29
325.53
11.23
146

Publication History View all

  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Measurements on the dissociative recombination (DR) of protonated acrylonitrile, CH 2 CHCNH + , have been performed at the heavy ion storage ring CRYRING located in the Manne Siegbahn Laboratory in Stockholm, Sweden. It has been found that at ∼2 meV relative kinetic energy about 50% of the DR events involve only ruptures of X–H bonds (where X = C or N) while the rest leads to the production of a pair of fragments each containing two heavy atoms (alongside H and/or H 2). The absolute DR cross section has been investigated for relative kinetic energies ranging from ∼1 meV to 1 eV. The thermal rate coefficient has been determined to follow the expression k(T) = 1.78 × 10 −6 (T/300) −0.80 cm 3 s −1 for electron temperatures ranging from ∼10 to 1000 K. Gas-phase models of the nitrile chemistry in the dark molecular cloud TMC-1 have been run and results are compared with observations. Also, implications of the present results for the nitrile chemistry of Titan's upper atmosphere are discussed.
    The Astrophysical Journal 10/2015; 695:317-324.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Energy levels and radiative rates are reported for transitions in Cl-like W LVIII. Configuration interaction (CI) has been included among 44 configurations (generating 4978 levels) over a wide energy range up to 363 Ryd, and the general-purpose relativistic atomic structure package ({\sc grasp}) adopted for the calculations. Since no other results of comparable complexity are available, calculations have also been performed with the flexible atomic code ({\sc fac}), which help in assessing the accuracy of our results. Energies are listed for the lowest 400 levels (with energies up to $\sim$ 98 Ryd), which mainly belong to the 3s$^2$3p$^5$, 3s3p$^6$, 3s$^2$3p$^4$3d, 3s$^2$3p$^3$3d$^2$, 3s3p$^4$3d$^2$, 3s$^2$3p$^2$3d$^3$, and 3p$^6$3d configurations, and radiative rates are provided for four types of transitions, i.e. E1, E2, M1, and M2. Our energy levels are assessed to be accurate to better than 0.5%, whereas radiative rates (and lifetimes) should be accurate to better than 20% for a majority of the strong transitions.
    Atomic Data and Nuclear Data Tables. 06/2014;
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Super-luminous supernovae that radiate more than 10(44) ergs per second at their peak luminosity have recently been discovered in faint galaxies at redshifts of 0.1-4. Some evolve slowly, resembling models of 'pair-instability' supernovae. Such models involve stars with original masses 140-260 times that of the Sun that now have carbon-oxygen cores of 65-130 solar masses. In these stars, the photons that prevent gravitational collapse are converted to electron-positron pairs, causing rapid contraction and thermonuclear explosions. Many solar masses of (56)Ni are synthesized; this isotope decays to (56)Fe via (56)Co, powering bright light curves. Such massive progenitors are expected to have formed from metal-poor gas in the early Universe. Recently, supernova 2007bi in a galaxy at redshift 0.127 (about 12 billion years after the Big Bang) with a metallicity one-third that of the Sun was observed to look like a fading pair-instability supernova. Here we report observations of two slow-to-fade super-luminous supernovae that show relatively fast rise times and blue colours, which are incompatible with pair-instability models. Their late-time light-curve and spectral similarities to supernova 2007bi call the nature of that event into question. Our early spectra closely resemble typical fast-declining super-luminous supernovae, which are not powered by radioactivity. Modelling our observations with 10-16 solar masses of magnetar-energized ejecta demonstrates the possibility of a common explosion mechanism. The lack of unambiguous nearby pair-instability events suggests that their local rate of occurrence is less than 6 × 10(-6) times that of the core-collapse rate.
    Nature 10/2013; 502(7471):346-9.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The discovery of two superluminous supernovae at large distances from Earth pushes the frontier of supernova studies to just 1.5 billion years after the Big Bang, and suggests that they may be common in the young Universe. See Letter p.228
    Nature 10/2012;
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We report calculations of energy levels, radiative rates, and electron impact excitation rates for transitions in Li-like ions with 12 <= Z <= 20. The GRASP (general-purpose relativistic atomic structure package) is adopted for calculating energy levels and radiative rates, while for determining the collision strengths and subsequently the excitation rates, the Dirac atomic R-matrix code DARC is used. Oscillator strengths, radiative rates, and line strengths are reported for all E1, E2, M1, and M2 transitions among the lowest 24 levels of the Li-like ions considered. Collision strengths have been averaged over a Maxwellian velocity distribution, and the effective collision strengths obtained are reported over a wide temperature range up to 10$^{7.4}$ K. Additionally, lifetimes are also listed for all calculated levels of the above ions. Finally, extensive comparisons are made with available results in the literature, as well as with our parallel calculations for all parameters with the Flexible Atomic Code FAC in order to assess the accuracy of the reported results.
    Atomic Data and Nuclear Data Tables 07/2012; 99(2).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The final fate of massive stars depends on many factors. Theory suggests that some with initial masses greater than 25 to 30 solar masses end up as Wolf-Rayet stars, which are deficient in hydrogen in their outer layers because of mass loss through strong stellar winds. The most massive of these stars have cores which may form a black hole and theory predicts that the resulting explosion of some of them produces ejecta of low kinetic energy, a faint optical luminosity and a small mass fraction of radioactive nickel. An alternative origin for low-energy supernovae is the collapse of the oxygen-neon core of a star of 7-9 solar masses. No weak, hydrogen-deficient, core-collapse supernovae have hitherto been seen. Here we report that SN 2008ha is a faint hydrogen-poor supernova. We propose that other similar events have been observed but have been misclassified as peculiar thermonuclear supernovae (sometimes labelled SN 2002cx-like events). This discovery could link these faint supernovae to some long-duration gamma-ray bursts, because extremely faint, hydrogen-stripped core-collapse supernovae have been proposed to produce such long gamma-ray bursts, the afterglows of which do not show evidence of associated supernovae.
    Nature 07/2009; 459(7247):674-7.
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The flow of energy through the solar atmosphere and the heating of the Sun's outer regions are still not understood. Here, we report the detection of oscillatory phenomena associated with a large bright-point group that is 430,000 square kilometers in area and located near the solar disk center. Wavelet analysis reveals full-width half-maximum oscillations with periodicities ranging from 126 to 700 seconds originating above the bright point and significance levels exceeding 99%. These oscillations, 2.6 kilometers per second in amplitude, are coupled with chromospheric line-of-sight Doppler velocities with an average blue shift of 23 kilometers per second. A lack of cospatial intensity oscillations and transversal displacements rules out the presence of magneto-acoustic wave modes. The oscillations are a signature of Alfvén waves produced by a torsional twist of +/-22 degrees. A phase shift of 180 degrees across the diameter of the bright point suggests that these torsional Alfvén oscillations are induced globally throughout the entire brightening. The energy flux associated with this wave mode is sufficient to heat the solar corona.
    Science 04/2009; 323(5921):1582-5.
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: An anomalous transient in the early Hubble-type (S0) galaxy Messier 85 (M85) in the Virgo cluster was discovered by Kulkarni et al. on 7 January 2006 that had very low luminosity (peak absolute R-band magnitude M(R) of about -12) that was constant over more than 80 days, red colour and narrow spectral lines, which seem inconsistent with those observed in any known class of transient events. Kulkarni et al. suggest an exotic stellar merger as the possible origin. An alternative explanation is that the transient in M85 was a type II-plateau supernova of extremely low luminosity, exploding in a lenticular galaxy with residual star-forming activity. This intriguing transient might be the faintest supernova that has ever been discovered.
    Nature 11/2007; 449(7164):E1-2.
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The death of massive stars produces a variety of supernovae, which are linked to the structure of the exploding stars. The detection of several precursor stars of type II supernovae has been reported (see, for example, ref. 3), but we do not yet have direct information on the progenitors of the hydrogen-deficient type Ib and Ic supernovae. Here we report that the peculiar type Ib supernova SN 2006jc is spatially coincident with a bright optical transient that occurred in 2004. Spectroscopic and photometric monitoring of the supernova leads us to suggest that the progenitor was a carbon-oxygen Wolf-Rayet star embedded within a helium-rich circumstellar medium. There are different possible explanations for this pre-explosion transient. It appears similar to the giant outbursts of luminous blue variable stars (LBVs) of 60-100 solar masses, but the progenitor of SN 2006jc was helium- and hydrogen-deficient (unlike LBVs). An LBV-like outburst of a Wolf-Rayet star could be invoked, but this would be the first observational evidence of such a phenomenon. Alternatively, a massive binary system composed of an LBV that erupted in 2004, and a Wolf-Rayet star exploding as SN 2006jc, could explain the observations.
    Nature 07/2007; 447(7146):829-32.
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: If Wolf-Rayet stars are the progenitors of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), they must rotate rapidly to produce the GRB. This rotation may affect their stellar-wind bubbles and possibly explain why so many GRB afterglows occur in a constant density medium.
    Philosophical Transactions of The Royal Society A Mathematical Physical and Engineering Sciences 06/2007; 365(1854):1255-6.
Information provided on this web page is aggregated encyclopedic and bibliographical information relating to the named institution. Information provided is not approved by the institution itself. The institution’s logo (and/or other graphical identification, such as a coat of arms) is used only to identify the institution in a nominal way. Under certain jurisdictions it may be property of the institution.