147
299.83
2.04
270

Publication History View all

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: From RACs to Advisory Councils analyses the discourse of stakeholders engaged in Europe׳s Common Fisheries Policy (CFP) in a tier of governance known as RACs (Regional Advisory Councils) from 2004 to 2008. The analysis demonstrates a shift towards discursive sharing by participating stakeholders. This fostered inclusion but did not effect a redistribution of the power held by Europe׳s inter-governmental institutions. This more substantive change would require more, and more consistent, discursive consensus from stakeholders. With a reformed CFP for 2014, this paper considers the possibility of a future in which regional stakeholder-based fisheries governance becomes a reality.
    Marine Policy 07/2014; 47:87-93. DOI:10.1016/j.marpol.2014.02.015
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This paper investigates contemporary academic accounts of the public sphere. In particular, it takes stock of post-Habermasian public sphere scholarship, and acknowledges a lively and variegated debate concerning the multiple ways in which individuals engage in contemporary political affairs. A critical eye is cast over a range of key insights which have come to establish the parameters of what 'counts' as a/the public sphere, who can be involved, and where and how communicative networks are established. This opens up the conceptual space for re-imagining a/the public sphere as an assemblage. Making use of recent developments in Deleuzian-inspired assemblage theory - most especially drawn from DeLanda's (2006) 'new philosophy of society' - the paper sets out an alternative perspective on the notion of the public sphere, and regards it as a space of connectivity brought into being through a contingent and heterogeneous assemblage of discursive, visual and performative practices. This is mapped out with reference to the cultural politics of roadside memorialization. However, a/the public sphere as an assemblage is not simply a 'social construction' brought into being through a logic of connectivity, but is an emergent and ephemeral space which reflexively nurtures and assembles the cultural politics (and political cultures) of which it is an integral part. The discussion concludes, then, with a consideration of the contribution of assemblage theory to public sphere studies. (Also see Campbell 2009a).
    British Journal of Sociology 09/2013; 64(3):526-47. DOI:10.1111/1468-4446.12030
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The lower Muge valley, a tributary of the lower Tagus River (Portugal), features an important archaeological record of Mesolithic shell midden sites. Archaeological research has long assumed that tidally influenced valley floor environments in the immediate locality of the sites provided a rich food resource, attracting Mesolithic settlement. To date there has been little attempt to use palaeoenvironmental records to reconstruct Holocene floodplain evolution in the Lower Tagus valley. The cultivated freshwater lower Muge floodplain is locally underlain by ∼11 m of homogeneous fine-grained sediments and peat, comprising buried floodplain environments contemporary with Mesolithic occupation (∼6200–4800 cal BC). Pollen and foraminifera analyses demonstrate that fine-grained deposition, forced by sea-level rise, commenced ∼6200 cal BC in an estuarine setting. The lower Muge floodplain experienced maximum tidal influence ∼5800–5500 cal BC. Subsequently, sediment supply rates overtook the decreasing rate of sea-level rise and fluvial environments expanded. The pollen record may suggest regional desiccation from ∼5000 cal BC. Estuarine environments disappeared suddenly ∼3800 cal BC when freshwater wetlands were established. Although the initiation of Mesolithic settlement is shown to coincide with the beginning of tidal influence, site abandonment does not match with any major environmental change. Sea-level still stand (∼2600 cal BC) has been linked to valley floor stabilisation and soil formation. Alder floodplain woodland developed prior to ∼230 cal BC and was cleared, probably during Roman times, for agriculture. Renewed deposition after ∼230 cal BC may relate to internal mechanisms or to human impact upon the catchment vegetation.
    Quaternary International 08/2013; DOI:10.1016/j.quaint.2007.09.007
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Natterjack toads Bufo calamita have declined sharply at heathland sites in Britain during the 20th century. A significant feature of these habitats is the predominance of oligotrophic and dystrophic ponds on substrates with low buffering capacities. Acid ponds at one site, Woolmer Forest, were classified into two groups: shallow pools dominated by Sphagnum and high concentrations of organic solutes, and larger bodies of water in which pH was primarily influenced by inorganic anions (especially SO4). Pond pHs responded transiently to episodes of very acid (pH < 4) rain, but acidity in the larger ponds was probably modulated mainly by mobilisation of sulphur accumulated in sedimentary peat over many decades. Rain was significantly acidified (on average about threefold) after passage through pine canopies, but this effect was not observed after percolation through birch foliage. Two large ponds previously used but deserted by natterjacks within the last 50 years were too acid (pH < 4.5) in the 1980s to support embryonic and larval development. Evidence from diatom, macrophyte, heavy metal and soot particle analyses of sediment cores from these ponds indicated that recent acidification has occurred as a consequence of atmospheric pollution. The pH of one acidified pond rose rapidly after removal of recent sedimentary peat. The implications of these observations for heathland conservation are discussed.
    Biological Conservation 08/2013; DOI:10.1016/0006-3207(90)90059-X
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The past decade has seen a growth in demand for human eggs for stem cell related research and, more recently, for mitochondrial research. That demand has been accompanied by global debates over whether women should be encouraged, by offers of payments, in cash or kind, to provide eggs. Few of these debates have been informed by empirical evidence, let alone by the views of women themselves. This article addresses that gap in knowledge by presenting findings from a UK investigation, conducted 2008-2011, which is the first systematic study of women volunteering to provide eggs under such circumstances. This article focuses on the views and experiences of 25 IVF patients who volunteered for the Newcastle 'egg sharing for research' scheme (NESR), in exchange for reduced IVF fees. This was an interview based study, designed to gain understandings of volunteers' perspectives and reasoning. The interviews show that volunteers approached the scheme as a way of accessing more treatment in pursuit of their goal of having a baby, against a landscape of inadequate state provision of treatment and expensive private treatment. The process of deciding to volunteer raised a wide range of uncertainties about the consequent gains and losses, for women already in the uncertain world of the 'IVF rollercoaster'. However, interviewees preferred to have the option of the NESR, than not, and they juggled the numerous uncertainties with skill and resilience. The article is as revealing of the ongoing challenges of the UK IVF bio-economy as it is of egg provision. This article adds to the growing body of knowledge of the contributions of tissue providers to the global bio-economy. It also contributes to several areas of wider sociological interest, including debates on the social management of 'uncertainty' and discussions at the interface of sociology and ethics.
    Social Science [?] Medicine 06/2013; 86:45-51. DOI:10.1016/j.socscimed.2013.03.002
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: For the last sixty years, two institutions have shaped the destiny of the town of Oświęcim in southern Poland. One of these institutions is globally recognised, its history and development widely researched; the other is well known only amongst Polish industrialists, perhaps Polish economic geographers, and amongst the people of Oświęcim. These two institutions are the Auschwitz State Museum and the chemical firm Dwory SA. Both institutions have their roots in the German Occupation of Poland 1939–1945. This paper presents the tale of these two institutions in order not only to highlight the need to embed memorial sites in their wider contexts, but also to indicate the impact of such sites as political–economic institutions, with the influence to shape social and economic landscapes. In laying out the geographies of the town and its two major institutions, we draw attention to the ways in which Holocaust memorialisation and post-socialist transformation are articulated with each other, not only here in Oświęcim, and also with wider processes of social, economic, political and cultural change.
    Geoforum 04/2013; DOI:10.1016/j.geoforum.2007.09.004
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This paper argues for the continued significance of the text as a source and focus in critical geopolitical inquiry. It establishes the utility of the military memoir in explorations of popular contemporary geopolitical imaginaries, and considers the memoir as a vector of militarism. The paper examines the memoirs written by military personnel about service in Afghanistan with the British armed forces, specifically about deployments to Helmand province between 2006 and 2012. The paper explores how Afghanistan is scripted through these texts, focussing on the explanations for deployment articulated by their authors, on the representations they contain and promote about other combatants and about civilian non-combatants, and the constitution and expression of danger in the spaces and places of military action which these texts construct and convey. The paper then turns to consider how a reading of the military memoir with reference to the genre of testimonio might extend and inform our understanding and use of these texts as a source for exploring popular geopolitics and militarism.
    Political Geography 11/2012; 31(8):495-508. DOI:10.1016/j.polgeo.2012.10.006
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Volunteer tourism (VT) has often been depicted as a means of avoiding the commodification of tourism (and even ecotourism) by ensuring that local communities benefit from VT, both environmentally and economically, and that there is authentic engagement by the tourists with indigent people and their cultures. However, critics have questioned this claim, arguing that VT has become little different from tourism and ecotourism, entailing commodification by providing profit for VT organizations rather than for local communities and consuming rather than respecting local environments and cultures. This study tests these claims and counterclaims by a comparative analysis of two VT experiences, one in Vietnam and the other in Thailand. The findings of the study are that although each cohort of volunteer tourists (VTs) exhibited elements of both decommodification and commodification, on a continuum of decommodification and commodification, the Vietnam VTs were closer to the decommodification node, whereas the Thailand VTs were closer to the commodification node. In part, this was because the Vietnam VT project was pitched more towards conservation research, whereas the Thailand VT project was pitched more towards vacation conservation. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    International Journal of Tourism Research 05/2012; 14(3):222 - 234. DOI:10.1002/jtr.848
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Fluvial geomorphology is now very much centrally involved in river basin planning and management, particularly in helping to define the physical conditions that are considered to be characteristic of natural, or largely undisturbed, rivers. The last 20-30 years have been dominated by conceptual approaches, but predictive assessments that integrate hydrology, geomorphology and ecology are still largely lacking. River restoration in the UK remains site-specific rather than strategic in nature and there is a need for improved knowledge across the whole flow regime because hydrological variability plays an important role in defining river system character and behaviour. ‘Hydromorphology’ is an important consideration in the European Union Water Framework Directive, so provides an ideal opportunity for fluvial geomorphology to underpin inter-disciplinary issues and sustainable river management. Knowledge about the quantitative and qualitative aspects of physical habitat is important in helping to determine the type and location of management intervention that will improve ecological conditions in rivers. Although considerable progress has been made in developing this approach conceptually, communication gaps persist between scientists, the public and river managers and this means that practical application of sustainable river management has not developed to the same extent. Major catchment-scale research challenges over the next 20 years in support of adaptive management are: (i) a better understanding of the hydrological and morphological linkages with biological communities over a range of spatial and time-related scales; (ii) more catchment-wide audits of factors influencing sediment erosion, transport and deposition; and (iii) more detailed examination of flood events, as this is when the majority of significant change occurs in river systems. The paradigm shift towards an ‘ecosystems services’ approach also presents a challenge as this requires river scientists to put monetary values on a range of river ecosystem components, functions and processes.
    River Conservation and Management, 02/2012: pages 381 - 401; , ISBN: 9781119961819
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This article utilises social movement literature to help explain the early cultural formation of the Amber Collective—a longstanding egalitarian arts group from Northeast England—and the broader oppositional film movement of which it was a part. More specifically, we attempt theoretically to rework traditional social movement concepts like political opportunity, mobilisation and framing by developing their cultural corollaries. In doing so, we attempt to contribute modestly to wider debates within social movement theory itself about the conditions under which certain types of cultural organisations can originate, form, legitimate, and sustain themselves. Emphasis here is placed on the relationship and shift from political to cultural opportunity; the mobilisation of cultural institutions, networks, leadership, and social ties in the formation of oppositional film movements and organisations like Amber; and the framing processes undertaken to identify and distinguish themselves from the cultural mainstream. In the conclusion, we briefly touch on a number of questions regarding the application of our framework, more generally, for understanding collective action and the cultural formation of arts organisations today.
    Poetics 02/2012; 40(1):22–43. DOI:10.1016/j.poetic.2011.12.001
Information provided on this web page is aggregated encyclopedic and bibliographical information relating to the named institution. Information provided is not approved by the institution itself. The institution’s logo (and/or other graphical identification, such as a coat of arms) is used only to identify the institution in a nominal way. Under certain jurisdictions it may be property of the institution.