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Publication History View all

  • The Lancet 01/2013; 381(9861):108-9.
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    ABSTRACT: To sketch out how contemporary Anglophone literature on self-damaging behaviour negotiates serious conceptual difficulties around intention, and to demonstrate (in the British context) how the large-scale emergence of this type of behaviour is made possible by new forms of psychological provision at district general hospitals. In the past decade, there has been increasing public awareness of 'self-harm'. Despite the view that 'self-harm' has always existed, the British roots of the current 'epidemic' can be traced to changes in the organization of mental healthcare in the postwar period. These changes make possible new understandings of the story behind physical injuries, and allow these readings to be aggregated and projected onto a national, epidemic scale. The increasing provision of psychiatric expertise in general hospitals makes possible new interpretations of self-injury - as psychosocial communication, or affect self-regulation - and creates the phenomenon of 'self-harm' as we understand it today.
    Current opinion in psychiatry 11/2012; 25(6):503-7.
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    ABSTRACT: The word "emotion" has named a psychological category and a subject for systematic enquiry only since the 19th century. Before then, relevant mental states were categorised variously as "appetites," "passions," "affections," or "sentiments." The word "emotion" has existed in English since the 17th century, originating as a translation of the French émotion, meaning a physical disturbance. It came into much wider use in 18th-century English, often to refer to mental experiences, becoming a fully fledged theoretical term in the following century, especially through the influence of two Scottish philosopher-physicians, Thomas Brown and Charles Bell. This article relates this intellectual and semantic history to contemporary debates about the usefulness and meaning of "emotion" as a scientific term.
    Emotion Review 10/2012; 4(4):338-344.
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    ABSTRACT: This paper examines the early schooling, in London and in Cambridge, of the later Nobel laureate and President of the Royal Society, the physiologist Sir Henry Dale (1875-1968). The influence of key teachers who directed the boy's interest towards science, and the impact of his schooling on his university education and later scientific career, are examined in particular. The significance of the zoologist Edward Butler of Tollington Park College, who taught Dale in his early teenage years, is highlighted.
    Notes and Records of The Royal Society 12/2011; 65(4):379-91.
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    Medical history 07/2011; 55(3):369-74.
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    ABSTRACT: The histories of emotion address many fundamental themes of science and medicine. These include the ways the body and its workings have been historically observed and measured, the rise of the mind sciences, and the anthropological analyses by which "ways of knowing" are culturally situated. Yet such histories bring their own challenges, not least in how historians of science and medicine view the relationship between bodies, minds, and emotions. This essay explores some of the methodological challenges of emotion history, using the sudden death of the surgeon John Hunter from cardiac disease as a case study. It argues that we need to let go of many of our modem assumptions about the origin of emotions, and "brainhood", that dominate discussions of identity, in order to explore the historical meanings of emotions as products of the body as well as the mind.
    Isis 12/2009; 100(4):798-810.
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    ABSTRACT: Emotions maintain an ambivalent position in the economy of science. In contemporary debates they are variously seen as hardwired biological responses, cultural artifacts, or uneasy mixtures of the two. At the same time, there is a tension between the approaches to emotion developed in modern psychotherapies and in the history of science. While historians see the successful ascription of affective states to individuals and populations as a social and technical achievement, the psychodynamic practitioner treats these enduring associations as pathological accidents that need to be overcome. This short essay uses the career of the Glaswegian public health investigator James L. Halliday to examine how debates over the ontological status of the emotions and their durability allow them to travel between individual identity and political economy, making possible new kinds of psychological intervention.
    Isis 12/2009; 100(4):827-38.
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    Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine 12/1989; 82(11):640-2.
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