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Publication History View all

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    ABSTRACT: To explore how older people with lung and colorectal cancer view registered complementary therapy (CT) services in Northern Ireland. A literature review highlighted gaps around information, access, and communication between patients and health professionals regarding CT services. Using structured interviews, a survey of 68 patients in one hospital and one hospice was conducted in Belfast, Northern Ireland. All respondents felt that CT services should be better promoted and more easily accessible to older people with cancer. Some patients were concerned about the lack of written information provided regarding CT services, which they believed led to poorer uptake and uncertainty regarding the potential benefits. Others were concerned that engaging in or disclosing CT usage might negatively affect existing relationships with medical professionals. Patients should be offered high quality written information on CT services to enable choice, improve knowledge, and promote wider access. Increased physician education may facilitate provision of such information.
    International journal of palliative nursing 07/2013; 19(7):333-9.
  • Evidence-based nursing 01/2013;
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    ABSTRACT: We report a longitudinal study investigating developmental changes in the structure of attention engagement during early infancy. Forty-three infants were observed monthly from 2 to 4 months. Attention engagement was assessed from play interactions with parents, using a coding system developed by Bakeman and Adamson (1984). The results indicated a developmental transition in attention engagement at 3 months: after this age infants engaged for longer periods and in a wider variety of states. Most infants displayed person engagement at 2 months, passive joint engagement at 3 months, and object engagement at 4 months. To address whether emerging abilities of attention engagement allow infants to follow the attention of social partners, we compared attention engagement to performance on an experimental measure of attention control (reported by Perra & Gattis, 2010). Analyses revealed a positive relation between passive joint engagement and checking back, suggesting that changes in passive joint engagement reflect the development in attention control.
    Infant behavior & development 09/2012; 35(4):635-644.
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    ABSTRACT: We investigated the relationship between implementation of workplace smoking cessation support activities and employee smoking cessation. In 2 cohort studies, participants were 6179 Finnish public-sector employees who self-reported as smokers at baseline in 2004 (study 1) or 2008 (study 2) and responded to follow-up surveys in 2008 (study 1; n=3298; response rate = 71%) or 2010 (study 2; n=2881; response rate=83%). Supervisors' reports were used to assess workplace smoking cessation support activities. We conducted multilevel logistic regression analyses to examine changes in smoking status. After adjustment for sociodemographic characteristics, number of cigarettes smoked per day, work unit size, shift work, type of job contract, health status, and health behaviors, baseline smokers whose supervisors reported that the employing agency had offered pharmacological treatments or financial incentives were more likely than those in workplaces that did not offer such support to have quit smoking. In general, associations were stronger among moderate or heavy smokers (≥ 10 cigarettes/day) than among light smokers (<10 cigarettes/day). Cessation activities offered by employers may encourage smokers, particularly moderate or heavy smokers, to quit smoking.
    American Journal of Public Health 05/2012; 102(7):e56-62.
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    ABSTRACT: Many patients with lung cancer are symptomatic from diagnosis, and quality of life (QoL) may be maximised through the use of specialist palliative care in parallel with other treatments. This study explored anxiety, depression, and QoL in five patients, predominantly male (n=4) and with mean age 74 years, using a 'Breathing Space' clinic over a 4-week period. Breathing Space is a nurse-led multidisciplinary outpatient clinic using integrative care with lung cancer patients. The patients received weekly interventions to improve their wellbeing. Qualitative data were collected to explore their expectations and experiences of the clinic, and quantitative data were captured using the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group Performance Status Rating (ECOG-PSR), the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), the EQ-VAS, and the EQ-5D. These data were analysed using thematic content analysis and SPSS respectively. It was found that preconceived ideas about clinic attendance were replaced with positive impressions. Anxiety and EQ-VAS scores improved for all patients, and depression scores improved for four of the five patients, although no tests of significance were made. The qualitative data indicated that there were psychosocial benefits to attending the clinic.
    International journal of palliative nursing 05/2012; 18(5):225-33.
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    ABSTRACT: This paper considers the utility of Ethnomethodology (EM) for the study of healthcare ethics as part of the empirical turn in Bioethics. I give a brief introduction to EM through its respecification of sociology, the specific view on the social world this generates and EM's posture of 'indifference'. I then take a number of EM concepts and articulate each in the context of an EM study of healthcare ethics in professional practice. Having given an overview of the relationship and perspective EM might bring to the professional practice of healthcare ethics I consider whether and how such an approach could be deployed. Whilst an ethnographic study might be problematic I suggest a number of alternative methods through which such EM research could be accomplished. I conclude with the suggestion that, as a particular approach to sociological research, EM offers good deal of potential for the empirical study of healthcare ethics in practice which could result in an improved reflexive understanding of professional ethical practices in bioethics.
    Health Care Analysis 02/2012;
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    ABSTRACT: Methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) is an intervention used to treat opioid (heroin) dependence. Several investigators have found that MMT is effective in reducing heroin use and other behaviors; however, a disproportionate number of MMT clients leave treatment prematurely. Moreover, MMT outcome variables are often limited in terms of their measurement. Utilizing an integrated theoretical framework of social control and stigma, we focused on the experiences of methadone maintenance from the perspective of clients. We pooled interview data from four qualitative studies in two jurisdictions and found linkages between social control and institutional stigma that serve to reinforce "addict" identities, expose undeserving customers to the public gaze, and encourage clients to be passive recipients of treatment. We discuss the implications for recovery and suggest recommendations for change.
    Qualitative Health Research 01/2012; 22(6):810-24.
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    ABSTRACT: Despite differences in how it is defined, there is a general consensus amongst clinicians and researchers that the sexual abuse of children and adolescents ('child sexual abuse') is a substantial social problem worldwide. The effects of sexual abuse manifest in a wide range of symptoms, including fear, anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder and various externalising and internalising behaviour problems, such as inappropriate sexual behaviours. Child sexual abuse is associated with increased risk of psychological problems in adulthood. Cognitive-behavioural approaches are used to help children and their non-offending or 'safe' parent to manage the sequelae of childhood sexual abuse. This review updates the first Cochrane review of cognitive-behavioural approaches interventions for children who have been sexually abused, which was first published in 2006. To assess the efficacy of cognitive-behavioural approaches (CBT) in addressing the immediate and longer-term sequelae of sexual abuse on children and young people up to 18 years of age. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (2011 Issue 4); MEDLINE (1950 to November Week 3 2011); EMBASE (1980 to Week 47 2011); CINAHL (1937 to 2 December 2011); PsycINFO (1887 to November Week 5 2011); LILACS (1982 to 2 December 2011) and OpenGrey, previously OpenSIGLE (1980 to 2 December 2011). For this update we also searched ClinicalTrials.gov and the International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP). We included randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials of CBT used with children and adolescents up to age 18 years who had experienced being sexually abused, compared with treatment as usual, with or without placebo control. At least two review authors independently assessed the eligibility of titles and abstracts identified in the search. Two review authors independently extracted data from included studies and entered these into Review Manager 5 software. We synthesised and presented data in both written and graphical form (forest plots). We included 10 trials, involving 847 participants. All studies examined CBT programmes provided to children or children and a non-offending parent. Control groups included wait list controls (n = 1) or treatment as usual (n = 9). Treatment as usual was, for the most part, supportive, unstructured psychotherapy. Generally the reporting of studies was poor. Only four studies were judged 'low risk of bias' with regards to sequence generation and only one study was judged 'low risk of bias' in relation to allocation concealment. All studies were judged 'high risk of bias' in relation to the blinding of outcome assessors or personnel; most studies did not report on these, or other issues of bias. Most studies reported results for study completers rather than for those recruited.Depression, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), anxiety and child behaviour problems were the primary outcomes. Data suggest that CBT may have a positive impact on the sequelae of child sexual abuse, but most results were not statistically significant. Strongest evidence for positive effects of CBT appears to be in reducing PTSD and anxiety symptoms, but even in these areas effects tend to be 'moderate' at best. Meta-analysis of data from five studies suggested an average decrease of 1.9 points on the Child Depression Inventory immediately after intervention (95% confidence interval (CI) decrease of 4.0 to increase of 0.4; I(2) = 53%; P value for heterogeneity = 0.08), representing a small to moderate effect size. Data from six studies yielded an average decrease of 0.44 standard deviations on a variety of child post-traumatic stress disorder scales (95% CI 0.16 to 0.73; I(2) = 46%; P value for heterogeneity = 0.10). Combined data from five studies yielded an average decrease of 0.23 standard deviations on various child anxiety scales (95% CI 0.3 to 0.4; I(2) = 0%; P value for heterogeneity = 0.84). No study reported adverse effects. The conclusions of this updated review remain the same as those when it was first published. The review confirms the potential of CBT to address the adverse consequences of child sexual abuse, but highlights the limitations of the evidence base and the need for more carefully conducted and better reported trials.
    Cochrane database of systematic reviews (Online) 01/2012; 5:CD001930.
  • Child Abuse Review 11/2011; 20(6):395 - 406.
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    ABSTRACT: To examine whether students' school engagement, relationships with teachers, educational aspirations and involvement in fights at school are associated with various measures of subsequent substance use. Data were drawn from the Belfast Youth Development Study (n = 2968). Multivariate logistic models examined associations between school-related factors (age 13/14) and substance use (age 15/16). The two factors which were consistently and independently associated with regular substance use among both males and females were student-teacher relationships and fighting at school: positive teacher-relationships reduced the risk of daily smoking by 48%, weekly drunkenness by 25%, and weekly cannabis use by 52%; being in a fight increased the risk of daily smoking by 54%, weekly drunkenness by 31%, and weekly cannabis use by 43%. School disengagement increased the likelihood of smoking and cannabis use among females only. Further research should focus on public health interventions promoting positive relationships and safety at school.
    Journal of Adolescence 09/2011; 35(2):315-24.
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