vis current research practices and resolves the theory-practice contradictions highlighted above. Consequently, it is a powerful logical argument for accepting this new conceptualization as an improvement upon the former. To illustrate, this paper recasts one such debate in light
    Information and Organization 01/2006; 16:191-211.
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    ABSTRACT: There is a need to understand and conceptualize the relationships between work activities, the context of work, and the use of mobile technologies because of the widespread diffusion of mobile information and communication technologies within organizational settings. The police have, since the advent of radio communication systems, deployed mobile technologies to support officers in conducting their jobs and offer an exemplary domain for studying the use of mobile technologies. This paper applies the theory of virtualization as a means to characterize the use of mobile technologies for operational policing. The paper suggests the concept of rhythms of interaction as a method of characterizing the alternation in intensity of communication through and with mobile technologies and the intricate relationships between physical and virtual contexts of work.
    Information and Organization. 04/2005;
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    ABSTRACT: This article presents an analysis of UK legislation on the retention of communications data that was introduced in the aftermath of the attacks of September 11, 2001. It presents a review of the discourses surrounding this legislation in parliament, in the wider international policy arena, in business and in terms of technology. The review of these discourses demonstrates that, in understanding policies involving a significant technological component such as communications data retention, policy alternatives may be evaluated only with an appreciation of technological characteristics alongside the traditional concerns of legislators, civil society and the business community. While academia has developed many forms of analysis for political, international, and regulatory discourses, the same must be undertaken for technological discourse, i.e. the interactions between the policies in question, the actors, and the technologies. Developing forms of analysis for technological discourses will likely lead to further understanding of both the policy problem and the actors’ interests. The paper also shows how current institutions are slowly developing the necessary skills to incorporate the technological aspects of policy into political debate, and calls for a similar development for the law.
    Telecommunications Policy. 01/2005;
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    ABSTRACT: Prior concerns regarding terrorism resulted in a rush to legislate. Now terrorism is not the only issue in the new security agenda, and we appear to have stopped rushing our legislative processes. Yet, policies are still emerging with a lack of public discourse and legislative deliberation. This article reviews two such policies: access to personal information held by airlines and new border practices that include the collection and processing of biometrics. By looking at the negotiations between the U.S. and the European Commission on passenger name records (PNR), the debates in Canada regarding the collection of passenger information, and the deployment of the US-VISIT system, we identify a number of policy dynamics. We can see within these dynamics of policy formation some essential ingredients for discourse and deliberation, which may inform future debates. In particular, this article argues that we may inform policy by looking at the international, regulatory, legal, and technological dynamics of policy.
    Government Information Quarterly. 01/2005;
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    ABSTRACT: This paper explores the interpretative flexibility of ERP systems through the study of a project to implement a hosted system for the Central Accounting Department of a large multinational. The paper presents intensive case study data around the decision to implement the system and analyses it in terms of the interpretative flexibility of the system. The paper questions the extent to which technological features of the new system influence the perceived flexibility of the system.
    The Journal of Strategic Information Systems. 01/2005;
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